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The Invisible Presence
The works of Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller often create a potent atmosphere through the abundant use of antiquated objects and nostalgic memorabilia. Kitty Scott of the AGO astutely thought to link the words memory palace to their works, which have been collected in a retrospective show held at the AGO and the Vancouver Art Gallery, where I was lucky enough to experience it. This description is most accurate because each piece is a complex network of memories that are at once accessible and completely foreign to the viewer. Works such as Dark Pool, 1995, Opera for a Small Room, 2005, and The Killing Machine, 2007, are composed of dense collections of used objects that have a strongly uncanny presence. The objects are often well worn and bear the musk of a former possessor. They are commonplace objects: vinyl records, tea cups, personal diaries and journals, all domestic items that most visitors have been intimately familiar with at one point in their life. And yet now the objects are being used and displayed so strangely in dark, heavy installations that any personal memories evoked in the viewer are undeniably contaminated by a foreign presence.
In Opera for a Small Room Cardiff & Miller use programmed lighting and robots to create the visual and aural traces of an unseeable person performing for the audience. The sound system plays a recording of the invisible man scuffling through the room, sorting through the stacks of records and speaking to the audience. His presence is further supported by lighting that creates his shadow flickering around the room and robotics that pull out his chair and turn on the record players. The invisible presence of modern technology is disguised as the invisible presence of the ghost who inhabits the installation. 
The Killing Machine has a menacing presence when visitors are first confronted with it. Two gangly and yet sinister robotic arms, as well as a variety of old television sets emitting buzzing static images surround an electronic dentist’s chair. The experience of the installation however only truly begins when the viewer inevitable pushes the large button that entices visitors to PRESS it. The Killing Machine is then brought to life and the viewer can only watch in horror as an invisible victim is tortured to death by the robotic arms equipped with firing pneumatic pistons that whirl in a dance of death around the chair. Click here to watch The Killing Machine in action.
Underlying the dated and decrepit objects of the Cardiff & Miller installations is a force used to create the eerie presence of their pieces. These artists ironically rely on the latest technology to bring new life and a new presence to their installations. Robotics and precise programming are essential to the execution of these pieces. Interestingly, in an interview with Canadian Art Cardiff explained that “Technology is not the subject matter for us,” and Miller was quick to follow, stating, “The concern is only in what it can do for us.”  Despite this aloof attitude towards technology, the duo is dependent upon the latest innovations to bring their ideas to fruition. Art and technology are inseparable from each other in the work of these two artists.
The Vancouver Art Gallery is set to host Lost in the Memory Palace from June 21st to September 21st, 2014.
- Emily Cluett
The Invisible Presence
The works of Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller often create a potent atmosphere through the abundant use of antiquated objects and nostalgic memorabilia. Kitty Scott of the AGO astutely thought to link the words memory palace to their works, which have been collected in a retrospective show held at the AGO and the Vancouver Art Gallery, where I was lucky enough to experience it. This description is most accurate because each piece is a complex network of memories that are at once accessible and completely foreign to the viewer. Works such as Dark Pool, 1995, Opera for a Small Room, 2005, and The Killing Machine, 2007, are composed of dense collections of used objects that have a strongly uncanny presence. The objects are often well worn and bear the musk of a former possessor. They are commonplace objects: vinyl records, tea cups, personal diaries and journals, all domestic items that most visitors have been intimately familiar with at one point in their life. And yet now the objects are being used and displayed so strangely in dark, heavy installations that any personal memories evoked in the viewer are undeniably contaminated by a foreign presence.
In Opera for a Small Room Cardiff & Miller use programmed lighting and robots to create the visual and aural traces of an unseeable person performing for the audience. The sound system plays a recording of the invisible man scuffling through the room, sorting through the stacks of records and speaking to the audience. His presence is further supported by lighting that creates his shadow flickering around the room and robotics that pull out his chair and turn on the record players. The invisible presence of modern technology is disguised as the invisible presence of the ghost who inhabits the installation. 
