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Phillip Stearns’ Glitch Art Textiles
Within the undefined abyss of the digital realm, multimedia artist Phillip Stearns is seeking to redefine the relationship between traditional artistic practices and the aesthetic explorations of electronic media. Stearns’ interest here lies in the abstraction of the carefully programmed digital artefact – in this case, the digital camera. By physically manipulating the circuitry of the digital camera, Stearns renders this object useless to contemporary photographic practices, instead allowing the camera to capture images outside of our visual realities. These distorted images are a form of glitch art, characterised by unnaturally acidic colours, abrupt geometric sequences, and the aesthetic of a randomised digital error.  Glitch art, in this way, can be read as an explicit rebellion against the precisely structured presence of digital technologies.
For Stearns, however, this preoccupation with the deliberately aestheticised adulteration of digital media transcends this desire to defy the intended usage of such technologies. Through his online project, Year of the Glitch, which features daily posts of his own glitch art, Stearns began to explore the glitch as a textile concept. Now producing woven tapestries, rugs, and blankets of this vibrant digital media, Stearns has developed a correlation between a contemporary technological rebellion and the centuries-old tradition of artistic weaving. These two forms of art, like polar opposites, bring together the intangible realm of digital media with the concrete utilitarian practice of textile-weaving.  
-Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)
Phillip Stearns’ Glitch Art Textiles
Within the undefined abyss of the digital realm, multimedia artist Phillip Stearns is seeking to redefine the relationship between traditional artistic practices and the aesthetic explorations of electronic media. Stearns’ interest here lies in the abstraction of the carefully programmed digital artefact – in this case, the digital camera. By physically manipulating the circuitry of the digital camera, Stearns renders this object useless to contemporary photographic practices, instead allowing the camera to capture images outside of our visual realities. These distorted images are a form of glitch art, characterised by unnaturally acidic colours, abrupt geometric sequences, and the aesthetic of a randomised digital error.  Glitch art, in this way, can be read as an explicit rebellion against the precisely structured presence of digital technologies.
For Stearns, however, this preoccupation with the deliberately aestheticised adulteration of digital media transcends this desire to defy the intended usage of such technologies. Through his online project, Year of the Glitch, which features daily posts of his own glitch art, Stearns began to explore the glitch as a textile concept. Now producing woven tapestries, rugs, and blankets of this vibrant digital media, Stearns has developed a correlation between a contemporary technological rebellion and the centuries-old tradition of artistic weaving. These two forms of art, like polar opposites, bring together the intangible realm of digital media with the concrete utilitarian practice of textile-weaving.  
-Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)
Phillip Stearns’ Glitch Art Textiles
Within the undefined abyss of the digital realm, multimedia artist Phillip Stearns is seeking to redefine the relationship between traditional artistic practices and the aesthetic explorations of electronic media. Stearns’ interest here lies in the abstraction of the carefully programmed digital artefact – in this case, the digital camera. By physically manipulating the circuitry of the digital camera, Stearns renders this object useless to contemporary photographic practices, instead allowing the camera to capture images outside of our visual realities. These distorted images are a form of glitch art, characterised by unnaturally acidic colours, abrupt geometric sequences, and the aesthetic of a randomised digital error.  Glitch art, in this way, can be read as an explicit rebellion against the precisely structured presence of digital technologies.
For Stearns, however, this preoccupation with the deliberately aestheticised adulteration of digital media transcends this desire to defy the intended usage of such technologies. Through his online project, Year of the Glitch, which features daily posts of his own glitch art, Stearns began to explore the glitch as a textile concept. Now producing woven tapestries, rugs, and blankets of this vibrant digital media, Stearns has developed a correlation between a contemporary technological rebellion and the centuries-old tradition of artistic weaving. These two forms of art, like polar opposites, bring together the intangible realm of digital media with the concrete utilitarian practice of textile-weaving.  
-Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)
Phillip Stearns’ Glitch Art Textiles
Within the undefined abyss of the digital realm, multimedia artist Phillip Stearns is seeking to redefine the relationship between traditional artistic practices and the aesthetic explorations of electronic media. Stearns’ interest here lies in the abstraction of the carefully programmed digital artefact – in this case, the digital camera. By physically manipulating the circuitry of the digital camera, Stearns renders this object useless to contemporary photographic practices, instead allowing the camera to capture images outside of our visual realities. These distorted images are a form of glitch art, characterised by unnaturally acidic colours, abrupt geometric sequences, and the aesthetic of a randomised digital error.  Glitch art, in this way, can be read as an explicit rebellion against the precisely structured presence of digital technologies.
For Stearns, however, this preoccupation with the deliberately aestheticised adulteration of digital media transcends this desire to defy the intended usage of such technologies. Through his online project, Year of the Glitch, which features daily posts of his own glitch art, Stearns began to explore the glitch as a textile concept. Now producing woven tapestries, rugs, and blankets of this vibrant digital media, Stearns has developed a correlation between a contemporary technological rebellion and the centuries-old tradition of artistic weaving. These two forms of art, like polar opposites, bring together the intangible realm of digital media with the concrete utilitarian practice of textile-weaving.  
-Leona Nikolic
(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Phillip Stearns’ Glitch Art Textiles

