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Amy Commins
Amy Commins makes works about hypernature—the idea that human design has brought nature to the extreme. As Commins describes this idea,
"Take for example a well manicured garden, man-made beaches and any manufactured landscapes—they are all simulations of nature, and they are better than the real thing. It is becoming increasingly more difficult to distinguish between what is real and what is not."
This also ties into her other focus on plant domestication and genetic engineering. Commins is interested in human intervention and the manipulated processes of selection—whereby plants are changed at the genetic level in order to accentuate traits that benefit humans. In her works, Commins uses source images on these themes and uses them for her illustrations. She has recently published the zine ‘A Well-Manicured Garden,’ which ties into the themes within her artwork. To see more of her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amy Commins
Amy Commins makes works about hypernature—the idea that human design has brought nature to the extreme. As Commins describes this idea,
"Take for example a well manicured garden, man-made beaches and any manufactured landscapes—they are all simulations of nature, and they are better than the real thing. It is becoming increasingly more difficult to distinguish between what is real and what is not."
This also ties into her other focus on plant domestication and genetic engineering. Commins is interested in human intervention and the manipulated processes of selection—whereby plants are changed at the genetic level in order to accentuate traits that benefit humans. In her works, Commins uses source images on these themes and uses them for her illustrations. She has recently published the zine ‘A Well-Manicured Garden,’ which ties into the themes within her artwork. To see more of her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amy Commins
Amy Commins makes works about hypernature—the idea that human design has brought nature to the extreme. As Commins describes this idea,
"Take for example a well manicured garden, man-made beaches and any manufactured landscapes—they are all simulations of nature, and they are better than the real thing. It is becoming increasingly more difficult to distinguish between what is real and what is not."
This also ties into her other focus on plant domestication and genetic engineering. Commins is interested in human intervention and the manipulated processes of selection—whereby plants are changed at the genetic level in order to accentuate traits that benefit humans. In her works, Commins uses source images on these themes and uses them for her illustrations. She has recently published the zine ‘A Well-Manicured Garden,’ which ties into the themes within her artwork. To see more of her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amy Commins
Amy Commins makes works about hypernature—the idea that human design has brought nature to the extreme. As Commins describes this idea,
"Take for example a well manicured garden, man-made beaches and any manufactured landscapes—they are all simulations of nature, and they are better than the real thing. It is becoming increasingly more difficult to distinguish between what is real and what is not."
This also ties into her other focus on plant domestication and genetic engineering. Commins is interested in human intervention and the manipulated processes of selection—whereby plants are changed at the genetic level in order to accentuate traits that benefit humans. In her works, Commins uses source images on these themes and uses them for her illustrations. She has recently published the zine ‘A Well-Manicured Garden,’ which ties into the themes within her artwork. To see more of her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ernst Haeckel
Here’s one from the history books. Ernst Haeckel was a German of many trades including, but not limited to, the following: biologist, naturalist, philosopher, physician, professor and artist. Through his books such as Kunstformen der Natur, “Art Forms of Nature,” Haeckel categorized and identified many new species while also showing the beauty to be found in nature. He is also know for spreading Charles Darwin’s work throughout Germany. For more on Haeckel, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ernst Haeckel
Here’s one from the history books. Ernst Haeckel was a German of many trades including, but not limited to, the following: biologist, naturalist, philosopher, physician, professor and artist. Through his books such as Kunstformen der Natur, “Art Forms of Nature,” Haeckel categorized and identified many new species while also showing the beauty to be found in nature. He is also know for spreading Charles Darwin’s work throughout Germany. For more on Haeckel, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ernst Haeckel
Here’s one from the history books. Ernst Haeckel was a German of many trades including, but not limited to, the following: biologist, naturalist, philosopher, physician, professor and artist. Through his books such as Kunstformen der Natur, “Art Forms of Nature,” Haeckel categorized and identified many new species while also showing the beauty to be found in nature. He is also know for spreading Charles Darwin’s work throughout Germany. For more on Haeckel, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ernst Haeckel
Here’s one from the history books. Ernst Haeckel was a German of many trades including, but not limited to, the following: biologist, naturalist, philosopher, physician, professor and artist. Through his books such as Kunstformen der Natur, “Art Forms of Nature,” Haeckel categorized and identified many new species while also showing the beauty to be found in nature. He is also know for spreading Charles Darwin’s work throughout Germany. For more on Haeckel, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Ernst Haeckel
Here’s one from the history books. Ernst Haeckel was a German of many trades including, but not limited to, the following: biologist, naturalist, philosopher, physician, professor and artist. Through his books such as Kunstformen der Natur, “Art Forms of Nature,” Haeckel categorized and identified many new species while also showing the beauty to be found in nature. He is also know for spreading Charles Darwin’s work throughout Germany. For more on Haeckel, click here. 
- Lee Jones

