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Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck
Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.
Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.
For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.
- Victoria Nolte
Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck
Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.
Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.
For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.
- Victoria Nolte

Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck

Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.

Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.

For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.

- Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ art technology urban fiction 2.0 petra gemeinboeck locative media participatory art installation victoria nolte
Crushed Goods
Using the medium of porcelain, artist Lei Xue’s series Drinking Tea (2001-2003) may be read as a commentary on how the production of commodities impacts the environment. It is a cluster of crushed cans, the intricate blue images distorted by grooves and bends, crushed into indiscernible shapes.
The environmental impact of creating porcelain goods includes extensive fresh water usage. As a result, the water put into the ground or rivers cause pollution. As well, air-borne particles from the sanding down of shapes impair breathing within the factories. Quantities of fluorine and lead are also potentially prone to leaking into the water or soil, around porcelain factory grounds. There are attempts to make this process more sustainable though. A recent paper suggested that is it possible to recycle up to 80% of the original water used in making porcelain commodities, towards the productions of the next batch.
This is where the conceptual message of the piece goes deeper. Aluminum cans are recyclable, so why shouldn’t the process of creating porcelain goods (or any goods for that matter) be? The artist’s work echoes the consciousness of the new generation, a more eco-friendly generation, attempting to find equilibrium between commodity and conservation. It is a juxtaposition of tradition and evolution in the world of goods production.
-Anna Paluch
Crushed Goods
Using the medium of porcelain, artist Lei Xue’s series Drinking Tea (2001-2003) may be read as a commentary on how the production of commodities impacts the environment. It is a cluster of crushed cans, the intricate blue images distorted by grooves and bends, crushed into indiscernible shapes.
The environmental impact of creating porcelain goods includes extensive fresh water usage. As a result, the water put into the ground or rivers cause pollution. As well, air-borne particles from the sanding down of shapes impair breathing within the factories. Quantities of fluorine and lead are also potentially prone to leaking into the water or soil, around porcelain factory grounds. There are attempts to make this process more sustainable though. A recent paper suggested that is it possible to recycle up to 80% of the original water used in making porcelain commodities, towards the productions of the next batch.
This is where the conceptual message of the piece goes deeper. Aluminum cans are recyclable, so why shouldn’t the process of creating porcelain goods (or any goods for that matter) be? The artist’s work echoes the consciousness of the new generation, a more eco-friendly generation, attempting to find equilibrium between commodity and conservation. It is a juxtaposition of tradition and evolution in the world of goods production.
-Anna Paluch

Crushed Goods

Using the medium of porcelain, artist Lei Xue’s series Drinking Tea (2001-2003) may be read as a commentary on how the production of commodities impacts the environment. It is a cluster of crushed cans, the intricate blue images distorted by grooves and bends, crushed into indiscernible shapes.

The environmental impact of creating porcelain goods includes extensive fresh water usage. As a result, the water put into the ground or rivers cause pollution. As well, air-borne particles from the sanding down of shapes impair breathing within the factories. Quantities of fluorine and lead are also potentially prone to leaking into the water or soil, around porcelain factory grounds. There are attempts to make this process more sustainable though. A recent paper suggested that is it possible to recycle up to 80% of the original water used in making porcelain commodities, towards the productions of the next batch.

This is where the conceptual message of the piece goes deeper. Aluminum cans are recyclable, so why shouldn’t the process of creating porcelain goods (or any goods for that matter) be? The artist’s work echoes the consciousness of the new generation, a more eco-friendly generation, attempting to find equilibrium between commodity and conservation. It is a juxtaposition of tradition and evolution in the world of goods production.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ Lei Xue anna paluch porcelain installation Environment recycle art science art and science journal pollution
Quasar 2.0
Not being able to attend this past weekend’s Nuit Blanche in Toronto, I of course found myself last week in a fit of self pity, pouring over lists of the most anticipated projects to be shown. The remarkable image which headlines Canadian Art Magazine’s article on 10 Artists’ Nuit Blanche Tips & Tricks stopped me in my tracks. It shows Jean Michel Crettaz and Mark David Hosale’s Quasar 2.0: Star Incubator - a project from Nuit Blanche 2012 displayed in the parking garage of Nathan Philips Square for the Museum at the end of the world. The duo’s work didn’t make an appearance this year, but my curiosity was peaked. Crettaz and Hosale act as the founders of SLAP! with the Quasar Series beginning in 2007. 
The interactive, architectonic light and sound installations take their name from the astronomical phenomenon which are luminous sources of electromagnetic energy surrounding a supermassive black hole. Quasars were for some time a great mystery, and in the context of the installation represent the limitations of what can be seen and known. 
The intricate sculpture is supported by a metallic substructure drawing inspiration from quantum loops.  The main body is embedded with scores of micro-controllers and hundreds of LEDS which light up fibre optic strands that run through the sculpture. The structure is intended as a reflection on renewing and evolving life cycles - the activity of the structure as immediately visible to the eye is determined through the real time computing of converging data streams. The data which fuels the installation is pulled from a number of sources - there are sensors throughout the surrounding exhibition space that draw data from the immediate space, paired with distant celestial data. 
There is a fantastic video on the Making of Quasar 2.0 where you can hear from the artists themselves, as well as students who assisted them in the process. You can also find installation videos on youtube, like this one.
- Katherine Lawson