The Killing Machine has a menacing presence when visitors are first confronted with it. Two gangly and yet sinister robotic arms, as well as a variety of old television sets emitting buzzing static images surround an electronic dentist’s chair. The experience of the installation however only truly begins when the viewer inevitable pushes the large button that entices visitors to PRESS it. The Killing Machine is then brought to life and the viewer can only watch in horror as an invisible victim is tortured to death by the robotic arms equipped with firing pneumatic pistons that whirl in a dance of death around the chair. Click here to watch The Killing Machine in action.
Underlying the dated and decrepit objects of the Cardiff & Miller installations is a force used to create the eerie presence of their pieces. These artists ironically rely on the latest technology to bring new life and a new presence to their installations. Robotics and precise programming are essential to the execution of these pieces. Interestingly, in an interview with Canadian Art Cardiff explained that “Technology is not the subject matter for us,” and Miller was quick to follow, stating, “The concern is only in what it can do for us.”  Despite this aloof attitude towards technology, the duo is dependent upon the latest innovations to bring their ideas to fruition. Art and technology are inseparable from each other in the work of these two artists.
The Vancouver Art Gallery is set to host Lost in the Memory Palace from June 21st to September 21st, 2014.
- Emily Cluett
The Invisible Presence
The works of Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller often create a potent atmosphere through the abundant use of antiquated objects and nostalgic memorabilia. Kitty Scott of the AGO astutely thought to link the words memory palace to their works, which have been collected in a retrospective show held at the AGO and the Vancouver Art Gallery, where I was lucky enough to experience it. This description is most accurate because each piece is a complex network of memories that are at once accessible and completely foreign to the viewer. Works such as Dark Pool, 1995, Opera for a Small Room, 2005, and The Killing Machine, 2007, are composed of dense collections of used objects that have a strongly uncanny presence. The objects are often well worn and bear the musk of a former possessor. They are commonplace objects: vinyl records, tea cups, personal diaries and journals, all domestic items that most visitors have been intimately familiar with at one point in their life. And yet now the objects are being used and displayed so strangely in dark, heavy installations that any personal memories evoked in the viewer are undeniably contaminated by a foreign presence.
In Opera for a Small Room Cardiff & Miller use programmed lighting and robots to create the visual and aural traces of an unseeable person performing for the audience. The sound system plays a recording of the invisible man scuffling through the room, sorting through the stacks of records and speaking to the audience. His presence is further supported by lighting that creates his shadow flickering around the room and robotics that pull out his chair and turn on the record players. The invisible presence of modern technology is disguised as the invisible presence of the ghost who inhabits the installation. 
The Killing Machine has a menacing presence when visitors are first confronted with it. Two gangly and yet sinister robotic arms, as well as a variety of old television sets emitting buzzing static images surround an electronic dentist’s chair. The experience of the installation however only truly begins when the viewer inevitable pushes the large button that entices visitors to PRESS it. The Killing Machine is then brought to life and the viewer can only watch in horror as an invisible victim is tortured to death by the robotic arms equipped with firing pneumatic pistons that whirl in a dance of death around the chair. Click here to watch The Killing Machine in action.
Underlying the dated and decrepit objects of the Cardiff & Miller installations is a force used to create the eerie presence of their pieces. These artists ironically rely on the latest technology to bring new life and a new presence to their installations. Robotics and precise programming are essential to the execution of these pieces. Interestingly, in an interview with Canadian Art Cardiff explained that “Technology is not the subject matter for us,” and Miller was quick to follow, stating, “The concern is only in what it can do for us.”  Despite this aloof attitude towards technology, the duo is dependent upon the latest innovations to bring their ideas to fruition. Art and technology are inseparable from each other in the work of these two artists.
The Vancouver Art Gallery is set to host Lost in the Memory Palace from June 21st to September 21st, 2014.
- Emily Cluett