Ernst Haeckel

Here’s one from the history books. Ernst Haeckel was a German of many trades including, but not limited to, the following: biologist, naturalist, philosopher, physician, professor and artist. Through his books such as Kunstformen der Natur, “Art Forms of Nature,” Haeckel categorized and identified many new species while also showing the beauty to be found in nature. He is also know for spreading Charles Darwin’s work throughout Germany. For more on Haeckel, click here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ art science biology ernst haeckel lee jones illustration
Anita Goldstein
Anita Goldstein, an artist and graphic designer from Cambridge, makes works that combine nature and art. As the artist states, 
"[my works] celebrate both modern culture and the beauty of nature, making a collection of “Chimeras” – a new species. Every animal communicates with modern culture in a different way. The result is a digital art collages creating a modern culture and nature mash-up.”
Goldstein makes her works with photoshop; first scanning the web for source images and then combining them with different media. Currently, she is working on a solo show of digital and hand-drawn illustrations of girls and women in a style inspired by Egon Schiele. For more on Goldstein’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Anita Goldstein
Anita Goldstein, an artist and graphic designer from Cambridge, makes works that combine nature and art. As the artist states, 
"[my works] celebrate both modern culture and the beauty of nature, making a collection of “Chimeras” – a new species. Every animal communicates with modern culture in a different way. The result is a digital art collages creating a modern culture and nature mash-up.”
Goldstein makes her works with photoshop; first scanning the web for source images and then combining them with different media. Currently, she is working on a solo show of digital and hand-drawn illustrations of girls and women in a style inspired by Egon Schiele. For more on Goldstein’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Tristan Perich’s Machine Drawings
These drawings by artist and musician Tristan Perich are made by a machine-powered pen. Perich, who considers the sometimes opposing principles of randomness and order his “raw materials,”  looks to create images born both of control and uncertainty. He describes his work:
"The machine creates pen drawings that have a mechanical precision. It can run indefinitely, usually creating works that would take multiple days of non-stop drawing…At the same time, the system itself is delicate. The final drawings have a nervousness of a pen that a computer simulation alone cannot emulate. It is this balance between the code and the pen that excites me most, for the drawings couldn’t be made without the code, and the code couldn’t create the drawings on its own."
Perich’s drawings in this way offer an artistic consideration of the limits of both technological, mechanical outputs and purely manual, human processes; what sort of potential exists between these two types of creation?
See more of Perich’s work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Amberlee Rosolowich
Amberlee Rosolowich’s most recent works have been influenced by her youth. As she describes, her “work is inspired by a hidden and quiet side of my childhood; juxtaposing peculiar and darker experiences with the imaginary protection of animals. Fearful moments, made brighter by sharing and understanding secrets with animal ‘friends’. These paintings of life moments are augmented and playfully set along with current stories of my present. In some pieces the animals themselves are able to share the emotions that often seem minute.” 
Rosolowich’s mother worked as a zookeeper and aquarium show diver, and the artist became interested in animal behaviour early on. As she states, “I imagined these animals as my chit-chat friends. I spent many of my younger years pretending they would protect me in opposing moments and that they could understand the parts of my mind and heart that I kept quiet.” Rosolowich’s works are at the same time fanciful and behaviour oriented. To see more of her works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amberlee Rosolowich
Amberlee Rosolowich’s most recent works have been influenced by her youth. As she describes, her “work is inspired by a hidden and quiet side of my childhood; juxtaposing peculiar and darker experiences with the imaginary protection of animals. Fearful moments, made brighter by sharing and understanding secrets with animal ‘friends’. These paintings of life moments are augmented and playfully set along with current stories of my present. In some pieces the animals themselves are able to share the emotions that often seem minute.” 
Rosolowich’s mother worked as a zookeeper and aquarium show diver, and the artist became interested in animal behaviour early on. As she states, “I imagined these animals as my chit-chat friends. I spent many of my younger years pretending they would protect me in opposing moments and that they could understand the parts of my mind and heart that I kept quiet.” Rosolowich’s works are at the same time fanciful and behaviour oriented. To see more of her works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amberlee Rosolowich
Amberlee Rosolowich’s most recent works have been influenced by her youth. As she describes, her “work is inspired by a hidden and quiet side of my childhood; juxtaposing peculiar and darker experiences with the imaginary protection of animals. Fearful moments, made brighter by sharing and understanding secrets with animal ‘friends’. These paintings of life moments are augmented and playfully set along with current stories of my present. In some pieces the animals themselves are able to share the emotions that often seem minute.” 
Rosolowich’s mother worked as a zookeeper and aquarium show diver, and the artist became interested in animal behaviour early on. As she states, “I imagined these animals as my chit-chat friends. I spent many of my younger years pretending they would protect me in opposing moments and that they could understand the parts of my mind and heart that I kept quiet.” Rosolowich’s works are at the same time fanciful and behaviour oriented. To see more of her works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amberlee Rosolowich
Amberlee Rosolowich’s most recent works have been influenced by her youth. As she describes, her “work is inspired by a hidden and quiet side of my childhood; juxtaposing peculiar and darker experiences with the imaginary protection of animals. Fearful moments, made brighter by sharing and understanding secrets with animal ‘friends’. These paintings of life moments are augmented and playfully set along with current stories of my present. In some pieces the animals themselves are able to share the emotions that often seem minute.” 
Rosolowich’s mother worked as a zookeeper and aquarium show diver, and the artist became interested in animal behaviour early on. As she states, “I imagined these animals as my chit-chat friends. I spent many of my younger years pretending they would protect me in opposing moments and that they could understand the parts of my mind and heart that I kept quiet.” Rosolowich’s works are at the same time fanciful and behaviour oriented. To see more of her works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Reads and Zines with Fabian Wolf’s Death Lost His Bones in a Blind Alley
