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Vince McKelvie’s 3D .gifs

The .gif is one of the most intriguing mediums used in net art. Lingering somewhere between video and picture, the .gif is neither one nor the other, but somehow both. Its perpetual motions are precisely hypnotic and purely mystical. Net artist Vince McKelvie maximises these qualities of the .gif in his work with intense pulsating 3D forms. These mesmerising .gifs – ranging from geometric to biomorphic – are submerged in overwhelming visual detail, appearing as if one could almost draw each from within the screen and into the palm of a hand. What is even more delightful is the psychedelic strobing of colours and the multiplication of the image when the .gif is moused over on the artist’s tumblr. McKelvie plays upon perception and visual engagement – these .gifs require the viewer to surrender themself wholly to the palpitations, to the harsh acidic colours, and to the carefully calculated hypnotic repetition.
The realm of net art is an unstable one. Its foundation is digital technology – a foundation that is arguably too certain of itself. In a world where we’ve built empires upon the virtual domain, the question persists: what will become of digital information generations from today when the technology will be unrecognisable? Net art – unlike the more traditional mediums of painting, sculpting, and even photography – is inseparable from the virtual space it occupies. A painting can be removed from a wall and placed on another. A digital photograph can be printed into its physical form. But a .gif relies on its digital foundation to exist; it cannot simply be printed as a moving image – at least not yet. Will this art still be accessible five hundred years from now? Net art also begs the question of ownership. Defying centuries of well-ingrained notions of the prestige of owning, collecting, and viewing art, net art is decidedly democratised. Anyone can look at it. Anyone can reproduce it. Anyone can use it as their own. Anyone who has access to the technology, that is. This phenomenon is even more so amplified with the use of tumblr, whose users feed parasitically off of one another by reblogging images. By choosing tumblr (and even by uploading his work online), McKelvie inserts himself into an ever-progressing, ever-transforming dialogue of image distribution.
- Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)
Vince McKelvie’s 3D .gifs

The .gif is one of the most intriguing mediums used in net art. Lingering somewhere between video and picture, the .gif is neither one nor the other, but somehow both. Its perpetual motions are precisely hypnotic and purely mystical. Net artist Vince McKelvie maximises these qualities of the .gif in his work with intense pulsating 3D forms. These mesmerising .gifs – ranging from geometric to biomorphic – are submerged in overwhelming visual detail, appearing as if one could almost draw each from within the screen and into the palm of a hand. What is even more delightful is the psychedelic strobing of colours and the multiplication of the image when the .gif is moused over on the artist’s tumblr. McKelvie plays upon perception and visual engagement – these .gifs require the viewer to surrender themself wholly to the palpitations, to the harsh acidic colours, and to the carefully calculated hypnotic repetition.
The realm of net art is an unstable one. Its foundation is digital technology – a foundation that is arguably too certain of itself. In a world where we’ve built empires upon the virtual domain, the question persists: what will become of digital information generations from today when the technology will be unrecognisable? Net art – unlike the more traditional mediums of painting, sculpting, and even photography – is inseparable from the virtual space it occupies. A painting can be removed from a wall and placed on another. A digital photograph can be printed into its physical form. But a .gif relies on its digital foundation to exist; it cannot simply be printed as a moving image – at least not yet. Will this art still be accessible five hundred years from now? Net art also begs the question of ownership. Defying centuries of well-ingrained notions of the prestige of owning, collecting, and viewing art, net art is decidedly democratised. Anyone can look at it. Anyone can reproduce it. Anyone can use it as their own. Anyone who has access to the technology, that is. This phenomenon is even more so amplified with the use of tumblr, whose users feed parasitically off of one another by reblogging images. By choosing tumblr (and even by uploading his work online), McKelvie inserts himself into an ever-progressing, ever-transforming dialogue of image distribution.
- Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)
Vince McKelvie’s 3D .gifs

The .gif is one of the most intriguing mediums used in net art. Lingering somewhere between video and picture, the .gif is neither one nor the other, but somehow both. Its perpetual motions are precisely hypnotic and purely mystical. Net artist Vince McKelvie maximises these qualities of the .gif in his work with intense pulsating 3D forms. These mesmerising .gifs – ranging from geometric to biomorphic – are submerged in overwhelming visual detail, appearing as if one could almost draw each from within the screen and into the palm of a hand. What is even more delightful is the psychedelic strobing of colours and the multiplication of the image when the .gif is moused over on the artist’s tumblr. McKelvie plays upon perception and visual engagement – these .gifs require the viewer to surrender themself wholly to the palpitations, to the harsh acidic colours, and to the carefully calculated hypnotic repetition.
The realm of net art is an unstable one. Its foundation is digital technology – a foundation that is arguably too certain of itself. In a world where we’ve built empires upon the virtual domain, the question persists: what will become of digital information generations from today when the technology will be unrecognisable? Net art – unlike the more traditional mediums of painting, sculpting, and even photography – is inseparable from the virtual space it occupies. A painting can be removed from a wall and placed on another. A digital photograph can be printed into its physical form. But a .gif relies on its digital foundation to exist; it cannot simply be printed as a moving image – at least not yet. Will this art still be accessible five hundred years from now? Net art also begs the question of ownership. Defying centuries of well-ingrained notions of the prestige of owning, collecting, and viewing art, net art is decidedly democratised. Anyone can look at it. Anyone can reproduce it. Anyone can use it as their own. Anyone who has access to the technology, that is. This phenomenon is even more so amplified with the use of tumblr, whose users feed parasitically off of one another by reblogging images. By choosing tumblr (and even by uploading his work online), McKelvie inserts himself into an ever-progressing, ever-transforming dialogue of image distribution.
- Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Vince McKelvie’s 3D .gifs