Quasar 2.0

Not being able to attend this past weekend’s Nuit Blanche in Toronto, I of course found myself last week in a fit of self pity, pouring over lists of the most anticipated projects to be shown. The remarkable image which headlines Canadian Art Magazine’s article on 10 Artists’ Nuit Blanche Tips & Tricks stopped me in my tracks. It shows Jean Michel Crettaz and Mark David Hosale’s Quasar 2.0: Star Incubator - a project from Nuit Blanche 2012 displayed in the parking garage of Nathan Philips Square for the Museum at the end of the world. The duo’s work didn’t make an appearance this year, but my curiosity was peaked. Crettaz and Hosale act as the founders of SLAP! with the Quasar Series beginning in 2007.

The interactive, architectonic light and sound installations take their name from the astronomical phenomenon which are luminous sources of electromagnetic energy surrounding a supermassive black hole. Quasars were for some time a great mystery, and in the context of the installation represent the limitations of what can be seen and known.

The intricate sculpture is supported by a metallic substructure drawing inspiration from quantum loops.  The main body is embedded with scores of micro-controllers and hundreds of LEDS which light up fibre optic strands that run through the sculpture. The structure is intended as a reflection on renewing and evolving life cycles - the activity of the structure as immediately visible to the eye is determined through the real time computing of converging data streams. The data which fuels the installation is pulled from a number of sources - there are sensors throughout the surrounding exhibition space that draw data from the immediate space, paired with distant celestial data. 

There is a fantastic video on the Making of Quasar 2.0 where you can hear from the artists themselves, as well as students who assisted them in the process. You can also find installation videos on youtube, like this one.

