Our Blog

Posts tagged insects

Categories:

BUZZ: Insects As Art
Insects may be pests, but they are important not only for our environment, but also great inspirations for artistic expressions.
A few months ago there was an exhibit at Ottawa’s Gallery 101 called BUZZ: Getting to Know Other Animals, curated by Laura Margita, which explored insects as both specimen and art, featuring the works of Kimberly Edgar, Deborah Margo, Bioni Samp, and Amy Swartz, with borrowed specimens from the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes (CNC).
Thorough research and creative expression came together, juxtaposing scientific names and species groups with artistic titles and aesthetical organization.
Kimberly Edgar’s work was used to tell a story through her drawings, which as she stated “forces her to analyze them aesthetically, so that she is no longer thinking about them fearfully, but learning to appreciate them as beautiful and interesting; and that drawing them allows her to cross that fine line between revulsion and fascination”.
The work of Deborah Margo created a garden in the gallery space as a form of experiment, where the work “[stimulated] bodies and minds by combining creative experimentation, ecological sustainability, and nourishment for two specific animal species: bees and cultural workers”. Working specifically with those two entities in mind created a piece which formed a dialogue between social and ecological systems.
Bioni Samp performed at the Canadian Museum of Nature, where he exhibited his DJ-skills combining music and bee frequencies, to raise awareness on the plight of bees.
Amy Swartz created intricate installations, similar to the display cases on loan from the CNC, which “[explored] the idea of obsession — not only in the practice of art, but also in humanity’s perceived control over nature, life, and death”. Juxtaposing her specimens with the ones from the CNC was deliberate, to make one “consider how the gaze of the scientist and the gaze of the artist may differ in regards to the animals they are studying”.
In general, the exhibit was not about getting over phobias of ‘creepy’ insects or merely admiring their natural patterns and colours, but about remembering the importance of even the smallest of organisms to our environment. It was a wake-up call to protect Canada’s biodiversity, celebrating the beauty and importance of these little creatures.
-Anna Paluch
BUZZ: Insects As Art
Insects may be pests, but they are important not only for our environment, but also great inspirations for artistic expressions.
A few months ago there was an exhibit at Ottawa’s Gallery 101 called BUZZ: Getting to Know Other Animals, curated by Laura Margita, which explored insects as both specimen and art, featuring the works of Kimberly Edgar, Deborah Margo, Bioni Samp, and Amy Swartz, with borrowed specimens from the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes (CNC).
Thorough research and creative expression came together, juxtaposing scientific names and species groups with artistic titles and aesthetical organization.
Kimberly Edgar’s work was used to tell a story through her drawings, which as she stated “forces her to analyze them aesthetically, so that she is no longer thinking about them fearfully, but learning to appreciate them as beautiful and interesting; and that drawing them allows her to cross that fine line between revulsion and fascination”.
The work of Deborah Margo created a garden in the gallery space as a form of experiment, where the work “[stimulated] bodies and minds by combining creative experimentation, ecological sustainability, and nourishment for two specific animal species: bees and cultural workers”. Working specifically with those two entities in mind created a piece which formed a dialogue between social and ecological systems.
Bioni Samp performed at the Canadian Museum of Nature, where he exhibited his DJ-skills combining music and bee frequencies, to raise awareness on the plight of bees.
Amy Swartz created intricate installations, similar to the display cases on loan from the CNC, which “[explored] the idea of obsession — not only in the practice of art, but also in humanity’s perceived control over nature, life, and death”. Juxtaposing her specimens with the ones from the CNC was deliberate, to make one “consider how the gaze of the scientist and the gaze of the artist may differ in regards to the animals they are studying”.
In general, the exhibit was not about getting over phobias of ‘creepy’ insects or merely admiring their natural patterns and colours, but about remembering the importance of even the smallest of organisms to our environment. It was a wake-up call to protect Canada’s biodiversity, celebrating the beauty and importance of these little creatures.
-Anna Paluch
BUZZ: Insects As Art
Insects may be pests, but they are important not only for our environment, but also great inspirations for artistic expressions.
A few months ago there was an exhibit at Ottawa’s Gallery 101 called BUZZ: Getting to Know Other Animals, curated by Laura Margita, which explored insects as both specimen and art, featuring the works of Kimberly Edgar, Deborah Margo, Bioni Samp, and Amy Swartz, with borrowed specimens from the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes (CNC).
Thorough research and creative expression came together, juxtaposing scientific names and species groups with artistic titles and aesthetical organization.
Kimberly Edgar’s work was used to tell a story through her drawings, which as she stated “forces her to analyze them aesthetically, so that she is no longer thinking about them fearfully, but learning to appreciate them as beautiful and interesting; and that drawing them allows her to cross that fine line between revulsion and fascination”.
The work of Deborah Margo created a garden in the gallery space as a form of experiment, where the work “[stimulated] bodies and minds by combining creative experimentation, ecological sustainability, and nourishment for two specific animal species: bees and cultural workers”. Working specifically with those two entities in mind created a piece which formed a dialogue between social and ecological systems.
Bioni Samp performed at the Canadian Museum of Nature, where he exhibited his DJ-skills combining music and bee frequencies, to raise awareness on the plight of bees.
Amy Swartz created intricate installations, similar to the display cases on loan from the CNC, which “[explored] the idea of obsession — not only in the practice of art, but also in humanity’s perceived control over nature, life, and death”. Juxtaposing her specimens with the ones from the CNC was deliberate, to make one “consider how the gaze of the scientist and the gaze of the artist may differ in regards to the animals they are studying”.
In general, the exhibit was not about getting over phobias of ‘creepy’ insects or merely admiring their natural patterns and colours, but about remembering the importance of even the smallest of organisms to our environment. It was a wake-up call to protect Canada’s biodiversity, celebrating the beauty and importance of these little creatures.
-Anna Paluch

