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Wilhelm Rinke
Sometimes a fluke works out just fine. In these works, Wilhelm Rinke reworks a print from a previous generation. As Rinke describes the work,
“These pictures show landscape photographs done by my father about 30 years ago who used to work as a graphic designer. By screen printing he wanted to create a contrast between nature and strict geometric forms. This was just an experimental effort and did not work out very well, because the pictures were incomplete and flawed in their printing. So I found these pictures in a kind of hidden place when I last visited my parents house and took a photograph of the photographs. Later on I retouched and completed the images digitally and that is how this personal but not very typical work of mine and my father emerged.”
To see more of Rinke’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Wilhelm Rinke
Sometimes a fluke works out just fine. In these works, Wilhelm Rinke reworks a print from a previous generation. As Rinke describes the work,
“These pictures show landscape photographs done by my father about 30 years ago who used to work as a graphic designer. By screen printing he wanted to create a contrast between nature and strict geometric forms. This was just an experimental effort and did not work out very well, because the pictures were incomplete and flawed in their printing. So I found these pictures in a kind of hidden place when I last visited my parents house and took a photograph of the photographs. Later on I retouched and completed the images digitally and that is how this personal but not very typical work of mine and my father emerged.”
To see more of Rinke’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Wilhelm Rinke
Sometimes a fluke works out just fine. In these works, Wilhelm Rinke reworks a print from a previous generation. As Rinke describes the work,
“These pictures show landscape photographs done by my father about 30 years ago who used to work as a graphic designer. By screen printing he wanted to create a contrast between nature and strict geometric forms. This was just an experimental effort and did not work out very well, because the pictures were incomplete and flawed in their printing. So I found these pictures in a kind of hidden place when I last visited my parents house and took a photograph of the photographs. Later on I retouched and completed the images digitally and that is how this personal but not very typical work of mine and my father emerged.”
To see more of Rinke’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Visual Exploration of the Period Table
This visual representation of the periodic table—made by photographer Mitch Payne, model maker Louis Standard and graphic designer Sean Docherty—is one of the coolest artsci representations I’ve seen recently. As Payne describes the project,
“The modern periodic table, based on atomic number and electron configuration, was created primarily by a Russian chemist, Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev, and a German physicist, Julius Lothar Meyer, both working independently. They both created similar periodic tables only a few months apart in 1869. Mendeleev created the first periodic table based on atomic weight. He observed that many elements had similar properties, and that they occur periodically. Hence, the table’s name.
His periodic law states that the chemical and physical properties of the elements vary in a periodic way with their atomic weights. The modern one states that the properties vary with atomic number, not weight. Elements in Mendeleev’s table were arranged in rows called periods. The columns were called groups. Elements of each group had similar properties. The periodic table can be divided into ten families of elements exhibiting common characteristics. These images try to illustrate those characteristics using abstract photography” 
This project is both art and education. As Payne states, they wanted to do a project that not only allowed for artistic impression, but also to create a body of educational work for a different demographic. The trio aim to add an interesting and creative spin to something that some may perceive as dull an un-inspiring. Once you know the wonder, you can’t go back. For more on Payne’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Visual Exploration of the Period Table
This visual representation of the periodic table—made by photographer Mitch Payne, model maker Louis Standard and graphic designer Sean Docherty—is one of the coolest artsci representations I’ve seen recently. As Payne describes the project,
“The modern periodic table, based on atomic number and electron configuration, was created primarily by a Russian chemist, Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev, and a German physicist, Julius Lothar Meyer, both working independently. They both created similar periodic tables only a few months apart in 1869. Mendeleev created the first periodic table based on atomic weight. He observed that many elements had similar properties, and that they occur periodically. Hence, the table’s name.