- Katherine Lawson

quasar 2.0 nuit blanche toronto katherine lawson jean michel crettaz mark david hosale technology art installation media science data
In Orbit
Last year, artist Tomás Saraceno stunned and captured audiences with his installation, On Space Time Foam, an interactive membranous structure suspended high above the ground.
This year, Saraceno has once again captured people’s imaginations with yet another floating dreamscape. The Argentinian artist’s latest creation, in orbit, is a vast interactive network of nets and spheres. The three levelled structure, built above the K21 Ständehaus’s piazza, sits more than 25 metres above the ground. Among the structure’s 2500 m2 of steel net are giant inflated spheres, measuring up to 8.5 metres in diameter. Despite the installation’s weightless appearance, in orbit’s net alone weighs 3000 kg and each sphere weighs 300 kg.
To create his spider web-like structure, Saraceno collaborated with engineers, architects, and arachnologists. The whole planning process spanned over three years.
For Saraceno, in orbit is a vast network of communication. As visitors explore the structure, their movements resonate through the net, allowing visitors to perceive space through vibrations, like spiders do.
Additionally, Saraceno’s work reminds him of “models of the universe that depict the forces of gravity and planetary bodies”.  He stated that, “[f]or me, the work visualizes the space-time continuum, the three-dimensional web of a spider, the ramifications of tissue in the brain, dark matter, or the structure of the universe. With ‘in orbit,’ proportions enter into new relationships; human bodies become planets, molecules, or social black holes” (Art Daily).
in orbit is expected to be on display at K21 Ständehaus until Fall 2014.
-Janine Truong
(Read more A&SJ features on Saraceno’s work: here and here)
In Orbit
Last year, artist Tomás Saraceno stunned and captured audiences with his installation, On Space Time Foam, an interactive membranous structure suspended high above the ground.
This year, Saraceno has once again captured people’s imaginations with yet another floating dreamscape. The Argentinian artist’s latest creation, in orbit, is a vast interactive network of nets and spheres. The three levelled structure, built above the K21 Ständehaus’s piazza, sits more than 25 metres above the ground. Among the structure’s 2500 m2 of steel net are giant inflated spheres, measuring up to 8.5 metres in diameter. Despite the installation’s weightless appearance, in orbit’s net alone weighs 3000 kg and each sphere weighs 300 kg.
To create his spider web-like structure, Saraceno collaborated with engineers, architects, and arachnologists. The whole planning process spanned over three years.
For Saraceno, in orbit is a vast network of communication. As visitors explore the structure, their movements resonate through the net, allowing visitors to perceive space through vibrations, like spiders do.
Additionally, Saraceno’s work reminds him of “models of the universe that depict the forces of gravity and planetary bodies”.  He stated that, “[f]or me, the work visualizes the space-time continuum, the three-dimensional web of a spider, the ramifications of tissue in the brain, dark matter, or the structure of the universe. With ‘in orbit,’ proportions enter into new relationships; human bodies become planets, molecules, or social black holes” (Art Daily).
in orbit is expected to be on display at K21 Ständehaus until Fall 2014.
-Janine Truong
(Read more A&SJ features on Saraceno’s work: here and here)
In Orbit
Last year, artist Tomás Saraceno stunned and captured audiences with his installation, On Space Time Foam, an interactive membranous structure suspended high above the ground.
This year, Saraceno has once again captured people’s imaginations with yet another floating dreamscape. The Argentinian artist’s latest creation, in orbit, is a vast interactive network of nets and spheres. The three levelled structure, built above the K21 Ständehaus’s piazza, sits more than 25 metres above the ground. Among the structure’s 2500 m2 of steel net are giant inflated spheres, measuring up to 8.5 metres in diameter. Despite the installation’s weightless appearance, in orbit’s net alone weighs 3000 kg and each sphere weighs 300 kg.
To create his spider web-like structure, Saraceno collaborated with engineers, architects, and arachnologists. The whole planning process spanned over three years.
For Saraceno, in orbit is a vast network of communication. As visitors explore the structure, their movements resonate through the net, allowing visitors to perceive space through vibrations, like spiders do.
Additionally, Saraceno’s work reminds him of “models of the universe that depict the forces of gravity and planetary bodies”.  He stated that, “[f]or me, the work visualizes the space-time continuum, the three-dimensional web of a spider, the ramifications of tissue in the brain, dark matter, or the structure of the universe. With ‘in orbit,’ proportions enter into new relationships; human bodies become planets, molecules, or social black holes” (Art Daily).
in orbit is expected to be on display at K21 Ständehaus until Fall 2014.
-Janine Truong
(Read more A&SJ features on Saraceno’s work: here and here)
In Orbit
Last year, artist Tomás Saraceno stunned and captured audiences with his installation, On Space Time Foam, an interactive membranous structure suspended high above the ground.
This year, Saraceno has once again captured people’s imaginations with yet another floating dreamscape. The Argentinian artist’s latest creation, in orbit, is a vast interactive network of nets and spheres. The three levelled structure, built above the K21 Ständehaus’s piazza, sits more than 25 metres above the ground. Among the structure’s 2500 m2 of steel net are giant inflated spheres, measuring up to 8.5 metres in diameter. Despite the installation’s weightless appearance, in orbit’s net alone weighs 3000 kg and each sphere weighs 300 kg.
To create his spider web-like structure, Saraceno collaborated with engineers, architects, and arachnologists. The whole planning process spanned over three years.
For Saraceno, in orbit is a vast network of communication. As visitors explore the structure, their movements resonate through the net, allowing visitors to perceive space through vibrations, like spiders do.
Additionally, Saraceno’s work reminds him of “models of the universe that depict the forces of gravity and planetary bodies”.  He stated that, “[f]or me, the work visualizes the space-time continuum, the three-dimensional web of a spider, the ramifications of tissue in the brain, dark matter, or the structure of the universe. With ‘in orbit,’ proportions enter into new relationships; human bodies become planets, molecules, or social black holes” (Art Daily).
in orbit is expected to be on display at K21 Ständehaus until Fall 2014.
-Janine Truong
(Read more A&SJ features on Saraceno’s work: here and here)

In Orbit

Last year, artist Tomás Saraceno stunned and captured audiences with his installation, On Space Time Foam, an interactive membranous structure suspended high above the ground.

This year, Saraceno has once again captured people’s imaginations with yet another floating dreamscape. The Argentinian artist’s latest creation, in orbit, is a vast interactive network of nets and spheres. The three levelled structure, built above the K21 Ständehaus’s piazza, sits more than 25 metres above the ground. Among the structure’s 2500 m2 of steel net are giant inflated spheres, measuring up to 8.5 metres in diameter. Despite the installation’s weightless appearance, in orbit’s net alone weighs 3000 kg and each sphere weighs 300 kg.

To create his spider web-like structure, Saraceno collaborated with engineers, architects, and arachnologists. The whole planning process spanned over three years.