Fabian Wolf is a designer at Kingdrips, an independent design studio based in Hamburg St. Pauli, Germany, who recently turned to illustration. The 104 paged book looks into 24 stories from our real and imagined past. As Wolf describes the project,
"I have always had interests in presenting a world from the perspective of mankind, which finds its setting far back in a time that actually seems strange and fantastic for us as viewers. The social conflicts and fears at the time of the Middle Ages are very important to me. Legends and demons have always accompanied the history of mankind and in the Middle Ages they dominated everyday life. In the stories that are depicted in the book, I refer to real historical events and myths, which have been handed down to the present."
Wolf’s illustrations and writings have a raw look to them that adds to the spookiness of the stories. To see more of the book, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Reads and Zines with Fabian Wolf’s Death Lost His Bones in a Blind Alley
Fabian Wolf is a designer at Kingdrips, an independent design studio based in Hamburg St. Pauli, Germany, who recently turned to illustration. The 104 paged book looks into 24 stories from our real and imagined past. As Wolf describes the project,
"I have always had interests in presenting a world from the perspective of mankind, which finds its setting far back in a time that actually seems strange and fantastic for us as viewers. The social conflicts and fears at the time of the Middle Ages are very important to me. Legends and demons have always accompanied the history of mankind and in the Middle Ages they dominated everyday life. In the stories that are depicted in the book, I refer to real historical events and myths, which have been handed down to the present."
Wolf’s illustrations and writings have a raw look to them that adds to the spookiness of the stories. To see more of the book, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Reads and Zines with Fabian Wolf’s Death Lost His Bones in a Blind Alley
Fabian Wolf is a designer at Kingdrips, an independent design studio based in Hamburg St. Pauli, Germany, who recently turned to illustration. The 104 paged book looks into 24 stories from our real and imagined past. As Wolf describes the project,
"I have always had interests in presenting a world from the perspective of mankind, which finds its setting far back in a time that actually seems strange and fantastic for us as viewers. The social conflicts and fears at the time of the Middle Ages are very important to me. Legends and demons have always accompanied the history of mankind and in the Middle Ages they dominated everyday life. In the stories that are depicted in the book, I refer to real historical events and myths, which have been handed down to the present."
Wolf’s illustrations and writings have a raw look to them that adds to the spookiness of the stories. To see more of the book, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Kasia Jackowska
Kasia Jackowska’s Drawing Mathematics series whimsically illustrates various mathematical concepts as part of a project done for a brochure published by the University of Warsaw. Simple and sweet, these drawings add creativity to convention, using principles and formulas as her inspiration, and stylized animals as her muses. Can you recognize all the concepts?
See many more drawings and paintings by Jackowska at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Kasia Jackowska
Kasia Jackowska’s Drawing Mathematics series whimsically illustrates various mathematical concepts as part of a project done for a brochure published by the University of Warsaw. Simple and sweet, these drawings add creativity to convention, using principles and formulas as her inspiration, and stylized animals as her muses. Can you recognize all the concepts?
See many more drawings and paintings by Jackowska at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Kasia Jackowska
Kasia Jackowska’s Drawing Mathematics series whimsically illustrates various mathematical concepts as part of a project done for a brochure published by the University of Warsaw. Simple and sweet, these drawings add creativity to convention, using principles and formulas as her inspiration, and stylized animals as her muses. Can you recognize all the concepts?
See many more drawings and paintings by Jackowska at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Kasia Jackowska
Kasia Jackowska’s Drawing Mathematics series whimsically illustrates various mathematical concepts as part of a project done for a brochure published by the University of Warsaw. Simple and sweet, these drawings add creativity to convention, using principles and formulas as her inspiration, and stylized animals as her muses. Can you recognize all the concepts?
See many more drawings and paintings by Jackowska at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Kasia Jackowska
Kasia Jackowska’s Drawing Mathematics series whimsically illustrates various mathematical concepts as part of a project done for a brochure published by the University of Warsaw. Simple and sweet, these drawings add creativity to convention, using principles and formulas as her inspiration, and stylized animals as her muses. Can you recognize all the concepts?
See many more drawings and paintings by Jackowska at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Kasia Jackowska
Kasia Jackowska’s Drawing Mathematics series whimsically illustrates various mathematical concepts as part of a project done for a brochure published by the University of Warsaw. Simple and sweet, these drawings add creativity to convention, using principles and formulas as her inspiration, and stylized animals as her muses. Can you recognize all the concepts?
See many more drawings and paintings by Jackowska at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
In the Artist’s Studio with Betty Liang
I recently got to visit artist and cartoonist Betty Liang in her studio in Ottawa. Liang’s works are cute with an eerie twist. She’s recently been featured in zines such as š!, and makes some herself! During my visit we discussed horror literature and graphic novels; watched a crime documentary and ate some homemade chili. 
What do you like to create?
I mostly draw. I think it might be partly due to the fact that drawing is really coming back in vogue so I’ve been really exposed to that through the internet and in art school. I also think it’s because I love comics. I guess I’ve mostly been making comics recently, but I love printmaking and would like to dabble more in video and film. There is something so satisfying about video and film after you’ve spent most of your life making static images.
What are the themes in your work?
I think a lot of it is really about interpersonal relationships and, at times, romantic relationships. I like these ideals we have unintentionally built up around our interactions with each other, not even necessarily through our consumption of media, but simply through daily interactions. We have such a limited understanding of anything outside of our individual perspectives (if any at all) and I think we often like filling in the blanks like how to see a series of static, seperate images in a comic and can interpret that as a story.
List your top ten influences.
My top 10 influences in no particular order: Edward Gorey, Angela Carter, Hermann Hesse’s “Demian” (even though it’s certainly not a book of genius, I read it at an impressionable age and time so it definitely got me to think about the world differently after reading it), shoujo manga, Tove Jansson, the Pre-Raphaelites, Tarkovsky, genre films from the late 60s and early 70s, and this might sound cheesy, but it’s true, all the people I surround myself with, but in particular my art friends.