BUZZ: Insects As Art

Insects may be pests, but they are important not only for our environment, but also great inspirations for artistic expressions.

A few months ago there was an exhibit at Ottawa’s Gallery 101 called BUZZ: Getting to Know Other Animals, curated by Laura Margita, which explored insects as both specimen and art, featuring the works of Kimberly Edgar, Deborah Margo, Bioni Samp, and Amy Swartz, with borrowed specimens from the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes (CNC).

Thorough research and creative expression came together, juxtaposing scientific names and species groups with artistic titles and aesthetical organization.

Kimberly Edgar’s work was used to tell a story through her drawings, which as she stated “forces her to analyze them aesthetically, so that she is no longer thinking about them fearfully, but learning to appreciate them as beautiful and interesting; and that drawing them allows her to cross that fine line between revulsion and fascination”.

The work of Deborah Margo created a garden in the gallery space as a form of experiment, where the work “[stimulated] bodies and minds by combining creative experimentation, ecological sustainability, and nourishment for two specific animal species: bees and cultural workers”. Working specifically with those two entities in mind created a piece which formed a dialogue between social and ecological systems.

Bioni Samp performed at the Canadian Museum of Nature, where he exhibited his DJ-skills combining music and bee frequencies, to raise awareness on the plight of bees.

Amy Swartz created intricate installations, similar to the display cases on loan from the CNC, which “[explored] the idea of obsession — not only in the practice of art, but also in humanity’s perceived control over nature, life, and death”. Juxtaposing her specimens with the ones from the CNC was deliberate, to make one “consider how the gaze of the scientist and the gaze of the artist may differ in regards to the animals they are studying”.

In general, the exhibit was not about getting over phobias of ‘creepy’ insects or merely admiring their natural patterns and colours, but about remembering the importance of even the smallest of organisms to our environment. It was a wake-up call to protect Canada’s biodiversity, celebrating the beauty and importance of these little creatures.