For Saraceno, in orbit is a vast network of communication. As visitors explore the structure, their movements resonate through the net, allowing visitors to perceive space through vibrations, like spiders do.

Additionally, Saraceno’s work reminds him of “models of the universe that depict the forces of gravity and planetary bodies”.  He stated that, “[f]or me, the work visualizes the space-time continuum, the three-dimensional web of a spider, the ramifications of tissue in the brain, dark matter, or the structure of the universe. With ‘in orbit,’ proportions enter into new relationships; human bodies become planets, molecules, or social black holes” (Art Daily).

in orbit is expected to be on display at K21 Ständehaus until Fall 2014.

-Janine Truong

(Read more A&SJ features on Saraceno’s work: here and here)

4 Photos
/ in orbit tomas saraceno art and science spider web installation K21 Standehaus art science
Pink Punch
Pink Punch was created by architects Nicholas Croft and Michaela MacLeod for the Jardins de Métis International Garden Festival 2013. The striking colour of the installation is meant to draw visitors into the forest as well as separate the installation from the wild.
The pink rope surrounding each tree was wrapped using traditional tree wrapping, a method used to protect trees. The latex extends from about 10 feet above the ground to a radius of 3 to 4 feet around the base of the tree. There, the fluorescent rubber serves as a public seating area.
You can visit Pink Punch at the Jardins de Métis/Redford Gardens in Grand-Métis, Quebec until September 29, 2013.
(Source: Visuall)
-Janine Truong
Pink Punch
Pink Punch was created by architects Nicholas Croft and Michaela MacLeod for the Jardins de Métis International Garden Festival 2013. The striking colour of the installation is meant to draw visitors into the forest as well as separate the installation from the wild.
The pink rope surrounding each tree was wrapped using traditional tree wrapping, a method used to protect trees. The latex extends from about 10 feet above the ground to a radius of 3 to 4 feet around the base of the tree. There, the fluorescent rubber serves as a public seating area.
You can visit Pink Punch at the Jardins de Métis/Redford Gardens in Grand-Métis, Quebec until September 29, 2013.
(Source: Visuall)
-Janine Truong
Pink Punch
Pink Punch was created by architects Nicholas Croft and Michaela MacLeod for the Jardins de Métis International Garden Festival 2013. The striking colour of the installation is meant to draw visitors into the forest as well as separate the installation from the wild.
The pink rope surrounding each tree was wrapped using traditional tree wrapping, a method used to protect trees. The latex extends from about 10 feet above the ground to a radius of 3 to 4 feet around the base of the tree. There, the fluorescent rubber serves as a public seating area.
You can visit Pink Punch at the Jardins de Métis/Redford Gardens in Grand-Métis, Quebec until September 29, 2013.
(Source: Visuall)
-Janine Truong
Pink Punch
Pink Punch was created by architects Nicholas Croft and Michaela MacLeod for the Jardins de Métis International Garden Festival 2013. The striking colour of the installation is meant to draw visitors into the forest as well as separate the installation from the wild.
The pink rope surrounding each tree was wrapped using traditional tree wrapping, a method used to protect trees. The latex extends from about 10 feet above the ground to a radius of 3 to 4 feet around the base of the tree. There, the fluorescent rubber serves as a public seating area.
You can visit Pink Punch at the Jardins de Métis/Redford Gardens in Grand-Métis, Quebec until September 29, 2013.
(Source: Visuall)
-Janine Truong
Pink Punch
Pink Punch was created by architects Nicholas Croft and Michaela MacLeod for the Jardins de Métis International Garden Festival 2013. The striking colour of the installation is meant to draw visitors into the forest as well as separate the installation from the wild.
The pink rope surrounding each tree was wrapped using traditional tree wrapping, a method used to protect trees. The latex extends from about 10 feet above the ground to a radius of 3 to 4 feet around the base of the tree. There, the fluorescent rubber serves as a public seating area.
You can visit Pink Punch at the Jardins de Métis/Redford Gardens in Grand-Métis, Quebec until September 29, 2013.
(Source: Visuall)
-Janine Truong

Pink Punch

Pink Punch was created by architects Nicholas Croft and Michaela MacLeod for the Jardins de Métis International Garden Festival 2013. The striking colour of the installation is meant to draw visitors into the forest as well as separate the installation from the wild.

The pink rope surrounding each tree was wrapped using traditional tree wrapping, a method used to protect trees. The latex extends from about 10 feet above the ground to a radius of 3 to 4 feet around the base of the tree. There, the fluorescent rubber serves as a public seating area.

You can visit Pink Punch at the Jardins de Métis/Redford Gardens in Grand-Métis, Quebec until September 29, 2013.