 I just thought of this, but I guess the movie “Barbarella” kind of had a big impact on me when I first saw that! That’s 11, oops.
 What are you working on right now?
Right now I am working on quite a few comics and I am thinking of starting a series of drawings based on old family photos. I’ve been thinking a lot of my Chinese heritage lately. It’s kind of sad for me to admit this, but I feel a really huge disconnect between my heritage and myself.
For more of Betty’s art click here. 
- Lee Jones
In the Artist’s Studio with Betty Liang
I recently got to visit artist and cartoonist Betty Liang in her studio in Ottawa. Liang’s works are cute with an eerie twist. She’s recently been featured in zines such as š!, and makes some herself! During my visit we discussed horror literature and graphic novels; watched a crime documentary and ate some homemade chili. 
What do you like to create?
I mostly draw. I think it might be partly due to the fact that drawing is really coming back in vogue so I’ve been really exposed to that through the internet and in art school. I also think it’s because I love comics. I guess I’ve mostly been making comics recently, but I love printmaking and would like to dabble more in video and film. There is something so satisfying about video and film after you’ve spent most of your life making static images.
What are the themes in your work?
I think a lot of it is really about interpersonal relationships and, at times, romantic relationships. I like these ideals we have unintentionally built up around our interactions with each other, not even necessarily through our consumption of media, but simply through daily interactions. We have such a limited understanding of anything outside of our individual perspectives (if any at all) and I think we often like filling in the blanks like how to see a series of static, seperate images in a comic and can interpret that as a story.
List your top ten influences.
My top 10 influences in no particular order: Edward Gorey, Angela Carter, Hermann Hesse’s “Demian” (even though it’s certainly not a book of genius, I read it at an impressionable age and time so it definitely got me to think about the world differently after reading it), shoujo manga, Tove Jansson, the Pre-Raphaelites, Tarkovsky, genre films from the late 60s and early 70s, and this might sound cheesy, but it’s true, all the people I surround myself with, but in particular my art friends.
 I just thought of this, but I guess the movie “Barbarella” kind of had a big impact on me when I first saw that! That’s 11, oops.
 What are you working on right now?
Right now I am working on quite a few comics and I am thinking of starting a series of drawings based on old family photos. I’ve been thinking a lot of my Chinese heritage lately. It’s kind of sad for me to admit this, but I feel a really huge disconnect between my heritage and myself.
For more of Betty’s art click here. 
- Lee Jones
In the Artist’s Studio with Betty Liang
I recently got to visit artist and cartoonist Betty Liang in her studio in Ottawa. Liang’s works are cute with an eerie twist. She’s recently been featured in zines such as š!, and makes some herself! During my visit we discussed horror literature and graphic novels; watched a crime documentary and ate some homemade chili. 
What do you like to create?
I mostly draw. I think it might be partly due to the fact that drawing is really coming back in vogue so I’ve been really exposed to that through the internet and in art school. I also think it’s because I love comics. I guess I’ve mostly been making comics recently, but I love printmaking and would like to dabble more in video and film. There is something so satisfying about video and film after you’ve spent most of your life making static images.
What are the themes in your work?
I think a lot of it is really about interpersonal relationships and, at times, romantic relationships. I like these ideals we have unintentionally built up around our interactions with each other, not even necessarily through our consumption of media, but simply through daily interactions. We have such a limited understanding of anything outside of our individual perspectives (if any at all) and I think we often like filling in the blanks like how to see a series of static, seperate images in a comic and can interpret that as a story.
List your top ten influences.
My top 10 influences in no particular order: Edward Gorey, Angela Carter, Hermann Hesse’s “Demian” (even though it’s certainly not a book of genius, I read it at an impressionable age and time so it definitely got me to think about the world differently after reading it), shoujo manga, Tove Jansson, the Pre-Raphaelites, Tarkovsky, genre films from the late 60s and early 70s, and this might sound cheesy, but it’s true, all the people I surround myself with, but in particular my art friends.
 I just thought of this, but I guess the movie “Barbarella” kind of had a big impact on me when I first saw that! That’s 11, oops.
 What are you working on right now?
Right now I am working on quite a few comics and I am thinking of starting a series of drawings based on old family photos. I’ve been thinking a lot of my Chinese heritage lately. It’s kind of sad for me to admit this, but I feel a really huge disconnect between my heritage and myself.
For more of Betty’s art click here. 
- Lee Jones
In the Artist’s Studio with Betty Liang
I recently got to visit artist and cartoonist Betty Liang in her studio in Ottawa. Liang’s works are cute with an eerie twist. She’s recently been featured in zines such as š!, and makes some herself! During my visit we discussed horror literature and graphic novels; watched a crime documentary and ate some homemade chili. 
What do you like to create?
I mostly draw. I think it might be partly due to the fact that drawing is really coming back in vogue so I’ve been really exposed to that through the internet and in art school. I also think it’s because I love comics. I guess I’ve mostly been making comics recently, but I love printmaking and would like to dabble more in video and film. There is something so satisfying about video and film after you’ve spent most of your life making static images.
What are the themes in your work?
I think a lot of it is really about interpersonal relationships and, at times, romantic relationships. I like these ideals we have unintentionally built up around our interactions with each other, not even necessarily through our consumption of media, but simply through daily interactions. We have such a limited understanding of anything outside of our individual perspectives (if any at all) and I think we often like filling in the blanks like how to see a series of static, seperate images in a comic and can interpret that as a story.
List your top ten influences.
My top 10 influences in no particular order: Edward Gorey, Angela Carter, Hermann Hesse’s “Demian” (even though it’s certainly not a book of genius, I read it at an impressionable age and time so it definitely got me to think about the world differently after reading it), shoujo manga, Tove Jansson, the Pre-Raphaelites, Tarkovsky, genre films from the late 60s and early 70s, and this might sound cheesy, but it’s true, all the people I surround myself with, but in particular my art friends.