His periodic law states that the chemical and physical properties of the elements vary in a periodic way with their atomic weights. The modern one states that the properties vary with atomic number, not weight. Elements in Mendeleev’s table were arranged in rows called periods. The columns were called groups. Elements of each group had similar properties. The periodic table can be divided into ten families of elements exhibiting common characteristics. These images try to illustrate those characteristics using abstract photography” 
This project is both art and education. As Payne states, they wanted to do a project that not only allowed for artistic impression, but also to create a body of educational work for a different demographic. The trio aim to add an interesting and creative spin to something that some may perceive as dull an un-inspiring. Once you know the wonder, you can’t go back. For more on Payne’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Visual Exploration of the Period Table
This visual representation of the periodic table—made by photographer Mitch Payne, model maker Louis Standard and graphic designer Sean Docherty—is one of the coolest artsci representations I’ve seen recently. As Payne describes the project,
“The modern periodic table, based on atomic number and electron configuration, was created primarily by a Russian chemist, Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev, and a German physicist, Julius Lothar Meyer, both working independently. They both created similar periodic tables only a few months apart in 1869. Mendeleev created the first periodic table based on atomic weight. He observed that many elements had similar properties, and that they occur periodically. Hence, the table’s name.
His periodic law states that the chemical and physical properties of the elements vary in a periodic way with their atomic weights. The modern one states that the properties vary with atomic number, not weight. Elements in Mendeleev’s table were arranged in rows called periods. The columns were called groups. Elements of each group had similar properties. The periodic table can be divided into ten families of elements exhibiting common characteristics. These images try to illustrate those characteristics using abstract photography” 
This project is both art and education. As Payne states, they wanted to do a project that not only allowed for artistic impression, but also to create a body of educational work for a different demographic. The trio aim to add an interesting and creative spin to something that some may perceive as dull an un-inspiring. Once you know the wonder, you can’t go back. For more on Payne’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Visual Exploration of the Period Table
This visual representation of the periodic table—made by photographer Mitch Payne, model maker Louis Standard and graphic designer Sean Docherty—is one of the coolest artsci representations I’ve seen recently. As Payne describes the project,
“The modern periodic table, based on atomic number and electron configuration, was created primarily by a Russian chemist, Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev, and a German physicist, Julius Lothar Meyer, both working independently. They both created similar periodic tables only a few months apart in 1869. Mendeleev created the first periodic table based on atomic weight. He observed that many elements had similar properties, and that they occur periodically. Hence, the table’s name.
His periodic law states that the chemical and physical properties of the elements vary in a periodic way with their atomic weights. The modern one states that the properties vary with atomic number, not weight. Elements in Mendeleev’s table were arranged in rows called periods. The columns were called groups. Elements of each group had similar properties. The periodic table can be divided into ten families of elements exhibiting common characteristics. These images try to illustrate those characteristics using abstract photography” 
This project is both art and education. As Payne states, they wanted to do a project that not only allowed for artistic impression, but also to create a body of educational work for a different demographic. The trio aim to add an interesting and creative spin to something that some may perceive as dull an un-inspiring. Once you know the wonder, you can’t go back. For more on Payne’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Visual Exploration of the Period Table
This visual representation of the periodic table—made by photographer Mitch Payne, model maker Louis Standard and graphic designer Sean Docherty—is one of the coolest artsci representations I’ve seen recently. As Payne describes the project,
“The modern periodic table, based on atomic number and electron configuration, was created primarily by a Russian chemist, Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev, and a German physicist, Julius Lothar Meyer, both working independently. They both created similar periodic tables only a few months apart in 1869. Mendeleev created the first periodic table based on atomic weight. He observed that many elements had similar properties, and that they occur periodically. Hence, the table’s name.
His periodic law states that the chemical and physical properties of the elements vary in a periodic way with their atomic weights. The modern one states that the properties vary with atomic number, not weight. Elements in Mendeleev’s table were arranged in rows called periods. The columns were called groups. Elements of each group had similar properties. The periodic table can be divided into ten families of elements exhibiting common characteristics. These images try to illustrate those characteristics using abstract photography” 
This project is both art and education. As Payne states, they wanted to do a project that not only allowed for artistic impression, but also to create a body of educational work for a different demographic. The trio aim to add an interesting and creative spin to something that some may perceive as dull an un-inspiring. Once you know the wonder, you can’t go back. For more on Payne’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Visual Exploration of the Period Table
This visual representation of the periodic table—made by photographer Mitch Payne, model maker Louis Standard and graphic designer Sean Docherty—is one of the coolest artsci representations I’ve seen recently. As Payne describes the project,
“The modern periodic table, based on atomic number and electron configuration, was created primarily by a Russian chemist, Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev, and a German physicist, Julius Lothar Meyer, both working independently. They both created similar periodic tables only a few months apart in 1869. Mendeleev created the first periodic table based on atomic weight. He observed that many elements had similar properties, and that they occur periodically. Hence, the table’s name.