(Source: Visuall)

-Janine Truong

5 Photos
/ Nicholas Croft Michaela MacLeod Pink Punch Les Jardins de Métis Redford Gardens installation art and science trees
Lifeline of a City
For many urban-dwellers, the subway is a vital part of our everyday lives. Sure, there are taxis, buses, bikes (and you can even walk if you really wanted to), but the subway system will forever be the most vital nerve of a city. Artist Takatsugu Kuriyama’s installation is a representation of one of the busiest subway systems, Tokyo, and displays it as a swirling set of tubes, pulsating with coloured fluids, like blood in our veins.
All the tunnels are shown, and it is amazing to see how they overlap, giving us an idea of how we travel within an urban space. There is a distinct artistic beauty in this urban landscape, that we never actually get to see, only experience.
The fluidity of the liquids in the tubes is even reminiscent of all the people, flowing in and out of the subway trains and stations. A visual representation of the inner-workings of a bustling metropolis!
-Anna Paluch

Lifeline of a City

For many urban-dwellers, the subway is a vital part of our everyday lives. Sure, there are taxis, buses, bikes (and you can even walk if you really wanted to), but the subway system will forever be the most vital nerve of a city. Artist Takatsugu Kuriyama’s installation is a representation of one of the busiest subway systems, Tokyo, and displays it as a swirling set of tubes, pulsating with coloured fluids, like blood in our veins.

All the tunnels are shown, and it is amazing to see how they overlap, giving us an idea of how we travel within an urban space. There is a distinct artistic beauty in this urban landscape, that we never actually get to see, only experience.

The fluidity of the liquids in the tubes is even reminiscent of all the people, flowing in and out of the subway trains and stations. A visual representation of the inner-workings of a bustling metropolis!

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Takatsugu Kuriyama anna paluch tokyo subway art science art and science journal installation 3D mapping tubes urban urban design
Lightning Strike: Sou Fujimoto’s Architecture

Lightning is something that frightens most people, with the booms of thunderclaps that accompany it, and the potential destruction it can cause when objects are struck. But lightning can also be beautiful to watch. Taking the dangerous element out of the natural phenomenon and only mimicking its beauty, architect Sou Fujimoto has constructed a giant cloud-like pavilion that recreates an electrical storm.


The pavilion itself, completely white and constructed out of 20mm steel poles, is huge. Covering 3800 square feet, the network of metal is impressive enough by itself during the day. But come night time, it becomes a geometric metal cloud that flashes LED lights in the same pattern as an electrical storm would take. The immersion of the installation is increased by the use of soundbites, timed to create the auditory effect of thunder after each ‘lightning strike’.
Fujimoto’s pavilion was commissioned by Serpentine Gallery, and the LED lights were commissioned and installed by United Visual Artists. Check out their website here.
-Lea Hamilton
Lightning Strike: Sou Fujimoto’s Architecture

Lightning is something that frightens most people, with the booms of thunderclaps that accompany it, and the potential destruction it can cause when objects are struck. But lightning can also be beautiful to watch. Taking the dangerous element out of the natural phenomenon and only mimicking its beauty, architect Sou Fujimoto has constructed a giant cloud-like pavilion that recreates an electrical storm.


The pavilion itself, completely white and constructed out of 20mm steel poles, is huge. Covering 3800 square feet, the network of metal is impressive enough by itself during the day. But come night time, it becomes a geometric metal cloud that flashes LED lights in the same pattern as an electrical storm would take. The immersion of the installation is increased by the use of soundbites, timed to create the auditory effect of thunder after each ‘lightning strike’.
Fujimoto’s pavilion was commissioned by Serpentine Gallery, and the LED lights were commissioned and installed by United Visual Artists. Check out their website here.
-Lea Hamilton
Lightning Strike: Sou Fujimoto’s Architecture

Lightning is something that frightens most people, with the booms of thunderclaps that accompany it, and the potential destruction it can cause when objects are struck. But lightning can also be beautiful to watch. Taking the dangerous element out of the natural phenomenon and only mimicking its beauty, architect Sou Fujimoto has constructed a giant cloud-like pavilion that recreates an electrical storm.


The pavilion itself, completely white and constructed out of 20mm steel poles, is huge. Covering 3800 square feet, the network of metal is impressive enough by itself during the day. But come night time, it becomes a geometric metal cloud that flashes LED lights in the same pattern as an electrical storm would take. The immersion of the installation is increased by the use of soundbites, timed to create the auditory effect of thunder after each ‘lightning strike’.
Fujimoto’s pavilion was commissioned by Serpentine Gallery, and the LED lights were commissioned and installed by United Visual Artists. Check out their website here.
-Lea Hamilton
Lightning Strike: Sou Fujimoto’s Architecture

Lightning is something that frightens most people, with the booms of thunderclaps that accompany it, and the potential destruction it can cause when objects are struck. But lightning can also be beautiful to watch. Taking the dangerous element out of the natural phenomenon and only mimicking its beauty, architect Sou Fujimoto has constructed a giant cloud-like pavilion that recreates an electrical storm.