 I just thought of this, but I guess the movie “Barbarella” kind of had a big impact on me when I first saw that! That’s 11, oops.
 What are you working on right now?
Right now I am working on quite a few comics and I am thinking of starting a series of drawings based on old family photos. I’ve been thinking a lot of my Chinese heritage lately. It’s kind of sad for me to admit this, but I feel a really huge disconnect between my heritage and myself.
For more of Betty’s art click here. 
- Lee Jones
In the Artist’s Studio with Betty Liang
I recently got to visit artist and cartoonist Betty Liang in her studio in Ottawa. Liang’s works are cute with an eerie twist. She’s recently been featured in zines such as š!, and makes some herself! During my visit we discussed horror literature and graphic novels; watched a crime documentary and ate some homemade chili. 
What do you like to create?
I mostly draw. I think it might be partly due to the fact that drawing is really coming back in vogue so I’ve been really exposed to that through the internet and in art school. I also think it’s because I love comics. I guess I’ve mostly been making comics recently, but I love printmaking and would like to dabble more in video and film. There is something so satisfying about video and film after you’ve spent most of your life making static images.
What are the themes in your work?
I think a lot of it is really about interpersonal relationships and, at times, romantic relationships. I like these ideals we have unintentionally built up around our interactions with each other, not even necessarily through our consumption of media, but simply through daily interactions. We have such a limited understanding of anything outside of our individual perspectives (if any at all) and I think we often like filling in the blanks like how to see a series of static, seperate images in a comic and can interpret that as a story.
List your top ten influences.
My top 10 influences in no particular order: Edward Gorey, Angela Carter, Hermann Hesse’s “Demian” (even though it’s certainly not a book of genius, I read it at an impressionable age and time so it definitely got me to think about the world differently after reading it), shoujo manga, Tove Jansson, the Pre-Raphaelites, Tarkovsky, genre films from the late 60s and early 70s, and this might sound cheesy, but it’s true, all the people I surround myself with, but in particular my art friends.
 I just thought of this, but I guess the movie “Barbarella” kind of had a big impact on me when I first saw that! That’s 11, oops.
 What are you working on right now?
Right now I am working on quite a few comics and I am thinking of starting a series of drawings based on old family photos. I’ve been thinking a lot of my Chinese heritage lately. It’s kind of sad for me to admit this, but I feel a really huge disconnect between my heritage and myself.
For more of Betty’s art click here. 
- Lee Jones
In the Artist’s Studio with Betty Liang
I recently got to visit artist and cartoonist Betty Liang in her studio in Ottawa. Liang’s works are cute with an eerie twist. She’s recently been featured in zines such as š!, and makes some herself! During my visit we discussed horror literature and graphic novels; watched a crime documentary and ate some homemade chili. 
What do you like to create?
I mostly draw. I think it might be partly due to the fact that drawing is really coming back in vogue so I’ve been really exposed to that through the internet and in art school. I also think it’s because I love comics. I guess I’ve mostly been making comics recently, but I love printmaking and would like to dabble more in video and film. There is something so satisfying about video and film after you’ve spent most of your life making static images.
What are the themes in your work?
I think a lot of it is really about interpersonal relationships and, at times, romantic relationships. I like these ideals we have unintentionally built up around our interactions with each other, not even necessarily through our consumption of media, but simply through daily interactions. We have such a limited understanding of anything outside of our individual perspectives (if any at all) and I think we often like filling in the blanks like how to see a series of static, seperate images in a comic and can interpret that as a story.
List your top ten influences.
My top 10 influences in no particular order: Edward Gorey, Angela Carter, Hermann Hesse’s “Demian” (even though it’s certainly not a book of genius, I read it at an impressionable age and time so it definitely got me to think about the world differently after reading it), shoujo manga, Tove Jansson, the Pre-Raphaelites, Tarkovsky, genre films from the late 60s and early 70s, and this might sound cheesy, but it’s true, all the people I surround myself with, but in particular my art friends.
 I just thought of this, but I guess the movie “Barbarella” kind of had a big impact on me when I first saw that! That’s 11, oops.
 What are you working on right now?
Right now I am working on quite a few comics and I am thinking of starting a series of drawings based on old family photos. I’ve been thinking a lot of my Chinese heritage lately. It’s kind of sad for me to admit this, but I feel a really huge disconnect between my heritage and myself.
For more of Betty’s art click here. 
- Lee Jones
In the Artist’s Studio with Betty Liang
I recently got to visit artist and cartoonist Betty Liang in her studio in Ottawa. Liang’s works are cute with an eerie twist. She’s recently been featured in zines such as š!, and makes some herself! During my visit we discussed horror literature and graphic novels; watched a crime documentary and ate some homemade chili. 
What do you like to create?
I mostly draw. I think it might be partly due to the fact that drawing is really coming back in vogue so I’ve been really exposed to that through the internet and in art school. I also think it’s because I love comics. I guess I’ve mostly been making comics recently, but I love printmaking and would like to dabble more in video and film. There is something so satisfying about video and film after you’ve spent most of your life making static images.
What are the themes in your work?
I think a lot of it is really about interpersonal relationships and, at times, romantic relationships. I like these ideals we have unintentionally built up around our interactions with each other, not even necessarily through our consumption of media, but simply through daily interactions. We have such a limited understanding of anything outside of our individual perspectives (if any at all) and I think we often like filling in the blanks like how to see a series of static, seperate images in a comic and can interpret that as a story.
List your top ten influences.
My top 10 influences in no particular order: Edward Gorey, Angela Carter, Hermann Hesse’s “Demian” (even though it’s certainly not a book of genius, I read it at an impressionable age and time so it definitely got me to think about the world differently after reading it), shoujo manga, Tove Jansson, the Pre-Raphaelites, Tarkovsky, genre films from the late 60s and early 70s, and this might sound cheesy, but it’s true, all the people I surround myself with, but in particular my art friends.
 I just thought of this, but I guess the movie “Barbarella” kind of had a big impact on me when I first saw that! That’s 11, oops.
 What are you working on right now?