-Anna Paluch

3 Photos
/ anna paluch deborah margo bioni samp laura margita gallery 101 ottawa ottawa art BUZZ kimberly edgar amy swartz Canadian National Collection of Insects insects bees art science art and science journal Environment ecology biodiversity
Bug Balls by Claire Moynihan
Not everyone has the ability to enjoy the intricate beauty that is insects and various other little creepy crawlies, because most people just find them, well, creepy. Insects and gastropods, such as the snail, can be intimidating when in a pack or swarm, but on their own there is so much to be in awe of, whether it’s the explosion of colour on a butterfly’s wings, or wondering how a shell can stay on a body, which looks like it could be made from gummy worms.
Artist Claire Moynihan allows us spectators to better study these intriguing beasts, but in a new way; through embroidery. That’s right! Moynihan creates insects and gastropods as anatomically correct as she possibly can, using only some thread. She mounts them on small little felt balls, and displays them in traditional entomological shadow boxes, like the specimens of old. Her little ‘bug balls’ are specific to the wildlife of the British Isles, but most are recognizable as international pests. Funny enough, Moynihan started her practice with just recreations of moths, aka, ‘moth balls’. 
Now, her collection has expanded; a real infestation if you will, but one I think anybody wouldn’t mind to have. As long as they don’t move!
- Anna Paluch 
Bug Balls by Claire Moynihan
Not everyone has the ability to enjoy the intricate beauty that is insects and various other little creepy crawlies, because most people just find them, well, creepy. Insects and gastropods, such as the snail, can be intimidating when in a pack or swarm, but on their own there is so much to be in awe of, whether it’s the explosion of colour on a butterfly’s wings, or wondering how a shell can stay on a body, which looks like it could be made from gummy worms.
Artist Claire Moynihan allows us spectators to better study these intriguing beasts, but in a new way; through embroidery. That’s right! Moynihan creates insects and gastropods as anatomically correct as she possibly can, using only some thread. She mounts them on small little felt balls, and displays them in traditional entomological shadow boxes, like the specimens of old. Her little ‘bug balls’ are specific to the wildlife of the British Isles, but most are recognizable as international pests. Funny enough, Moynihan started her practice with just recreations of moths, aka, ‘moth balls’. 
Now, her collection has expanded; a real infestation if you will, but one I think anybody wouldn’t mind to have. As long as they don’t move!
- Anna Paluch 

Bug Balls by Claire Moynihan

Not everyone has the ability to enjoy the intricate beauty that is insects and various other little creepy crawlies, because most people just find them, well, creepy. Insects and gastropods, such as the snail, can be intimidating when in a pack or swarm, but on their own there is so much to be in awe of, whether it’s the explosion of colour on a butterfly’s wings, or wondering how a shell can stay on a body, which looks like it could be made from gummy worms.

Artist Claire Moynihan allows us spectators to better study these intriguing beasts, but in a new way; through embroidery. That’s right! Moynihan creates insects and gastropods as anatomically correct as she possibly can, using only some thread. She mounts them on small little felt balls, and displays them in traditional entomological shadow boxes, like the specimens of old. Her little ‘bug balls’ are specific to the wildlife of the British Isles, but most are recognizable as international pests. Funny enough, Moynihan started her practice with just recreations of moths, aka, ‘moth balls’.

Now, her collection has expanded; a real infestation if you will, but one I think anybody wouldn’t mind to have. As long as they don’t move!