His periodic law states that the chemical and physical properties of the elements vary in a periodic way with their atomic weights. The modern one states that the properties vary with atomic number, not weight. Elements in Mendeleev’s table were arranged in rows called periods. The columns were called groups. Elements of each group had similar properties. The periodic table can be divided into ten families of elements exhibiting common characteristics. These images try to illustrate those characteristics using abstract photography” 
This project is both art and education. As Payne states, they wanted to do a project that not only allowed for artistic impression, but also to create a body of educational work for a different demographic. The trio aim to add an interesting and creative spin to something that some may perceive as dull an un-inspiring. Once you know the wonder, you can’t go back. For more on Payne’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Visual Exploration of the Period Table
This visual representation of the periodic table—made by photographer Mitch Payne, model maker Louis Standard and graphic designer Sean Docherty—is one of the coolest artsci representations I’ve seen recently. As Payne describes the project,
“The modern periodic table, based on atomic number and electron configuration, was created primarily by a Russian chemist, Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev, and a German physicist, Julius Lothar Meyer, both working independently. They both created similar periodic tables only a few months apart in 1869. Mendeleev created the first periodic table based on atomic weight. He observed that many elements had similar properties, and that they occur periodically. Hence, the table’s name.
His periodic law states that the chemical and physical properties of the elements vary in a periodic way with their atomic weights. The modern one states that the properties vary with atomic number, not weight. Elements in Mendeleev’s table were arranged in rows called periods. The columns were called groups. Elements of each group had similar properties. The periodic table can be divided into ten families of elements exhibiting common characteristics. These images try to illustrate those characteristics using abstract photography” 
This project is both art and education. As Payne states, they wanted to do a project that not only allowed for artistic impression, but also to create a body of educational work for a different demographic. The trio aim to add an interesting and creative spin to something that some may perceive as dull an un-inspiring. Once you know the wonder, you can’t go back. For more on Payne’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Visual Exploration of the Period Table
This visual representation of the periodic table—made by photographer Mitch Payne, model maker Louis Standard and graphic designer Sean Docherty—is one of the coolest artsci representations I’ve seen recently. As Payne describes the project,
“The modern periodic table, based on atomic number and electron configuration, was created primarily by a Russian chemist, Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev, and a German physicist, Julius Lothar Meyer, both working independently. They both created similar periodic tables only a few months apart in 1869. Mendeleev created the first periodic table based on atomic weight. He observed that many elements had similar properties, and that they occur periodically. Hence, the table’s name.
His periodic law states that the chemical and physical properties of the elements vary in a periodic way with their atomic weights. The modern one states that the properties vary with atomic number, not weight. Elements in Mendeleev’s table were arranged in rows called periods. The columns were called groups. Elements of each group had similar properties. The periodic table can be divided into ten families of elements exhibiting common characteristics. These images try to illustrate those characteristics using abstract photography” 
This project is both art and education. As Payne states, they wanted to do a project that not only allowed for artistic impression, but also to create a body of educational work for a different demographic. The trio aim to add an interesting and creative spin to something that some may perceive as dull an un-inspiring. Once you know the wonder, you can’t go back. For more on Payne’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Visual Exploration of the Period Table
This visual representation of the periodic table—made by photographer Mitch Payne, model maker Louis Standard and graphic designer Sean Docherty—is one of the coolest artsci representations I’ve seen recently. As Payne describes the project,
“The modern periodic table, based on atomic number and electron configuration, was created primarily by a Russian chemist, Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev, and a German physicist, Julius Lothar Meyer, both working independently. They both created similar periodic tables only a few months apart in 1869. Mendeleev created the first periodic table based on atomic weight. He observed that many elements had similar properties, and that they occur periodically. Hence, the table’s name.