The pavilion itself, completely white and constructed out of 20mm steel poles, is huge. Covering 3800 square feet, the network of metal is impressive enough by itself during the day. But come night time, it becomes a geometric metal cloud that flashes LED lights in the same pattern as an electrical storm would take. The immersion of the installation is increased by the use of soundbites, timed to create the auditory effect of thunder after each ‘lightning strike’.
Fujimoto’s pavilion was commissioned by Serpentine Gallery, and the LED lights were commissioned and installed by United Visual Artists. Check out their website here.
-Lea Hamilton

Lightning Strike: Sou Fujimoto’s Architecture


Lightning is something that frightens most people, with the booms of thunderclaps that accompany it, and the potential destruction it can cause when objects are struck. But lightning can also be beautiful to watch. Taking the dangerous element out of the natural phenomenon and only mimicking its beauty, architect Sou Fujimoto has constructed a giant cloud-like pavilion that recreates an electrical storm.


image

The pavilion itself, completely white and constructed out of 20mm steel poles, is huge. Covering 3800 square feet, the network of metal is impressive enough by itself during the day. But come night time, it becomes a geometric metal cloud that flashes LED lights in the same pattern as an electrical storm would take. The immersion of the installation is increased by the use of soundbites, timed to create the auditory effect of thunder after each ‘lightning strike’.

Fujimoto’s pavilion was commissioned by Serpentine Gallery, and the LED lights were commissioned and installed by United Visual Artists. Check out their website here.

-Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ lightning installation Sou Fujimoto UVA Lea Hamilton art electricity nature

Mobile Performance: Social Media Usage in Kasia Molga’s The… 

The mobile nature of smartphones and related devices sees everyday life as a series of performances. In a world where a “social media presence” is just as important as a presence in “real” life, mobile technology now dictates everything from what we eat (so we can put it on Instagram) to who we hang out with (so we can tag them on Facebook). When we follow any particular social media feed, we witness this series of performances in a constant stream. 
This constant connection to our mobile world questions the authenticity of our thoughts and experiences. If life events are essentially performed for the sake of a tweet, to what extent are they genuine? Have we stopped “doing for the sake of living” in order to create more seemingly dynamic and exciting experiences? Are we, therefore, actually living or just catering to the attentions of our audience? 
One way we can consider the effects of social media is through its intersection with the contemporary art world. Social media has allowed us to connect with galleries and artists on this performative level, receiving information and inspiration from these sources on a daily basis. Galleries become proprietors of art world knowledge and we can practically discover their collections and content without actually visiting them. In addition, many contemporary artists have employed social media in their own works. Web artist Brian Piana’s Ellsworth Kelly Hacked My Twitter, for example, is a real-time collage made from the tweets by people the artist follows on Twitter. The tweets are reduced to a representational colour (based from the user’s avatar) and placed on a grid that represents every individual tweet that has come through the artist’s Twitter feed. Through this generative work, Piana exposes social media as both a device to cultivate a digital presence, and as a device that can simultaneously reduce the value of one’s message to a wall of anonymous colour. 
Based on feeds from Twitter, Kasia Molga’s interactive installation, The… explores the idea of social media as a mobile performance and questions the authenticity of our collective thought process. Inspired by David Bohm’s concept of the origins of thought, Molga is interested in determining if our own thoughts are purely influenced by the ideas of others. In Molga’s installation, each tweet represents an “original” thought. Her employment of social media is essential to this project because it presents a seemingly thoughtless stream of messages that burdens the viewer with the task of deciphering true original content. 
The… is generated with the use of a Kinect controller that detects the body shapes of the gallery’s visitors. A set of algorithms pulls tweets that feature a specific hashtag from a live Twitter feed. The tweets float for a few seconds above the bodily shapes on screen, interacting with the viewers’ gestures. The tweets become conversational pieces and viewers can theoretically alter what appears on the screen by sending another tweet with the chosen hashtag. 
Digital media is an important medium in Molga’s art practice, which seeks to deal with the “aesthetics of interconnectedness.” This state of interconnectivity allows for a constant awareness of the thoughts, feelings, and experiences of those around us. By performing a mobile persona cultivated through social media, we are always constructing and re-constructing the stories of our lives. Our followers, often friends, family, and co-workers, are therefore privy to our everyday experiences without even conversing with us. 
More information about Kaisa Molga’s work can be found on her website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Mobile Performance is a reoccurring A&SJ series that explores contemporary digital art practices with a particular focus on the use of mobile technologies. This article is the first edition of the series. 

