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Helen Friel’s “Here’s Looking at Euclid”
Mathematics is like art; you either understand the concepts (i.e., you ‘get it’), or you become completely lost when coming into contact with them. Some people are able to understand both complex theories and expressions in art, and equations that, for some people, look like a bag of numbers and symbols exploded onto a piece of paper. In 1847, Oliver Byrne, a civil engineer and author, published a book called “Euclid’s Elements” which used coloured graphic explanations of each geometric principle. The style of graphics is similar to that of the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements, but since the book predates each, it could very well have been an inspiration for the creativity of the modernists.
Fast forward to the present, and a new rebirth of this book’s mathematical illustrations is inspiring paper engineer and illustrator Helen Friel to create three-dimensional sculpture replicas of the exact graphics in the book. The artists’ series, entitled “Here’s Looking at Euclid” (2012) uses the instructions found in Byrne’s book to create tangible mathematical theorems in the palm of your hand. Sure, it is a cool sculpture all on its own, but it is also an amazing tool to help teach people these theorems, especially those who are more visual learners and have difficulty concentrating on a page full of numbers.
If you would like to make one of these sculptures yourself, you can download and make your very own paper model of Pythagoras’ Theorem here.
-Anna Paluch
Helen Friel’s “Here’s Looking at Euclid”
Mathematics is like art; you either understand the concepts (i.e., you ‘get it’), or you become completely lost when coming into contact with them. Some people are able to understand both complex theories and expressions in art, and equations that, for some people, look like a bag of numbers and symbols exploded onto a piece of paper. In 1847, Oliver Byrne, a civil engineer and author, published a book called “Euclid’s Elements” which used coloured graphic explanations of each geometric principle. The style of graphics is similar to that of the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements, but since the book predates each, it could very well have been an inspiration for the creativity of the modernists.
Fast forward to the present, and a new rebirth of this book’s mathematical illustrations is inspiring paper engineer and illustrator Helen Friel to create three-dimensional sculpture replicas of the exact graphics in the book. The artists’ series, entitled “Here’s Looking at Euclid” (2012) uses the instructions found in Byrne’s book to create tangible mathematical theorems in the palm of your hand. Sure, it is a cool sculpture all on its own, but it is also an amazing tool to help teach people these theorems, especially those who are more visual learners and have difficulty concentrating on a page full of numbers.
If you would like to make one of these sculptures yourself, you can download and make your very own paper model of Pythagoras’ Theorem here.
-Anna Paluch
Helen Friel’s “Here’s Looking at Euclid”
Mathematics is like art; you either understand the concepts (i.e., you ‘get it’), or you become completely lost when coming into contact with them. Some people are able to understand both complex theories and expressions in art, and equations that, for some people, look like a bag of numbers and symbols exploded onto a piece of paper. In 1847, Oliver Byrne, a civil engineer and author, published a book called “Euclid’s Elements” which used coloured graphic explanations of each geometric principle. The style of graphics is similar to that of the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements, but since the book predates each, it could very well have been an inspiration for the creativity of the modernists.
Fast forward to the present, and a new rebirth of this book’s mathematical illustrations is inspiring paper engineer and illustrator Helen Friel to create three-dimensional sculpture replicas of the exact graphics in the book. The artists’ series, entitled “Here’s Looking at Euclid” (2012) uses the instructions found in Byrne’s book to create tangible mathematical theorems in the palm of your hand. Sure, it is a cool sculpture all on its own, but it is also an amazing tool to help teach people these theorems, especially those who are more visual learners and have difficulty concentrating on a page full of numbers.
If you would like to make one of these sculptures yourself, you can download and make your very own paper model of Pythagoras’ Theorem here.
-Anna Paluch
Helen Friel’s “Here’s Looking at Euclid”
Mathematics is like art; you either understand the concepts (i.e., you ‘get it’), or you become completely lost when coming into contact with them. Some people are able to understand both complex theories and expressions in art, and equations that, for some people, look like a bag of numbers and symbols exploded onto a piece of paper. In 1847, Oliver Byrne, a civil engineer and author, published a book called “Euclid’s Elements” which used coloured graphic explanations of each geometric principle. The style of graphics is similar to that of the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements, but since the book predates each, it could very well have been an inspiration for the creativity of the modernists.
Fast forward to the present, and a new rebirth of this book’s mathematical illustrations is inspiring paper engineer and illustrator Helen Friel to create three-dimensional sculpture replicas of the exact graphics in the book. The artists’ series, entitled “Here’s Looking at Euclid” (2012) uses the instructions found in Byrne’s book to create tangible mathematical theorems in the palm of your hand. Sure, it is a cool sculpture all on its own, but it is also an amazing tool to help teach people these theorems, especially those who are more visual learners and have difficulty concentrating on a page full of numbers.
If you would like to make one of these sculptures yourself, you can download and make your very own paper model of Pythagoras’ Theorem here.
-Anna Paluch