His periodic law states that the chemical and physical properties of the elements vary in a periodic way with their atomic weights. The modern one states that the properties vary with atomic number, not weight. Elements in Mendeleev’s table were arranged in rows called periods. The columns were called groups. Elements of each group had similar properties. The periodic table can be divided into ten families of elements exhibiting common characteristics. These images try to illustrate those characteristics using abstract photography” 
This project is both art and education. As Payne states, they wanted to do a project that not only allowed for artistic impression, but also to create a body of educational work for a different demographic. The trio aim to add an interesting and creative spin to something that some may perceive as dull an un-inspiring. Once you know the wonder, you can’t go back. For more on Payne’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Visual Exploration of the Period Table
This visual representation of the periodic table—made by photographer Mitch Payne, model maker Louis Standard and graphic designer Sean Docherty—is one of the coolest artsci representations I’ve seen recently. As Payne describes the project,
“The modern periodic table, based on atomic number and electron configuration, was created primarily by a Russian chemist, Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev, and a German physicist, Julius Lothar Meyer, both working independently. They both created similar periodic tables only a few months apart in 1869. Mendeleev created the first periodic table based on atomic weight. He observed that many elements had similar properties, and that they occur periodically. Hence, the table’s name.
His periodic law states that the chemical and physical properties of the elements vary in a periodic way with their atomic weights. The modern one states that the properties vary with atomic number, not weight. Elements in Mendeleev’s table were arranged in rows called periods. The columns were called groups. Elements of each group had similar properties. The periodic table can be divided into ten families of elements exhibiting common characteristics. These images try to illustrate those characteristics using abstract photography” 
This project is both art and education. As Payne states, they wanted to do a project that not only allowed for artistic impression, but also to create a body of educational work for a different demographic. The trio aim to add an interesting and creative spin to something that some may perceive as dull an un-inspiring. Once you know the wonder, you can’t go back. For more on Payne’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones

Visual Exploration of the Period Table

This visual representation of the periodic table—made by photographer Mitch Payne, model maker Louis Standard and graphic designer Sean Docherty—is one of the coolest artsci representations I’ve seen recently. As Payne describes the project,

The modern periodic table, based on atomic number and electron configuration, was created primarily by a Russian chemist, Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev, and a German physicist, Julius Lothar Meyer, both working independently. They both created similar periodic tables only a few months apart in 1869. Mendeleev created the first periodic table based on atomic weight. He observed that many elements had similar properties, and that they occur periodically. Hence, the table’s name.

His periodic law states that the chemical and physical properties of the elements vary in a periodic way with their atomic weights. The modern one states that the properties vary with atomic number, not weight. Elements in Mendeleev’s table were arranged in rows called periods. The columns were called groups. Elements of each group had similar properties. The periodic table can be divided into ten families of elements exhibiting common characteristics. These images try to illustrate those characteristics using abstract photography” 

This project is both art and education. As Payne states, they wanted to do a project that not only allowed for artistic impression, but also to create a body of educational work for a different demographic. The trio aim to add an interesting and creative spin to something that some may perceive as dull an un-inspiring. Once you know the wonder, you can’t go back. For more on Payne’s work, click here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

10 Photos
/ art science periodic table chemistry elements graphic design photography Louis Standard Sean Docherty Mitch Payne lee jones
Reads and Zines with Fabian Wolf’s Death Lost His Bones in a Blind Alley
Fabian Wolf is a designer at Kingdrips, an independent design studio based in Hamburg St. Pauli, Germany, who recently turned to illustration. The 104 paged book looks into 24 stories from our real and imagined past. As Wolf describes the project,
"I have always had interests in presenting a world from the perspective of mankind, which finds its setting far back in a time that actually seems strange and fantastic for us as viewers. The social conflicts and fears at the time of the Middle Ages are very important to me. Legends and demons have always accompanied the history of mankind and in the Middle Ages they dominated everyday life. In the stories that are depicted in the book, I refer to real historical events and myths, which have been handed down to the present."
Wolf’s illustrations and writings have a raw look to them that adds to the spookiness of the stories. To see more of the book, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Reads and Zines with Fabian Wolf’s Death Lost His Bones in a Blind Alley
Fabian Wolf is a designer at Kingdrips, an independent design studio based in Hamburg St. Pauli, Germany, who recently turned to illustration. The 104 paged book looks into 24 stories from our real and imagined past. As Wolf describes the project,
"I have always had interests in presenting a world from the perspective of mankind, which finds its setting far back in a time that actually seems strange and fantastic for us as viewers. The social conflicts and fears at the time of the Middle Ages are very important to me. Legends and demons have always accompanied the history of mankind and in the Middle Ages they dominated everyday life. In the stories that are depicted in the book, I refer to real historical events and myths, which have been handed down to the present."