- Anna Paluch 

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ claire moynihan bug balls embroidery insects gastropods art science anna paluch art and science journal bugs
Amy Swartz
In this series, Pests, Amy Swartz made thousands of miniature sculptures made of insect specimens, toy figuring parts and drawings. As Swartz describes how the series started,
“Pest began a few months after my mother died while I was pregnant with my first child. I found a dead dragonfly in my house shortly after she died.  The insect was so still and yet looked alive that it reminded me of the life and death duality I was experiencing.  I saved it and began to collect more dead insects.  Then one day I found some toy soldiers with heads and arms that had fallen off (from an old childhood collection). Comparing the fine details in both the natural and artificial parts, I connected toy arms to a dragonfly and immediately began to imagine a world of these creatures.”
As Swartz creates this series, she describes herself as feeling like a contemporary artist version of Dr. Frankenstein or Dr. Moreau. She’s feels like she has become obsessive about collecting parts, but this also speaks to another message behind her work— one of overpopulation, extinction and our own pest-like behavior as a species. To see more of the series and her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amy Swartz
In this series, Pests, Amy Swartz made thousands of miniature sculptures made of insect specimens, toy figuring parts and drawings. As Swartz describes how the series started,
“Pest began a few months after my mother died while I was pregnant with my first child. I found a dead dragonfly in my house shortly after she died.  The insect was so still and yet looked alive that it reminded me of the life and death duality I was experiencing.  I saved it and began to collect more dead insects.  Then one day I found some toy soldiers with heads and arms that had fallen off (from an old childhood collection). Comparing the fine details in both the natural and artificial parts, I connected toy arms to a dragonfly and immediately began to imagine a world of these creatures.”
As Swartz creates this series, she describes herself as feeling like a contemporary artist version of Dr. Frankenstein or Dr. Moreau. She’s feels like she has become obsessive about collecting parts, but this also speaks to another message behind her work— one of overpopulation, extinction and our own pest-like behavior as a species. To see more of the series and her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amy Swartz
In this series, Pests, Amy Swartz made thousands of miniature sculptures made of insect specimens, toy figuring parts and drawings. As Swartz describes how the series started,
“Pest began a few months after my mother died while I was pregnant with my first child. I found a dead dragonfly in my house shortly after she died.  The insect was so still and yet looked alive that it reminded me of the life and death duality I was experiencing.  I saved it and began to collect more dead insects.  Then one day I found some toy soldiers with heads and arms that had fallen off (from an old childhood collection). Comparing the fine details in both the natural and artificial parts, I connected toy arms to a dragonfly and immediately began to imagine a world of these creatures.”
As Swartz creates this series, she describes herself as feeling like a contemporary artist version of Dr. Frankenstein or Dr. Moreau. She’s feels like she has become obsessive about collecting parts, but this also speaks to another message behind her work— one of overpopulation, extinction and our own pest-like behavior as a species. To see more of the series and her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amy Swartz
In this series, Pests, Amy Swartz made thousands of miniature sculptures made of insect specimens, toy figuring parts and drawings. As Swartz describes how the series started,
“Pest began a few months after my mother died while I was pregnant with my first child. I found a dead dragonfly in my house shortly after she died.  The insect was so still and yet looked alive that it reminded me of the life and death duality I was experiencing.  I saved it and began to collect more dead insects.  Then one day I found some toy soldiers with heads and arms that had fallen off (from an old childhood collection). Comparing the fine details in both the natural and artificial parts, I connected toy arms to a dragonfly and immediately began to imagine a world of these creatures.”
As Swartz creates this series, she describes herself as feeling like a contemporary artist version of Dr. Frankenstein or Dr. Moreau. She’s feels like she has become obsessive about collecting parts, but this also speaks to another message behind her work— one of overpopulation, extinction and our own pest-like behavior as a species. To see more of the series and her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amy Swartz
In this series, Pests, Amy Swartz made thousands of miniature sculptures made of insect specimens, toy figuring parts and drawings. As Swartz describes how the series started,
“Pest began a few months after my mother died while I was pregnant with my first child. I found a dead dragonfly in my house shortly after she died.  The insect was so still and yet looked alive that it reminded me of the life and death duality I was experiencing.  I saved it and began to collect more dead insects.  Then one day I found some toy soldiers with heads and arms that had fallen off (from an old childhood collection). Comparing the fine details in both the natural and artificial parts, I connected toy arms to a dragonfly and immediately began to imagine a world of these creatures.”
As Swartz creates this series, she describes herself as feeling like a contemporary artist version of Dr. Frankenstein or Dr. Moreau. She’s feels like she has become obsessive about collecting parts, but this also speaks to another message behind her work— one of overpopulation, extinction and our own pest-like behavior as a species. To see more of the series and her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Amy Swartz
In this series, Pests, Amy Swartz made thousands of miniature sculptures made of insect specimens, toy figuring parts and drawings. As Swartz describes how the series started,
“Pest began a few months after my mother died while I was pregnant with my first child. I found a dead dragonfly in my house shortly after she died.  The insect was so still and yet looked alive that it reminded me of the life and death duality I was experiencing.  I saved it and began to collect more dead insects.  Then one day I found some toy soldiers with heads and arms that had fallen off (from an old childhood collection). Comparing the fine details in both the natural and artificial parts, I connected toy arms to a dragonfly and immediately began to imagine a world of these creatures.”
As Swartz creates this series, she describes herself as feeling like a contemporary artist version of Dr. Frankenstein or Dr. Moreau. She’s feels like she has become obsessive about collecting parts, but this also speaks to another message behind her work— one of overpopulation, extinction and our own pest-like behavior as a species. To see more of the series and her work, click here. 
- Lee Jones

Contact Us

Please include your email address