Helen Friel’s “Here’s Looking at Euclid”

Mathematics is like art; you either understand the concepts (i.e., you ‘get it’), or you become completely lost when coming into contact with them. Some people are able to understand both complex theories and expressions in art, and equations that, for some people, look like a bag of numbers and symbols exploded onto a piece of paper. In 1847, Oliver Byrne, a civil engineer and author, published a book called “Euclid’s Elements” which used coloured graphic explanations of each geometric principle. The style of graphics is similar to that of the Bauhaus and De Stijl movements, but since the book predates each, it could very well have been an inspiration for the creativity of the modernists.

Fast forward to the present, and a new rebirth of this book’s mathematical illustrations is inspiring paper engineer and illustrator Helen Friel to create three-dimensional sculpture replicas of the exact graphics in the book. The artists’ series, entitled “Here’s Looking at Euclid” (2012) uses the instructions found in Byrne’s book to create tangible mathematical theorems in the palm of your hand. Sure, it is a cool sculpture all on its own, but it is also an amazing tool to help teach people these theorems, especially those who are more visual learners and have difficulty concentrating on a page full of numbers.

If you would like to make one of these sculptures yourself, you can download and make your very own paper model of Pythagoras’ Theorem here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ helen friel oliver byrne anna paluch geometry mathematics art science engineering paper engineering paper art art and science art and science journal Euclid
Shattered Reflections
Using mirrors and glass in her sculptures, Japanese artist Tomoko Konoike plays with optics and light reflection to turn what would be a free standing art piece, into an installation, Earthshine (2013) that takes over the space in which it’s in. The whole room becomes the art, as the viewer becomes engulfed in this new world the artist has created; a result of the geometric light patterns bouncing off the walls. 
Whether figurative or abstract, the artist’s work explores how natural forces collide and find peace with one’s consciousness, combining geometric shapes and optical light illusions to create out-of-this world spaces, playing with our perceptions of space. Tomoko Konoike manages to use the precise shapes and positioning of the glass to manipulate not just the shape of the piece, but the space as well, playing with the viewer’s imagination. Is the room a cave, forest or cosmos? In the end, it is the viewer’s imagination, which decides where they are transported to.
-Anna Paluch
Shattered Reflections
Using mirrors and glass in her sculptures, Japanese artist Tomoko Konoike plays with optics and light reflection to turn what would be a free standing art piece, into an installation, Earthshine (2013) that takes over the space in which it’s in. The whole room becomes the art, as the viewer becomes engulfed in this new world the artist has created; a result of the geometric light patterns bouncing off the walls. 
Whether figurative or abstract, the artist’s work explores how natural forces collide and find peace with one’s consciousness, combining geometric shapes and optical light illusions to create out-of-this world spaces, playing with our perceptions of space. Tomoko Konoike manages to use the precise shapes and positioning of the glass to manipulate not just the shape of the piece, but the space as well, playing with the viewer’s imagination. Is the room a cave, forest or cosmos? In the end, it is the viewer’s imagination, which decides where they are transported to.
-Anna Paluch
Shattered Reflections
Using mirrors and glass in her sculptures, Japanese artist Tomoko Konoike plays with optics and light reflection to turn what would be a free standing art piece, into an installation, Earthshine (2013) that takes over the space in which it’s in. The whole room becomes the art, as the viewer becomes engulfed in this new world the artist has created; a result of the geometric light patterns bouncing off the walls. 
Whether figurative or abstract, the artist’s work explores how natural forces collide and find peace with one’s consciousness, combining geometric shapes and optical light illusions to create out-of-this world spaces, playing with our perceptions of space. Tomoko Konoike manages to use the precise shapes and positioning of the glass to manipulate not just the shape of the piece, but the space as well, playing with the viewer’s imagination. Is the room a cave, forest or cosmos? In the end, it is the viewer’s imagination, which decides where they are transported to.
-Anna Paluch