Right now I am working on quite a few comics and I am thinking of starting a series of drawings based on old family photos. I’ve been thinking a lot of my Chinese heritage lately. It’s kind of sad for me to admit this, but I feel a really huge disconnect between my heritage and myself.
For more of Betty’s art click here. 
- Lee Jones
In the Artist’s Studio with Betty Liang
I recently got to visit artist and cartoonist Betty Liang in her studio in Ottawa. Liang’s works are cute with an eerie twist. She’s recently been featured in zines such as š!, and makes some herself! During my visit we discussed horror literature and graphic novels; watched a crime documentary and ate some homemade chili. 
What do you like to create?
I mostly draw. I think it might be partly due to the fact that drawing is really coming back in vogue so I’ve been really exposed to that through the internet and in art school. I also think it’s because I love comics. I guess I’ve mostly been making comics recently, but I love printmaking and would like to dabble more in video and film. There is something so satisfying about video and film after you’ve spent most of your life making static images.
What are the themes in your work?
I think a lot of it is really about interpersonal relationships and, at times, romantic relationships. I like these ideals we have unintentionally built up around our interactions with each other, not even necessarily through our consumption of media, but simply through daily interactions. We have such a limited understanding of anything outside of our individual perspectives (if any at all) and I think we often like filling in the blanks like how to see a series of static, seperate images in a comic and can interpret that as a story.
List your top ten influences.
My top 10 influences in no particular order: Edward Gorey, Angela Carter, Hermann Hesse’s “Demian” (even though it’s certainly not a book of genius, I read it at an impressionable age and time so it definitely got me to think about the world differently after reading it), shoujo manga, Tove Jansson, the Pre-Raphaelites, Tarkovsky, genre films from the late 60s and early 70s, and this might sound cheesy, but it’s true, all the people I surround myself with, but in particular my art friends.
 I just thought of this, but I guess the movie “Barbarella” kind of had a big impact on me when I first saw that! That’s 11, oops.
 What are you working on right now?
Right now I am working on quite a few comics and I am thinking of starting a series of drawings based on old family photos. I’ve been thinking a lot of my Chinese heritage lately. It’s kind of sad for me to admit this, but I feel a really huge disconnect between my heritage and myself.
For more of Betty’s art click here. 
- Lee Jones
In the Artist’s Studio with Betty Liang
I recently got to visit artist and cartoonist Betty Liang in her studio in Ottawa. Liang’s works are cute with an eerie twist. She’s recently been featured in zines such as š!, and makes some herself! During my visit we discussed horror literature and graphic novels; watched a crime documentary and ate some homemade chili. 
What do you like to create?
I mostly draw. I think it might be partly due to the fact that drawing is really coming back in vogue so I’ve been really exposed to that through the internet and in art school. I also think it’s because I love comics. I guess I’ve mostly been making comics recently, but I love printmaking and would like to dabble more in video and film. There is something so satisfying about video and film after you’ve spent most of your life making static images.
What are the themes in your work?
I think a lot of it is really about interpersonal relationships and, at times, romantic relationships. I like these ideals we have unintentionally built up around our interactions with each other, not even necessarily through our consumption of media, but simply through daily interactions. We have such a limited understanding of anything outside of our individual perspectives (if any at all) and I think we often like filling in the blanks like how to see a series of static, seperate images in a comic and can interpret that as a story.
List your top ten influences.
My top 10 influences in no particular order: Edward Gorey, Angela Carter, Hermann Hesse’s “Demian” (even though it’s certainly not a book of genius, I read it at an impressionable age and time so it definitely got me to think about the world differently after reading it), shoujo manga, Tove Jansson, the Pre-Raphaelites, Tarkovsky, genre films from the late 60s and early 70s, and this might sound cheesy, but it’s true, all the people I surround myself with, but in particular my art friends.
 I just thought of this, but I guess the movie “Barbarella” kind of had a big impact on me when I first saw that! That’s 11, oops.
 What are you working on right now?
Right now I am working on quite a few comics and I am thinking of starting a series of drawings based on old family photos. I’ve been thinking a lot of my Chinese heritage lately. It’s kind of sad for me to admit this, but I feel a really huge disconnect between my heritage and myself.
For more of Betty’s art click here. 
- Lee Jones
In the Artist’s Studio with Betty Liang
I recently got to visit artist and cartoonist Betty Liang in her studio in Ottawa. Liang’s works are cute with an eerie twist. She’s recently been featured in zines such as š!, and makes some herself! During my visit we discussed horror literature and graphic novels; watched a crime documentary and ate some homemade chili. 
What do you like to create?
I mostly draw. I think it might be partly due to the fact that drawing is really coming back in vogue so I’ve been really exposed to that through the internet and in art school. I also think it’s because I love comics. I guess I’ve mostly been making comics recently, but I love printmaking and would like to dabble more in video and film. There is something so satisfying about video and film after you’ve spent most of your life making static images.
What are the themes in your work?
I think a lot of it is really about interpersonal relationships and, at times, romantic relationships. I like these ideals we have unintentionally built up around our interactions with each other, not even necessarily through our consumption of media, but simply through daily interactions. We have such a limited understanding of anything outside of our individual perspectives (if any at all) and I think we often like filling in the blanks like how to see a series of static, seperate images in a comic and can interpret that as a story.
List your top ten influences.
My top 10 influences in no particular order: Edward Gorey, Angela Carter, Hermann Hesse’s “Demian” (even though it’s certainly not a book of genius, I read it at an impressionable age and time so it definitely got me to think about the world differently after reading it), shoujo manga, Tove Jansson, the Pre-Raphaelites, Tarkovsky, genre films from the late 60s and early 70s, and this might sound cheesy, but it’s true, all the people I surround myself with, but in particular my art friends.
 I just thought of this, but I guess the movie “Barbarella” kind of had a big impact on me when I first saw that! That’s 11, oops.
 What are you working on right now?
Right now I am working on quite a few comics and I am thinking of starting a series of drawings based on old family photos. I’ve been thinking a lot of my Chinese heritage lately. It’s kind of sad for me to admit this, but I feel a really huge disconnect between my heritage and myself.
For more of Betty’s art click here. 
- Lee Jones