Wolf’s illustrations and writings have a raw look to them that adds to the spookiness of the stories. To see more of the book, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Reads and Zines with Fabian Wolf’s Death Lost His Bones in a Blind Alley
Fabian Wolf is a designer at Kingdrips, an independent design studio based in Hamburg St. Pauli, Germany, who recently turned to illustration. The 104 paged book looks into 24 stories from our real and imagined past. As Wolf describes the project,
"I have always had interests in presenting a world from the perspective of mankind, which finds its setting far back in a time that actually seems strange and fantastic for us as viewers. The social conflicts and fears at the time of the Middle Ages are very important to me. Legends and demons have always accompanied the history of mankind and in the Middle Ages they dominated everyday life. In the stories that are depicted in the book, I refer to real historical events and myths, which have been handed down to the present."
Wolf’s illustrations and writings have a raw look to them that adds to the spookiness of the stories. To see more of the book, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Matt Hendon
Matt Hendon, an illustrator and graphic designer, makes media works with a variety of inspiration sources. As he states, it runs from “minimal Swiss Design to Neo Rauch’s sort of surreal paintings to 1960’s / 70’s sports cars to architecture.” His works are about juxtaposition and unlikely combinations.
As Hendon describes the art process for his works, “Getting started on creating an image I usually have some sort of graphic idea on how I want to break up the space and a rough 3 or more color palette that interest me.  I save a lot of used paper, construction paper, magazine clippings and my own drawings use them collage a basic frame work to get started.  I also use a lot of spray paint, an airbrush, prisma pencil and pastels to create gradients and texture.  I go through a ton of matte medium and friskette to mask off areas to keep clean edges in particular spots.  Depending on the assignment I will then scan in what I’ve worked on to finish digitally.”
His most recent work, Everything That Can Expire, focuses on lifespan. To see more of his work, and to visit his portfolio site, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Matt Hendon
Matt Hendon, an illustrator and graphic designer, makes media works with a variety of inspiration sources. As he states, it runs from “minimal Swiss Design to Neo Rauch’s sort of surreal paintings to 1960’s / 70’s sports cars to architecture.” His works are about juxtaposition and unlikely combinations.
As Hendon describes the art process for his works, “Getting started on creating an image I usually have some sort of graphic idea on how I want to break up the space and a rough 3 or more color palette that interest me.  I save a lot of used paper, construction paper, magazine clippings and my own drawings use them collage a basic frame work to get started.  I also use a lot of spray paint, an airbrush, prisma pencil and pastels to create gradients and texture.  I go through a ton of matte medium and friskette to mask off areas to keep clean edges in particular spots.  Depending on the assignment I will then scan in what I’ve worked on to finish digitally.”
His most recent work, Everything That Can Expire, focuses on lifespan. To see more of his work, and to visit his portfolio site, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Matt Hendon
Matt Hendon, an illustrator and graphic designer, makes media works with a variety of inspiration sources. As he states, it runs from “minimal Swiss Design to Neo Rauch’s sort of surreal paintings to 1960’s / 70’s sports cars to architecture.” His works are about juxtaposition and unlikely combinations.
As Hendon describes the art process for his works, “Getting started on creating an image I usually have some sort of graphic idea on how I want to break up the space and a rough 3 or more color palette that interest me.  I save a lot of used paper, construction paper, magazine clippings and my own drawings use them collage a basic frame work to get started.  I also use a lot of spray paint, an airbrush, prisma pencil and pastels to create gradients and texture.  I go through a ton of matte medium and friskette to mask off areas to keep clean edges in particular spots.  Depending on the assignment I will then scan in what I’ve worked on to finish digitally.”
His most recent work, Everything That Can Expire, focuses on lifespan. To see more of his work, and to visit his portfolio site, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Matt Hendon
Matt Hendon, an illustrator and graphic designer, makes media works with a variety of inspiration sources. As he states, it runs from “minimal Swiss Design to Neo Rauch’s sort of surreal paintings to 1960’s / 70’s sports cars to architecture.” His works are about juxtaposition and unlikely combinations.
As Hendon describes the art process for his works, “Getting started on creating an image I usually have some sort of graphic idea on how I want to break up the space and a rough 3 or more color palette that interest me.  I save a lot of used paper, construction paper, magazine clippings and my own drawings use them collage a basic frame work to get started.  I also use a lot of spray paint, an airbrush, prisma pencil and pastels to create gradients and texture.  I go through a ton of matte medium and friskette to mask off areas to keep clean edges in particular spots.  Depending on the assignment I will then scan in what I’ve worked on to finish digitally.”