Shattered Reflections

Using mirrors and glass in her sculptures, Japanese artist Tomoko Konoike plays with optics and light reflection to turn what would be a free standing art piece, into an installation, Earthshine (2013) that takes over the space in which it’s in. The whole room becomes the art, as the viewer becomes engulfed in this new world the artist has created; a result of the geometric light patterns bouncing off the walls. 

Whether figurative or abstract, the artist’s work explores how natural forces collide and find peace with one’s consciousness, combining geometric shapes and optical light illusions to create out-of-this world spaces, playing with our perceptions of space. Tomoko Konoike manages to use the precise shapes and positioning of the glass to manipulate not just the shape of the piece, but the space as well, playing with the viewer’s imagination. Is the room a cave, forest or cosmos? In the end, it is the viewer’s imagination, which decides where they are transported to.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ tomoko konoike optics light geometry fantasy art science art and science journal anna paluch

Exploring Colour, Space, and Tape: Installations by Rebecca Ward
The contemporary practice of artfully transforming spaces with temporal, time-sensitive, and often delicate materials is a personal interest of mine. These site-specific works often reflect so much of the world around us - offering instances of momentary wonder that can be erased from consciousness without a moment’s notice. It’s this preoccupation with ephemeral ideas and presentations that drives the production of site-specific installation. 
This temporal feeling is achieved through the medium of Rebecca Ward’s colourful works. Ward’s primary interest in exploring geometric space through colour, texture, and light led to her use of tape (electrical tape, painter’s tape, masking tape, etc.) to create intricate spatial transformations. Of course, these installations are entirely impressive in person as the spaces Ward alters rely on a direct association to the viewer - the manipulation of space at work in Ward’s installations constantly shifting with each viewer interaction. 
The sense of temporality is therefore also achieved through individual interactions on the part of the viewer, with each viewer experiencing a different element or angle of the installation. 
Ward’s installations also successfully expose architectural elements and unique structures through her mathematical and geometric application of tape. The result is a playful and colourful interjection in an otherwise empty space, a gesture that can be seen as a re-invention of the postmodern tradition of the “white cube” gallery. 
For more information about Rebecca’s works, please visit her website. 
- Victoria Nolte

Exploring Colour, Space, and Tape: Installations by Rebecca Ward
The contemporary practice of artfully transforming spaces with temporal, time-sensitive, and often delicate materials is a personal interest of mine. These site-specific works often reflect so much of the world around us - offering instances of momentary wonder that can be erased from consciousness without a moment’s notice. It’s this preoccupation with ephemeral ideas and presentations that drives the production of site-specific installation. 
This temporal feeling is achieved through the medium of Rebecca Ward’s colourful works. Ward’s primary interest in exploring geometric space through colour, texture, and light led to her use of tape (electrical tape, painter’s tape, masking tape, etc.) to create intricate spatial transformations. Of course, these installations are entirely impressive in person as the spaces Ward alters rely on a direct association to the viewer - the manipulation of space at work in Ward’s installations constantly shifting with each viewer interaction. 
The sense of temporality is therefore also achieved through individual interactions on the part of the viewer, with each viewer experiencing a different element or angle of the installation. 
Ward’s installations also successfully expose architectural elements and unique structures through her mathematical and geometric application of tape. The result is a playful and colourful interjection in an otherwise empty space, a gesture that can be seen as a re-invention of the postmodern tradition of the “white cube” gallery. 
For more information about Rebecca’s works, please visit her website. 
- Victoria Nolte