In the Artist’s Studio with Betty Liang

I recently got to visit artist and cartoonist Betty Liang in her studio in Ottawa. Liang’s works are cute with an eerie twist. She’s recently been featured in zines such as š!, and makes some herself! During my visit we discussed horror literature and graphic novels; watched a crime documentary and ate some homemade chili. 

What do you like to create?

I mostly draw. I think it might be partly due to the fact that drawing is really coming back in vogue so I’ve been really exposed to that through the internet and in art school. I also think it’s because I love comics. I guess I’ve mostly been making comics recently, but I love printmaking and would like to dabble more in video and film. There is something so satisfying about video and film after you’ve spent most of your life making static images.

What are the themes in your work?

I think a lot of it is really about interpersonal relationships and, at times, romantic relationships. I like these ideals we have unintentionally built up around our interactions with each other, not even necessarily through our consumption of media, but simply through daily interactions. We have such a limited understanding of anything outside of our individual perspectives (if any at all) and I think we often like filling in the blanks like how to see a series of static, seperate images in a comic and can interpret that as a story.

List your top ten influences.

My top 10 influences in no particular order: Edward Gorey, Angela Carter, Hermann Hesse’s “Demian” (even though it’s certainly not a book of genius, I read it at an impressionable age and time so it definitely got me to think about the world differently after reading it), shoujo manga, Tove Jansson, the Pre-Raphaelites, Tarkovsky, genre films from the late 60s and early 70s, and this might sound cheesy, but it’s true, all the people I surround myself with, but in particular my art friends.

 I just thought of this, but I guess the movie “Barbarella” kind of had a big impact on me when I first saw that! That’s 11, oops.

 What are you working on right now?

Right now I am working on quite a few comics and I am thinking of starting a series of drawings based on old family photos. I’ve been thinking a lot of my Chinese heritage lately. It’s kind of sad for me to admit this, but I feel a really huge disconnect between my heritage and myself.