The Invisible Presence

The works of Canadian artists Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller often create a potent atmosphere through the abundant use of antiquated objects and nostalgic memorabilia. Kitty Scott of the AGO astutely thought to link the words memory palace to their works, which have been collected in a retrospective show held at the AGO and the Vancouver Art Gallery, where I was lucky enough to experience it. This description is most accurate because each piece is a complex network of memories that are at once accessible and completely foreign to the viewer. Works such as Dark Pool, 1995, Opera for a Small Room, 2005, and The Killing Machine, 2007, are composed of dense collections of used objects that have a strongly uncanny presence. The objects are often well worn and bear the musk of a former possessor. They are commonplace objects: vinyl records, tea cups, personal diaries and journals, all domestic items that most visitors have been intimately familiar with at one point in their life. And yet now the objects are being used and displayed so strangely in dark, heavy installations that any personal memories evoked in the viewer are undeniably contaminated by a foreign presence.

In Opera for a Small Room Cardiff & Miller use programmed lighting and robots to create the visual and aural traces of an unseeable person performing for the audience. The sound system plays a recording of the invisible man scuffling through the room, sorting through the stacks of records and speaking to the audience. His presence is further supported by lighting that creates his shadow flickering around the room and robotics that pull out his chair and turn on the record players. The invisible presence of modern technology is disguised as the invisible presence of the ghost who inhabits the installation.

The Killing Machine has a menacing presence when visitors are first confronted with it. Two gangly and yet sinister robotic arms, as well as a variety of old television sets emitting buzzing static images surround an electronic dentist’s chair. The experience of the installation however only truly begins when the viewer inevitable pushes the large button that entices visitors to PRESS it. The Killing Machine is then brought to life and the viewer can only watch in horror as an invisible victim is tortured to death by the robotic arms equipped with firing pneumatic pistons that whirl in a dance of death around the chair. Click here to watch The Killing Machine in action.

Underlying the dated and decrepit objects of the Cardiff & Miller installations is a force used to create the eerie presence of their pieces. These artists ironically rely on the latest technology to bring new life and a new presence to their installations. Robotics and precise programming are essential to the execution of these pieces. Interestingly, in an interview with Canadian Art Cardiff explained that “Technology is not the subject matter for us,” and Miller was quick to follow, stating, “The concern is only in what it can do for us.”  Despite this aloof attitude towards technology, the duo is dependent upon the latest innovations to bring their ideas to fruition. Art and technology are inseparable from each other in the work of these two artists.

The Vancouver Art Gallery is set to host Lost in the Memory Palace from June 21st to September 21st, 2014.

- Emily Cluett

3 Photos
/ janet cardiff george bures miller installation art robotics AGO vancouver art vancity
The Natural Canvas
British artist Andy Goldsworthy does not just make sculptures about nature, but makes them from natural elements that he finds. Materials commonly found in his work include leaves, rocks and even twigs, his installation space; everywhere. It can be argued that by creating these pieces, the artist turns the planet into his own canvas or installation space, as the works directly respond to their surroundings.
His natural manipulations draw upon the energy and life that is flowing through the landscape, paying homage to not only nature as an already existing piece of art, but that of a living one too. Each piece is site-specific to the landscape, transforming into the modernist ideal; conveying an experience of the real world while acknowledging the immediate physical reality of the materials. For Goldsworthy, it is not about showing the reality of man made materials like a canvas and paint brush, but the harmony of working with natural materials, that have always been readily available for our inspirations.
-Anna Paluch
The Natural Canvas
British artist Andy Goldsworthy does not just make sculptures about nature, but makes them from natural elements that he finds. Materials commonly found in his work include leaves, rocks and even twigs, his installation space; everywhere. It can be argued that by creating these pieces, the artist turns the planet into his own canvas or installation space, as the works directly respond to their surroundings.
His natural manipulations draw upon the energy and life that is flowing through the landscape, paying homage to not only nature as an already existing piece of art, but that of a living one too. Each piece is site-specific to the landscape, transforming into the modernist ideal; conveying an experience of the real world while acknowledging the immediate physical reality of the materials. For Goldsworthy, it is not about showing the reality of man made materials like a canvas and paint brush, but the harmony of working with natural materials, that have always been readily available for our inspirations.
-Anna Paluch
The Natural Canvas
British artist Andy Goldsworthy does not just make sculptures about nature, but makes them from natural elements that he finds. Materials commonly found in his work include leaves, rocks and even twigs, his installation space; everywhere. It can be argued that by creating these pieces, the artist turns the planet into his own canvas or installation space, as the works directly respond to their surroundings.
His natural manipulations draw upon the energy and life that is flowing through the landscape, paying homage to not only nature as an already existing piece of art, but that of a living one too. Each piece is site-specific to the landscape, transforming into the modernist ideal; conveying an experience of the real world while acknowledging the immediate physical reality of the materials. For Goldsworthy, it is not about showing the reality of man made materials like a canvas and paint brush, but the harmony of working with natural materials, that have always been readily available for our inspirations.
-Anna Paluch