Exploring Colour, Space, and Tape: Installations by Rebecca Ward
The contemporary practice of artfully transforming spaces with temporal, time-sensitive, and often delicate materials is a personal interest of mine. These site-specific works often reflect so much of the world around us - offering instances of momentary wonder that can be erased from consciousness without a moment’s notice. It’s this preoccupation with ephemeral ideas and presentations that drives the production of site-specific installation. 
This temporal feeling is achieved through the medium of Rebecca Ward’s colourful works. Ward’s primary interest in exploring geometric space through colour, texture, and light led to her use of tape (electrical tape, painter’s tape, masking tape, etc.) to create intricate spatial transformations. Of course, these installations are entirely impressive in person as the spaces Ward alters rely on a direct association to the viewer - the manipulation of space at work in Ward’s installations constantly shifting with each viewer interaction. 
The sense of temporality is therefore also achieved through individual interactions on the part of the viewer, with each viewer experiencing a different element or angle of the installation. 
Ward’s installations also successfully expose architectural elements and unique structures through her mathematical and geometric application of tape. The result is a playful and colourful interjection in an otherwise empty space, a gesture that can be seen as a re-invention of the postmodern tradition of the “white cube” gallery. 
For more information about Rebecca’s works, please visit her website. 
- Victoria Nolte

Exploring Colour, Space, and Tape: Installations by Rebecca Ward
The contemporary practice of artfully transforming spaces with temporal, time-sensitive, and often delicate materials is a personal interest of mine. These site-specific works often reflect so much of the world around us - offering instances of momentary wonder that can be erased from consciousness without a moment’s notice. It’s this preoccupation with ephemeral ideas and presentations that drives the production of site-specific installation. 
This temporal feeling is achieved through the medium of Rebecca Ward’s colourful works. Ward’s primary interest in exploring geometric space through colour, texture, and light led to her use of tape (electrical tape, painter’s tape, masking tape, etc.) to create intricate spatial transformations. Of course, these installations are entirely impressive in person as the spaces Ward alters rely on a direct association to the viewer - the manipulation of space at work in Ward’s installations constantly shifting with each viewer interaction. 
The sense of temporality is therefore also achieved through individual interactions on the part of the viewer, with each viewer experiencing a different element or angle of the installation. 
Ward’s installations also successfully expose architectural elements and unique structures through her mathematical and geometric application of tape. The result is a playful and colourful interjection in an otherwise empty space, a gesture that can be seen as a re-invention of the postmodern tradition of the “white cube” gallery. 
For more information about Rebecca’s works, please visit her website. 
- Victoria Nolte

Exploring Colour, Space, and Tape: Installations by Rebecca Ward

The contemporary practice of artfully transforming spaces with temporal, time-sensitive, and often delicate materials is a personal interest of mine. These site-specific works often reflect so much of the world around us - offering instances of momentary wonder that can be erased from consciousness without a moment’s notice. It’s this preoccupation with ephemeral ideas and presentations that drives the production of site-specific installation. 

This temporal feeling is achieved through the medium of Rebecca Ward’s colourful works. Ward’s primary interest in exploring geometric space through colour, texture, and light led to her use of tape (electrical tape, painter’s tape, masking tape, etc.) to create intricate spatial transformations. Of course, these installations are entirely impressive in person as the spaces Ward alters rely on a direct association to the viewer - the manipulation of space at work in Ward’s installations constantly shifting with each viewer interaction. 

The sense of temporality is therefore also achieved through individual interactions on the part of the viewer, with each viewer experiencing a different element or angle of the installation. 