Within the undefined abyss of the digital realm, multimedia artist Phillip Stearns is seeking to redefine the relationship between traditional artistic practices and the aesthetic explorations of electronic media. Stearns’ interest here lies in the abstraction of the carefully programmed digital artefact – in this case, the digital camera. By physically manipulating the circuitry of the digital camera, Stearns renders this object useless to contemporary photographic practices, instead allowing the camera to capture images outside of our visual realities. These distorted images are a form of glitch art, characterised by unnaturally acidic colours, abrupt geometric sequences, and the aesthetic of a randomised digital error.  Glitch art, in this way, can be read as an explicit rebellion against the precisely structured presence of digital technologies.

For Stearns, however, this preoccupation with the deliberately aestheticised adulteration of digital media transcends this desire to defy the intended usage of such technologies. Through his online project, Year of the Glitch, which features daily posts of his own glitch art, Stearns began to explore the glitch as a textile concept. Now producing woven tapestries, rugs, and blankets of this vibrant digital media, Stearns has developed a correlation between a contemporary technological rebellion and the centuries-old tradition of artistic weaving. These two forms of art, like polar opposites, bring together the intangible realm of digital media with the concrete utilitarian practice of textile-weaving. 

-Leona Nikolic

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
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Spencer Keller
Though made with technological means, Spencer Keller’s works have a painterly look. This past March the artist moved from photo manipulation to glitch art. As he describes the change in medium, 
"Something that immediately stuck out for me was the unpredictability of the processes.  Deriving a lot of inspiration from other abstract and surreal art, there was a really profound sense of awakening when I finally started to experiment with glitch.  Not long after I started experimenting did I develop a fondness for glitching pixel art.  The vast majority of my work begins as a very small, simple, non-representational pixel drawing (usually 9x9 pixels).  Using Audacity as a standby for databending (along with an extensive arsenal of free effects plugins) you can quickly turn that simple drawing into something really quite remarkable."
For more of Keller’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Spencer Keller
Though made with technological means, Spencer Keller’s works have a painterly look. This past March the artist moved from photo manipulation to glitch art. As he describes the change in medium, 
"Something that immediately stuck out for me was the unpredictability of the processes.  Deriving a lot of inspiration from other abstract and surreal art, there was a really profound sense of awakening when I finally started to experiment with glitch.  Not long after I started experimenting did I develop a fondness for glitching pixel art.  The vast majority of my work begins as a very small, simple, non-representational pixel drawing (usually 9x9 pixels).  Using Audacity as a standby for databending (along with an extensive arsenal of free effects plugins) you can quickly turn that simple drawing into something really quite remarkable."
For more of Keller’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Spencer Keller
Though made with technological means, Spencer Keller’s works have a painterly look. This past March the artist moved from photo manipulation to glitch art. As he describes the change in medium, 
"Something that immediately stuck out for me was the unpredictability of the processes.  Deriving a lot of inspiration from other abstract and surreal art, there was a really profound sense of awakening when I finally started to experiment with glitch.  Not long after I started experimenting did I develop a fondness for glitching pixel art.  The vast majority of my work begins as a very small, simple, non-representational pixel drawing (usually 9x9 pixels).  Using Audacity as a standby for databending (along with an extensive arsenal of free effects plugins) you can quickly turn that simple drawing into something really quite remarkable."
For more of Keller’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Jamie Boulton
Jamie Boutlon is a glitch-artist—an artist who focuses on the possible uses (or misuses) of technology for artist endeavors. At the same time, his works goes beyond just finding the quirks of our technologies. As he states, they also reveal our relationship with these tools,
"I feel that exploring these processes empowers us by changing our perception of our relationship with technology. We are free to alter and misuse these toys we’ve developed, and oftentimes when a glitch is produced it gives us a window in to the mind of the machine by showing us how they ‘think.’"