The .gif is one of the most intriguing mediums used in net art. Lingering somewhere between video and picture, the .gif is neither one nor the other, but somehow both. Its perpetual motions are precisely hypnotic and purely mystical. Net artist Vince McKelvie maximises these qualities of the .gif in his work with intense pulsating 3D forms. These mesmerising .gifs – ranging from geometric to biomorphic – are submerged in overwhelming visual detail, appearing as if one could almost draw each from within the screen and into the palm of a hand. What is even more delightful is the psychedelic strobing of colours and the multiplication of the image when the .gif is moused over on the artist’s tumblr. McKelvie plays upon perception and visual engagement – these .gifs require the viewer to surrender themself wholly to the palpitations, to the harsh acidic colours, and to the carefully calculated hypnotic repetition.

The realm of net art is an unstable one. Its foundation is digital technology – a foundation that is arguably too certain of itself. In a world where we’ve built empires upon the virtual domain, the question persists: what will become of digital information generations from today when the technology will be unrecognisable? Net art – unlike the more traditional mediums of painting, sculpting, and even photography – is inseparable from the virtual space it occupies. A painting can be removed from a wall and placed on another. A digital photograph can be printed into its physical form. But a .gif relies on its digital foundation to exist; it cannot simply be printed as a moving image – at least not yet. Will this art still be accessible five hundred years from now? Net art also begs the question of ownership. Defying centuries of well-ingrained notions of the prestige of owning, collecting, and viewing art, net art is decidedly democratised. Anyone can look at it. Anyone can reproduce it. Anyone can use it as their own. Anyone who has access to the technology, that is. This phenomenon is even more so amplified with the use of tumblr, whose users feed parasitically off of one another by reblogging images. By choosing tumblr (and even by uploading his work online), McKelvie inserts himself into an ever-progressing, ever-transforming dialogue of image distribution.

- Leona Nikolic

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art science ArtScience vince mckelvie .gifs gif 3d net art
Gravity by mrmama.tv
In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,
"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."
But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 
- Lee Jones
Gravity by mrmama.tv
In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,
"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."
But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 
- Lee Jones
Gravity by mrmama.tv
In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,
"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."
But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 
- Lee Jones
Gravity by mrmama.tv
In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,
"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."
But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 
- Lee Jones

Gravity by mrmama.tv

In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,

"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."

But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art science artscience gif technology mrmama lee jones
Matt DiVito
The works of Matt DiVito, a motion graphics designer from Boston, have exploded on tumblr over the past couple of months. His .gifs have a mesmerizing quality that calm and inspire. When asked about these works, he responded,
“Making .gifs evolved from a practice I got into of making short animations as a way to experiment with new styles and techniques. Compared to video, gifs seem to be better suited to showcasing very short animations with the added benefit of endless looping.I tend to think of my gifs as a viewport into a strange alternate universe where everything is just a bit more geometric and retro. They’re meant to inspire a sense of mystery, intrigue and nostalgia.” 
Currently, DiVito spends his time working on motion graphics for various clients. “Beyond that, I’m really interested in game design and have been brainstorming and looking for collaborators for a new game project.” From what we’ve seen of his graphics online, that’d be the most visually appealing video game ever. 
Though it’s no surprise that his .gifs have taken over the net, DiVito describes the process as unreal. As he states, the response has been “certainly well beyond what I hoped for when I started making .gifs. It’s honestly a very validating feeling to have so many people connecting with your own personal style. “
When asked about where he hopes to be in the future, DeVito is excited to work in other areas. “I’d love to be in a position where I could spend all (or at least the vast majority) of my time working on personal projects. I already mentioned my interest in game design, but in my lifetime I’d also love to make movies, apps, music, and whatever else the future may bring. In the meantime, I suppose I’ll keep making .gifs - see where it takes me.”
For more information, and to see more of DeVito’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones

Matt DiVito

The works of Matt DiVito, a motion graphics designer from Boston, have exploded on tumblr over the past couple of months. His .gifs have a mesmerizing quality that calm and inspire. When asked about these works, he responded,

Making .gifs evolved from a practice I got into of making short animations as a way to experiment with new styles and techniques. Compared to video, gifs seem to be better suited to showcasing very short animations with the added benefit of endless looping.I tend to think of my gifs as a viewport into a strange alternate universe where everything is just a bit more geometric and retro. They’re meant to inspire a sense of mystery, intrigue and nostalgia.” 

Currently, DiVito spends his time working on motion graphics for various clients. “Beyond that, I’m really interested in game design and have been brainstorming and looking for collaborators for a new game project.” From what we’ve seen of his graphics online, that’d be the most visually appealing video game ever. 

Though it’s no surprise that his .gifs have taken over the net, DiVito describes the process as unreal. As he states, the response has been “certainly well beyond what I hoped for when I started making .gifs. It’s honestly a very validating feeling to have so many people connecting with your own personal style. “

When asked about where he hopes to be in the future, DeVito is excited to work in other areas. “I’d love to be in a position where I could spend all (or at least the vast majority) of my time working on personal projects. I already mentioned my interest in game design, but in my lifetime I’d also love to make movies, apps, music, and whatever else the future may bring. In the meantime, I suppose I’ll keep making .gifs - see where it takes me.”

For more information, and to see more of DeVito’s work, click here

- Lee Jones

art artscience art and science Matt Divito motion graphics design gif

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