Ward’s installations also successfully expose architectural elements and unique structures through her mathematical and geometric application of tape. The result is a playful and colourful interjection in an otherwise empty space, a gesture that can be seen as a re-invention of the postmodern tradition of the “white cube” gallery. 

For more information about Rebecca’s works, please visit her website

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art geometry installation tape temporal site-specific artscij rebecca ward victoria nolte
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Leo de Freyne
These geometric, stylized iceberg paintings by Dublin artist and writer Leo de Freyne capture the architecture of these natural structures and the poetry of their colossal presence. But the iceberg is of course more than an aesthetic object; this pristine, natural sculpture has also become a symbol for those other losses incurred due to climate change. And at a time when climate change threatens the environment perhaps more than ever, one worries that the inspiration for such paintings will soon become mere memory. 
See more of de Freyne’s artwork here. Also check out photographer Camille Seaman’s Last Iceberg Series.
- Erin Saunders
Leo de Freyne
These geometric, stylized iceberg paintings by Dublin artist and writer Leo de Freyne capture the architecture of these natural structures and the poetry of their colossal presence. But the iceberg is of course more than an aesthetic object; this pristine, natural sculpture has also become a symbol for those other losses incurred due to climate change. And at a time when climate change threatens the environment perhaps more than ever, one worries that the inspiration for such paintings will soon become mere memory. 
See more of de Freyne’s artwork here. Also check out photographer Camille Seaman’s Last Iceberg Series.
- Erin Saunders
Leo de Freyne
These geometric, stylized iceberg paintings by Dublin artist and writer Leo de Freyne capture the architecture of these natural structures and the poetry of their colossal presence. But the iceberg is of course more than an aesthetic object; this pristine, natural sculpture has also become a symbol for those other losses incurred due to climate change. And at a time when climate change threatens the environment perhaps more than ever, one worries that the inspiration for such paintings will soon become mere memory. 
See more of de Freyne’s artwork here. Also check out photographer Camille Seaman’s Last Iceberg Series.
- Erin Saunders
Leo de Freyne
These geometric, stylized iceberg paintings by Dublin artist and writer Leo de Freyne capture the architecture of these natural structures and the poetry of their colossal presence. But the iceberg is of course more than an aesthetic object; this pristine, natural sculpture has also become a symbol for those other losses incurred due to climate change. And at a time when climate change threatens the environment perhaps more than ever, one worries that the inspiration for such paintings will soon become mere memory. 
See more of de Freyne’s artwork here. Also check out photographer Camille Seaman’s Last Iceberg Series.
- Erin Saunders
Leo de Freyne
These geometric, stylized iceberg paintings by Dublin artist and writer Leo de Freyne capture the architecture of these natural structures and the poetry of their colossal presence. But the iceberg is of course more than an aesthetic object; this pristine, natural sculpture has also become a symbol for those other losses incurred due to climate change. And at a time when climate change threatens the environment perhaps more than ever, one worries that the inspiration for such paintings will soon become mere memory. 
See more of de Freyne’s artwork here. Also check out photographer Camille Seaman’s Last Iceberg Series.
- Erin Saunders
Leo de Freyne
These geometric, stylized iceberg paintings by Dublin artist and writer Leo de Freyne capture the architecture of these natural structures and the poetry of their colossal presence. But the iceberg is of course more than an aesthetic object; this pristine, natural sculpture has also become a symbol for those other losses incurred due to climate change. And at a time when climate change threatens the environment perhaps more than ever, one worries that the inspiration for such paintings will soon become mere memory. 
See more of de Freyne’s artwork here. Also check out photographer Camille Seaman’s Last Iceberg Series.
- Erin Saunders
Kyuha Shim’s Isomorphic Geometry in Geo Maps
(i·so·mor·phism n.(mathematics):  one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two sets such that the result of an operation on elements of one set corresponds to the result of the analogous operation on their images in the other set.)