His most recent work, Everything That Can Expire, focuses on lifespan. To see more of his work, and to visit his portfolio site, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Matt Hendon
Matt Hendon, an illustrator and graphic designer, makes media works with a variety of inspiration sources. As he states, it runs from “minimal Swiss Design to Neo Rauch’s sort of surreal paintings to 1960’s / 70’s sports cars to architecture.” His works are about juxtaposition and unlikely combinations.
As Hendon describes the art process for his works, “Getting started on creating an image I usually have some sort of graphic idea on how I want to break up the space and a rough 3 or more color palette that interest me.  I save a lot of used paper, construction paper, magazine clippings and my own drawings use them collage a basic frame work to get started.  I also use a lot of spray paint, an airbrush, prisma pencil and pastels to create gradients and texture.  I go through a ton of matte medium and friskette to mask off areas to keep clean edges in particular spots.  Depending on the assignment I will then scan in what I’ve worked on to finish digitally.”
His most recent work, Everything That Can Expire, focuses on lifespan. To see more of his work, and to visit his portfolio site, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Adam Robertson
Adam Robertson, a textile and graphic designer from Norwich, makes works using systems that express data as patterns. With a background in design, the focus of his works carry a practical edge to go with the theory. Recently, he invented a new way to interpret time. “I have designed and made an application that express time as series of coloured concentric circles. With this piece, I wanted to create something that was visually exciting and constantly changing pattern, while still being an useable clock.” To check out his TimeVisual Clock for android, click here. To see more of Robertson’s design work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Adam Robertson
Adam Robertson, a textile and graphic designer from Norwich, makes works using systems that express data as patterns. With a background in design, the focus of his works carry a practical edge to go with the theory. Recently, he invented a new way to interpret time. “I have designed and made an application that express time as series of coloured concentric circles. With this piece, I wanted to create something that was visually exciting and constantly changing pattern, while still being an useable clock.” To check out his TimeVisual Clock for android, click here. To see more of Robertson’s design work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Adam Robertson
Adam Robertson, a textile and graphic designer from Norwich, makes works using systems that express data as patterns. With a background in design, the focus of his works carry a practical edge to go with the theory. Recently, he invented a new way to interpret time. “I have designed and made an application that express time as series of coloured concentric circles. With this piece, I wanted to create something that was visually exciting and constantly changing pattern, while still being an useable clock.” To check out his TimeVisual Clock for android, click here. To see more of Robertson’s design work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Adam Robertson
Adam Robertson, a textile and graphic designer from Norwich, makes works using systems that express data as patterns. With a background in design, the focus of his works carry a practical edge to go with the theory. Recently, he invented a new way to interpret time. “I have designed and made an application that express time as series of coloured concentric circles. With this piece, I wanted to create something that was visually exciting and constantly changing pattern, while still being an useable clock.” To check out his TimeVisual Clock for android, click here. To see more of Robertson’s design work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ollie Lucas
Ollie Lucas started out as a graphic designer but, with inspiration from the street art of Melbourne, began creating works with a more organic edge. As he describes the progression, 
"Exposure to the graffiti scene in Melbourne has made me question harmony in my work, I have a love for filthy, dirty and weathered paint splattered surfaces, but at the same time I crave clean, modern, hardline geometrics. This is what drives my practice, combining two visual elements that are polar opposites in search for a harmony that I may never obtain."
His most recent works, made on large recycled cable spools, focus on the arbitrariness of the signs we use to communicate. His works revolve around the phenomenon of pareidolia, the human tendency to see objects in clouds or recognisable objects in patterns or surfaces. In this way, his works are mostly up for our interpretation. For more on Lucas’s artworks, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ollie Lucas
Ollie Lucas started out as a graphic designer but, with inspiration from the street art of Melbourne, began creating works with a more organic edge. As he describes the progression, 
"Exposure to the graffiti scene in Melbourne has made me question harmony in my work, I have a love for filthy, dirty and weathered paint splattered surfaces, but at the same time I crave clean, modern, hardline geometrics. This is what drives my practice, combining two visual elements that are polar opposites in search for a harmony that I may never obtain."