For more of Betty’s art click here

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

10 Photos
/ art artist on tumblr in the artist's studio betty liang cartoon illustration lee jones
Caitlin Ashton
Caitlin Ashton is an illustrator who found inspiration from the wilderness for her recent work Hide and Seek. As she describes,
“I decided to go to woods and spend a day entirely alone and see what happened. I left myself open to whatever narrative struck me whilst I was there. I spent the day creating imagery from and with my surroundings and my reaction to them. Over the day the woodland varied from being completely empty, to having fellow walkers coming through, who I decided to hide from. The narrative, about someone hiding in the woods but leaving a trail to be found, developed from that. I took all my findings back to the studio and developed it from there. The project culminated in pictoral maps and a print narrative, made up of loose cards allowing the reader to follow the story as I intended it to be, or rearranging it to make their own.”
Currently, Ashton is working on a series about play in the woods. For more on her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Caitlin Ashton
Caitlin Ashton is an illustrator who found inspiration from the wilderness for her recent work Hide and Seek. As she describes,
“I decided to go to woods and spend a day entirely alone and see what happened. I left myself open to whatever narrative struck me whilst I was there. I spent the day creating imagery from and with my surroundings and my reaction to them. Over the day the woodland varied from being completely empty, to having fellow walkers coming through, who I decided to hide from. The narrative, about someone hiding in the woods but leaving a trail to be found, developed from that. I took all my findings back to the studio and developed it from there. The project culminated in pictoral maps and a print narrative, made up of loose cards allowing the reader to follow the story as I intended it to be, or rearranging it to make their own.”
Currently, Ashton is working on a series about play in the woods. For more on her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Caitlin Ashton
Caitlin Ashton is an illustrator who found inspiration from the wilderness for her recent work Hide and Seek. As she describes,
“I decided to go to woods and spend a day entirely alone and see what happened. I left myself open to whatever narrative struck me whilst I was there. I spent the day creating imagery from and with my surroundings and my reaction to them. Over the day the woodland varied from being completely empty, to having fellow walkers coming through, who I decided to hide from. The narrative, about someone hiding in the woods but leaving a trail to be found, developed from that. I took all my findings back to the studio and developed it from there. The project culminated in pictoral maps and a print narrative, made up of loose cards allowing the reader to follow the story as I intended it to be, or rearranging it to make their own.”
Currently, Ashton is working on a series about play in the woods. For more on her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Adam Batchelor
Adam Batchelor, an illustrator from Norwich, makes artworks about our modernizing world. As he describes his influences,
"My work explores the breakdown and conflict between humanity, the man-made and the natural world, and looks into the ever rapid transition of developing cultures, I take influence from social injustices and global imbalances that invite you to question the world around you. I introduce themes of capitalism and consumerism into the work and highlight the threat these have on global issues such as the rights for Indigenous people, animals, corruption, health and conflict."
And on his past work, “It was more involved in portraying a dichotomy between western world values and developing & tribal cultures by adorning the subject with western products. More recently i have been either looking into much deeper and intricate issues within the subject or refining my original concept with more abstract meaning and objects, for instance earlier this year i made a series titled perpetuations, that aimed to explore the relationship the camera has with groups of people living within developing or remote countries. By using the camera to highlight certain global issues such as Human Safaris, tourism, media ethics, industries and economies, I was also able to look at how new technologies begin to shape, change and replace pre-existing traditions and cultures in non-western worlds.”
For more of Batchelor’s art, click here.
- Lee Jones 
Adam Batchelor
Adam Batchelor, an illustrator from Norwich, makes artworks about our modernizing world. As he describes his influences,
"My work explores the breakdown and conflict between humanity, the man-made and the natural world, and looks into the ever rapid transition of developing cultures, I take influence from social injustices and global imbalances that invite you to question the world around you. I introduce themes of capitalism and consumerism into the work and highlight the threat these have on global issues such as the rights for Indigenous people, animals, corruption, health and conflict."
And on his past work, “It was more involved in portraying a dichotomy between western world values and developing & tribal cultures by adorning the subject with western products. More recently i have been either looking into much deeper and intricate issues within the subject or refining my original concept with more abstract meaning and objects, for instance earlier this year i made a series titled perpetuations, that aimed to explore the relationship the camera has with groups of people living within developing or remote countries. By using the camera to highlight certain global issues such as Human Safaris, tourism, media ethics, industries and economies, I was also able to look at how new technologies begin to shape, change and replace pre-existing traditions and cultures in non-western worlds.”
For more of Batchelor’s art, click here.
- Lee Jones 

Adam Batchelor

Adam Batchelor, an illustrator from Norwich, makes artworks about our modernizing world. As he describes his influences,

"My work explores the breakdown and conflict between humanity, the man-made and the natural world, and looks into the ever rapid transition of developing cultures, I take influence from social injustices and global imbalances that invite you to question the world around you. I introduce themes of capitalism and consumerism into the work and highlight the threat these have on global issues such as the rights for Indigenous people, animals, corruption, health and conflict."

And on his past work, “It was more involved in portraying a dichotomy between western world values and developing & tribal cultures by adorning the subject with western products. More recently i have been either looking into much deeper and intricate issues within the subject or refining my original concept with more abstract meaning and objects, for instance earlier this year i made a series titled perpetuations, that aimed to explore the relationship the camera has with groups of people living within developing or remote countries. By using the camera to highlight certain global issues such as Human Safaris, tourism, media ethics, industries and economies, I was also able to look at how new technologies begin to shape, change and replace pre-existing traditions and cultures in non-western worlds.

For more of Batchelor’s art, click here.

- Lee Jones 

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ art science illustration modernization adam batchelor lee jones

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