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Chris Drury
 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.
 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.
 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.
 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/
 - Adrian Deen
Chris Drury
 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.
 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.
 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.
 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/
 - Adrian Deen
Chris Drury
 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.
 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.
 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.
 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/
 - Adrian Deen
Chris Drury
 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.
 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.
 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.
 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/
 - Adrian Deen

Chris Drury

 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.

 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.

 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.

 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/

 - Adrian Deen

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

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