His most recent works, made on large recycled cable spools, focus on the arbitrariness of the signs we use to communicate. His works revolve around the phenomenon of pareidolia, the human tendency to see objects in clouds or recognisable objects in patterns or surfaces. In this way, his works are mostly up for our interpretation. For more on Lucas’s artworks, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ollie Lucas
Ollie Lucas started out as a graphic designer but, with inspiration from the street art of Melbourne, began creating works with a more organic edge. As he describes the progression, 
"Exposure to the graffiti scene in Melbourne has made me question harmony in my work, I have a love for filthy, dirty and weathered paint splattered surfaces, but at the same time I crave clean, modern, hardline geometrics. This is what drives my practice, combining two visual elements that are polar opposites in search for a harmony that I may never obtain."
His most recent works, made on large recycled cable spools, focus on the arbitrariness of the signs we use to communicate. His works revolve around the phenomenon of pareidolia, the human tendency to see objects in clouds or recognisable objects in patterns or surfaces. In this way, his works are mostly up for our interpretation. For more on Lucas’s artworks, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ollie Lucas
Ollie Lucas started out as a graphic designer but, with inspiration from the street art of Melbourne, began creating works with a more organic edge. As he describes the progression, 
"Exposure to the graffiti scene in Melbourne has made me question harmony in my work, I have a love for filthy, dirty and weathered paint splattered surfaces, but at the same time I crave clean, modern, hardline geometrics. This is what drives my practice, combining two visual elements that are polar opposites in search for a harmony that I may never obtain."
His most recent works, made on large recycled cable spools, focus on the arbitrariness of the signs we use to communicate. His works revolve around the phenomenon of pareidolia, the human tendency to see objects in clouds or recognisable objects in patterns or surfaces. In this way, his works are mostly up for our interpretation. For more on Lucas’s artworks, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ollie Lucas
Ollie Lucas started out as a graphic designer but, with inspiration from the street art of Melbourne, began creating works with a more organic edge. As he describes the progression, 
"Exposure to the graffiti scene in Melbourne has made me question harmony in my work, I have a love for filthy, dirty and weathered paint splattered surfaces, but at the same time I crave clean, modern, hardline geometrics. This is what drives my practice, combining two visual elements that are polar opposites in search for a harmony that I may never obtain."
His most recent works, made on large recycled cable spools, focus on the arbitrariness of the signs we use to communicate. His works revolve around the phenomenon of pareidolia, the human tendency to see objects in clouds or recognisable objects in patterns or surfaces. In this way, his works are mostly up for our interpretation. For more on Lucas’s artworks, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ollie Lucas
Ollie Lucas started out as a graphic designer but, with inspiration from the street art of Melbourne, began creating works with a more organic edge. As he describes the progression, 
"Exposure to the graffiti scene in Melbourne has made me question harmony in my work, I have a love for filthy, dirty and weathered paint splattered surfaces, but at the same time I crave clean, modern, hardline geometrics. This is what drives my practice, combining two visual elements that are polar opposites in search for a harmony that I may never obtain."
His most recent works, made on large recycled cable spools, focus on the arbitrariness of the signs we use to communicate. His works revolve around the phenomenon of pareidolia, the human tendency to see objects in clouds or recognisable objects in patterns or surfaces. In this way, his works are mostly up for our interpretation. For more on Lucas’s artworks, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ollie Lucas
Ollie Lucas started out as a graphic designer but, with inspiration from the street art of Melbourne, began creating works with a more organic edge. As he describes the progression, 
"Exposure to the graffiti scene in Melbourne has made me question harmony in my work, I have a love for filthy, dirty and weathered paint splattered surfaces, but at the same time I crave clean, modern, hardline geometrics. This is what drives my practice, combining two visual elements that are polar opposites in search for a harmony that I may never obtain."
His most recent works, made on large recycled cable spools, focus on the arbitrariness of the signs we use to communicate. His works revolve around the phenomenon of pareidolia, the human tendency to see objects in clouds or recognisable objects in patterns or surfaces. In this way, his works are mostly up for our interpretation. For more on Lucas’s artworks, click here. 
- Lee Jones

Contact Us

For submissions: please send images and a detailed description to our editor, Lee Jones, at leejones@artandsciencejournal.com.
Thank you and have a lovely day!