Mobile Performance: Social Media Usage in Kasia Molga’s The… 

The mobile nature of smartphones and related devices sees everyday life as a series of performances. In a world where a “social media presence” is just as important as a presence in “real” life, mobile technology now dictates everything from what we eat (so we can put it on Instagram) to who we hang out with (so we can tag them on Facebook). When we follow any particular social media feed, we witness this series of performances in a constant stream. 

This constant connection to our mobile world questions the authenticity of our thoughts and experiences. If life events are essentially performed for the sake of a tweet, to what extent are they genuine? Have we stopped “doing for the sake of living” in order to create more seemingly dynamic and exciting experiences? Are we, therefore, actually living or just catering to the attentions of our audience? 

One way we can consider the effects of social media is through its intersection with the contemporary art world. Social media has allowed us to connect with galleries and artists on this performative level, receiving information and inspiration from these sources on a daily basis. Galleries become proprietors of art world knowledge and we can practically discover their collections and content without actually visiting them. In addition, many contemporary artists have employed social media in their own works. Web artist Brian Piana’s Ellsworth Kelly Hacked My Twitter, for example, is a real-time collage made from the tweets by people the artist follows on Twitter. The tweets are reduced to a representational colour (based from the user’s avatar) and placed on a grid that represents every individual tweet that has come through the artist’s Twitter feed. Through this generative work, Piana exposes social media as both a device to cultivate a digital presence, and as a device that can simultaneously reduce the value of one’s message to a wall of anonymous colour. 

Based on feeds from Twitter, Kasia Molga’s interactive installation, The… explores the idea of social media as a mobile performance and questions the authenticity of our collective thought process. Inspired by David Bohm’s concept of the origins of thought, Molga is interested in determining if our own thoughts are purely influenced by the ideas of others. In Molga’s installation, each tweet represents an “original” thought. Her employment of social media is essential to this project because it presents a seemingly thoughtless stream of messages that burdens the viewer with the task of deciphering true original content. 

The… is generated with the use of a Kinect controller that detects the body shapes of the gallery’s visitors. A set of algorithms pulls tweets that feature a specific hashtag from a live Twitter feed. The tweets float for a few seconds above the bodily shapes on screen, interacting with the viewers’ gestures. The tweets become conversational pieces and viewers can theoretically alter what appears on the screen by sending another tweet with the chosen hashtag. 

Digital media is an important medium in Molga’s art practice, which seeks to deal with the “aesthetics of interconnectedness.” This state of interconnectivity allows for a constant awareness of the thoughts, feelings, and experiences of those around us. By performing a mobile persona cultivated through social media, we are always constructing and re-constructing the stories of our lives. Our followers, often friends, family, and co-workers, are therefore privy to our everyday experiences without even conversing with us. 

More information about Kaisa Molga’s work can be found on her website

Victoria Nolte

Mobile Performance is a reoccurring A&SJ series that explores contemporary digital art practices with a particular focus on the use of mobile technologies. This article is the first edition of the series. 