Artist and designer Kyuha Shim’s Geo Maps project explores the mathematical principles at work in the art of paper folding. Visitors to the installation are invited to interact with a small, folded paper sculpture; as he or she rotates the object, an interactive projection plays over a larger, corresponding sculpture of the same shape according to the movements of its “partner.” Geo Map is in this way a study of mathematical complexity through simple forms. But while the projections recall the cool, clean aesthetic of minimalism, the project is in part a response to the losses incurred by the increasing dominance of digital design programs. The artist writes:
"Computer graphics enable designers to generate fascinating outcomes in a very short period, but we are losing the specificity and precision of older generation designers working in traditional media. Through this experience, I learned how to merge traditional and digital mediums using projection mapping, which connected users’ behaviors with the paper installation."
See many more projects by Kyuha Shim here. 
- Erin Saunders
Kyuha Shim’s Isomorphic Geometry in Geo Maps
(i·so·mor·phism n.(mathematics):  one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two sets such that the result of an operation on elements of one set corresponds to the result of the analogous operation on their images in the other set.)
Artist and designer Kyuha Shim’s Geo Maps project explores the mathematical principles at work in the art of paper folding. Visitors to the installation are invited to interact with a small, folded paper sculpture; as he or she rotates the object, an interactive projection plays over a larger, corresponding sculpture of the same shape according to the movements of its “partner.” Geo Map is in this way a study of mathematical complexity through simple forms. But while the projections recall the cool, clean aesthetic of minimalism, the project is in part a response to the losses incurred by the increasing dominance of digital design programs. The artist writes:
"Computer graphics enable designers to generate fascinating outcomes in a very short period, but we are losing the specificity and precision of older generation designers working in traditional media. Through this experience, I learned how to merge traditional and digital mediums using projection mapping, which connected users’ behaviors with the paper installation."
See many more projects by Kyuha Shim here. 
- Erin Saunders
Kyuha Shim’s Isomorphic Geometry in Geo Maps
(i·so·mor·phism n.(mathematics):  one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two sets such that the result of an operation on elements of one set corresponds to the result of the analogous operation on their images in the other set.)
Artist and designer Kyuha Shim’s Geo Maps project explores the mathematical principles at work in the art of paper folding. Visitors to the installation are invited to interact with a small, folded paper sculpture; as he or she rotates the object, an interactive projection plays over a larger, corresponding sculpture of the same shape according to the movements of its “partner.” Geo Map is in this way a study of mathematical complexity through simple forms. But while the projections recall the cool, clean aesthetic of minimalism, the project is in part a response to the losses incurred by the increasing dominance of digital design programs. The artist writes:
"Computer graphics enable designers to generate fascinating outcomes in a very short period, but we are losing the specificity and precision of older generation designers working in traditional media. Through this experience, I learned how to merge traditional and digital mediums using projection mapping, which connected users’ behaviors with the paper installation."
See many more projects by Kyuha Shim here. 
- Erin Saunders
Kyuha Shim’s Isomorphic Geometry in Geo Maps
(i·so·mor·phism n.(mathematics):  one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two sets such that the result of an operation on elements of one set corresponds to the result of the analogous operation on their images in the other set.)
Artist and designer Kyuha Shim’s Geo Maps project explores the mathematical principles at work in the art of paper folding. Visitors to the installation are invited to interact with a small, folded paper sculpture; as he or she rotates the object, an interactive projection plays over a larger, corresponding sculpture of the same shape according to the movements of its “partner.” Geo Map is in this way a study of mathematical complexity through simple forms. But while the projections recall the cool, clean aesthetic of minimalism, the project is in part a response to the losses incurred by the increasing dominance of digital design programs. The artist writes:
"Computer graphics enable designers to generate fascinating outcomes in a very short period, but we are losing the specificity and precision of older generation designers working in traditional media. Through this experience, I learned how to merge traditional and digital mediums using projection mapping, which connected users’ behaviors with the paper installation."
See many more projects by Kyuha Shim here. 
- Erin Saunders

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