To make his works, Boulton uses a technique called databending. This is the process of manipulating data flow through the use of computer software. Boulton’s works are created by taking base images (photographs, scanned documents, etc) and opening the image file in a Hex Editor. Here Boulton adds, removes, or alters the building blocks of the file, which fractures the integrity of the image. The final result becomes corrupted version of its former self. Each file type produces a different form of distortion in accordance with how the data is stored, which as Boulton states, “gives a fascinating insight in to how computers store and display information for us.” And he’s not keeping his process a secret either. You can access a “how to” here. To access more of his work, visit his blog by clicking here. 
- Lee Jones
Jamie Boulton
Jamie Boutlon is a glitch-artist—an artist who focuses on the possible uses (or misuses) of technology for artist endeavors. At the same time, his works goes beyond just finding the quirks of our technologies. As he states, they also reveal our relationship with these tools,
"I feel that exploring these processes empowers us by changing our perception of our relationship with technology. We are free to alter and misuse these toys we’ve developed, and oftentimes when a glitch is produced it gives us a window in to the mind of the machine by showing us how they ‘think.’"
To make his works, Boulton uses a technique called databending. This is the process of manipulating data flow through the use of computer software. Boulton’s works are created by taking base images (photographs, scanned documents, etc) and opening the image file in a Hex Editor. Here Boulton adds, removes, or alters the building blocks of the file, which fractures the integrity of the image. The final result becomes corrupted version of its former self. Each file type produces a different form of distortion in accordance with how the data is stored, which as Boulton states, “gives a fascinating insight in to how computers store and display information for us.” And he’s not keeping his process a secret either. You can access a “how to” here. To access more of his work, visit his blog by clicking here. 
- Lee Jones
Jamie Boulton
Jamie Boutlon is a glitch-artist—an artist who focuses on the possible uses (or misuses) of technology for artist endeavors. At the same time, his works goes beyond just finding the quirks of our technologies. As he states, they also reveal our relationship with these tools,
"I feel that exploring these processes empowers us by changing our perception of our relationship with technology. We are free to alter and misuse these toys we’ve developed, and oftentimes when a glitch is produced it gives us a window in to the mind of the machine by showing us how they ‘think.’"
To make his works, Boulton uses a technique called databending. This is the process of manipulating data flow through the use of computer software. Boulton’s works are created by taking base images (photographs, scanned documents, etc) and opening the image file in a Hex Editor. Here Boulton adds, removes, or alters the building blocks of the file, which fractures the integrity of the image. The final result becomes corrupted version of its former self. Each file type produces a different form of distortion in accordance with how the data is stored, which as Boulton states, “gives a fascinating insight in to how computers store and display information for us.” And he’s not keeping his process a secret either. You can access a “how to” here. To access more of his work, visit his blog by clicking here. 
- Lee Jones

Jamie Boulton

Jamie Boutlon is a glitch-artist—an artist who focuses on the possible uses (or misuses) of technology for artist endeavors. At the same time, his works goes beyond just finding the quirks of our technologies. As he states, they also reveal our relationship with these tools,

"I feel that exploring these processes empowers us by changing our perception of our relationship with technology. We are free to alter and misuse these toys we’ve developed, and oftentimes when a glitch is produced it gives us a window in to the mind of the machine by showing us how they ‘think.’"

To make his works, Boulton uses a technique called databending. This is the process of manipulating data flow through the use of computer software. Boulton’s works are created by taking base images (photographs, scanned documents, etc) and opening the image file in a Hex Editor. Here Boulton adds, removes, or alters the building blocks of the file, which fractures the integrity of the image. The final result becomes corrupted version of its former self. Each file type produces a different form of distortion in accordance with how the data is stored, which as Boulton states, “gives a fascinating insight in to how computers store and display information for us.” And he’s not keeping his process a secret either. You can access a “how to” here. To access more of his work, visit his blog by clicking here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art science technology glitch art glitch jamie boulton lee jones

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