art installation social media mobile performance twitter kasia molga victoria nolte
99 Red Beacons by Britta Evans-Fenton
Today’s widespread use of the Internet and evolving forms of digital and social media has allowed us to be constantly plugged into our various communicative devices. This dependence on the web has essentially blurred the lines between the individual and the collective. As our devices allow us to become digital beacons, we shed our anonymity and remain in constant contact with the world around us.
Where would we be without the Internet?
With many of these issues in mind, Ottawa-based artist Britta Evans-Fenton (who we have featured on our blog before) has proposed an installation/performance piece that highlights the ubiquity of digital communication and sheds light on the unusual history of the Internet. The installation will be part of this year’s installment of Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau. 
Britta’s inspiration for this project comes from the German Cold War protest song, “99 Luftballons” by Nena. As Britta discovered in her research, the technology that has developed into the World Wide Web was originally developed through Cold War military funding. The song references the military’s influence over lines of communication and comments on the paranoia and hysteria associated with war.
99 Red Beacons is a roaming installation featuring 99 blinking red balloons. Volunteers will carry the balloons around the city as they emit anonymous Morse code messages written by members of the Canadian Armed Forces. The physical presence of the balloons, gliding in the air, is likened to the image of the millions of messages that “float” through the air as they travel between phones, computers, tablets, and e-readers. In this sense, the balloons serve as a reminder of the prevalence of digital messaging, while the messages written by Canadian soldiers refer to the Internet’s origins as a military-funded form of communication.
Look for 99 Red Beacons on September 21, 2013 during Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau!
- Victoria Nolte
99 Red Beacons by Britta Evans-Fenton
Today’s widespread use of the Internet and evolving forms of digital and social media has allowed us to be constantly plugged into our various communicative devices. This dependence on the web has essentially blurred the lines between the individual and the collective. As our devices allow us to become digital beacons, we shed our anonymity and remain in constant contact with the world around us.
Where would we be without the Internet?
With many of these issues in mind, Ottawa-based artist Britta Evans-Fenton (who we have featured on our blog before) has proposed an installation/performance piece that highlights the ubiquity of digital communication and sheds light on the unusual history of the Internet. The installation will be part of this year’s installment of Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau. 
Britta’s inspiration for this project comes from the German Cold War protest song, “99 Luftballons” by Nena. As Britta discovered in her research, the technology that has developed into the World Wide Web was originally developed through Cold War military funding. The song references the military’s influence over lines of communication and comments on the paranoia and hysteria associated with war.
99 Red Beacons is a roaming installation featuring 99 blinking red balloons. Volunteers will carry the balloons around the city as they emit anonymous Morse code messages written by members of the Canadian Armed Forces. The physical presence of the balloons, gliding in the air, is likened to the image of the millions of messages that “float” through the air as they travel between phones, computers, tablets, and e-readers. In this sense, the balloons serve as a reminder of the prevalence of digital messaging, while the messages written by Canadian soldiers refer to the Internet’s origins as a military-funded form of communication.
Look for 99 Red Beacons on September 21, 2013 during Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau!
- Victoria Nolte

99 Red Beacons by Britta Evans-Fenton

Today’s widespread use of the Internet and evolving forms of digital and social media has allowed us to be constantly plugged into our various communicative devices. This dependence on the web has essentially blurred the lines between the individual and the collective. As our devices allow us to become digital beacons, we shed our anonymity and remain in constant contact with the world around us.

Where would we be without the Internet?

With many of these issues in mind, Ottawa-based artist Britta Evans-Fenton (who we have featured on our blog before) has proposed an installation/performance piece that highlights the ubiquity of digital communication and sheds light on the unusual history of the Internet. The installation will be part of this year’s installment of Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau.

Britta’s inspiration for this project comes from the German Cold War protest song, “99 Luftballons” by Nena. As Britta discovered in her research, the technology that has developed into the World Wide Web was originally developed through Cold War military funding. The song references the military’s influence over lines of communication and comments on the paranoia and hysteria associated with war.

99 Red Beacons is a roaming installation featuring 99 blinking red balloons. Volunteers will carry the balloons around the city as they emit anonymous Morse code messages written by members of the Canadian Armed Forces. The physical presence of the balloons, gliding in the air, is likened to the image of the millions of messages that “float” through the air as they travel between phones, computers, tablets, and e-readers. In this sense, the balloons serve as a reminder of the prevalence of digital messaging, while the messages written by Canadian soldiers refer to the Internet’s origins as a military-funded form of communication.

Look for 99 Red Beacons on September 21, 2013 during Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau!

- Victoria Nolte

2 Photos
/ art technology installation britta evans-fenton nuit blanche ottawa victoria nolte

From Sound to Light, By Talking to Walls

Everyone has experienced an echo - a sound reverberating and bouncing off an object back to its original source. Echoes happen both in natural and urban settings, whether it’s someone shouting triumphantly into a canyon or the simple sound of traffic in a tunnel. Now, imagine what it would be like to be able to see what the sound waves of an echo look like. Murmur is a device that does exactly that, on a higher level: it collects sounds made physically by people and visualizes them virtually on a LED wall.

Created through the collaboration of four different French studios (Chevalvert, 2roqs, Polygraphik and Splank), the installation sets out to bridge the gap between physical and virtual worlds. Each studio contributed their own expertise in visual design, object design, sound design and programming to bring the project to life. What Murmur essentially does is simulate the transformation sound waves into light waves. By speaking into the “Echo Chamber” of the device, the ‘murmurs’ of the public and passers-by are collected and transmitted through a cord onto the LED wall. The animations focus on movement, reacting differently to different types of sound. The resulting effect is magical indeed, creating a new dialogue between the movement of the public and the architecture of the room.

You can read the full story and philosophy behind Murmur here.

-Lea Hamilton 

Sources: Creative Applications, Amusement, The Verge, Murmur

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

LightSoundVisualizationvideodigitalLEDChevalvert2roqsPolygraphikSplankMurmuranimationechoinstallationprogrammingLea Hamiltonart and science journaltechnology

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