The Natural Canvas

British artist Andy Goldsworthy does not just make sculptures about nature, but makes them from natural elements that he finds. Materials commonly found in his work include leaves, rocks and even twigs, his installation space; everywhere. It can be argued that by creating these pieces, the artist turns the planet into his own canvas or installation space, as the works directly respond to their surroundings.

His natural manipulations draw upon the energy and life that is flowing through the landscape, paying homage to not only nature as an already existing piece of art, but that of a living one too. Each piece is site-specific to the landscape, transforming into the modernist ideal; conveying an experience of the real world while acknowledging the immediate physical reality of the materials. For Goldsworthy, it is not about showing the reality of man made materials like a canvas and paint brush, but the harmony of working with natural materials, that have always been readily available for our inspirations.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ andy goldsworthy landscape art art science art and science journal installation art nature anna paluch
Trevor Paglen’s Nonfunctional Satellite 
Opening September 12th in Istanbul, Turkey, Protocinema features an installation by artist/astronomer/author Trevor Paglen (previously featured on A&SJ HERE). Perhaps best known for his photographic investigation of the covert operations conducted by government agencies such as the CIA and their covert satellites and offensive military drone program; this new work sees Paglen taking aerospace technologies typically associated with militarism and challenges their ability to exist in a manner at odds with their conventional function, with an emphasis on aesthetics and design.
Prototype for a Nonfunctional Satellite (Design 4; Build 3) 2013, is a sculpture designed to be placed into low-earth orbit and reflect sunlight down to the earth’s surface. Once launched, it would appear as a bright point of light slowly moving across the sky over the course of several months, before burning up in the atmosphere. This spacecraft-cum-art object combines maximum reflectivity with minimum weight, taking the shape of a giant mirror-like sphere.
Paglen ponders what the aerospace engineering industry would look like if its methods were decoupled from the corporate and military interests that currently fund all space endeavors. His nonfunctional satellite recasts the age old question of “art for art’s sake” within a different field and with a different spin, asking whether we can imagine a place for “aerospace engineering for aerospace engineering’s sake.” In doing so, the spacecraft functions as both a critique of the militarization and commercialization of the night sky, and a way to imagine how things could be different.
Founded in 2011, Protocinema is a nonprofit art organization that makes transnational, nomadic exhibitions in Istanbul and New York. Protocinema creates opportunities for emerging and established artists from all regions to realize new work and exhibit existing work in a variety of contexts that are open to the public, and accessible to a wide range of individuals.
- Rob Echlin

Trevor Paglen’s Nonfunctional Satellite

Opening September 12th in Istanbul, Turkey, Protocinema features an installation by artist/astronomer/author Trevor Paglen (previously featured on A&SJ HERE). Perhaps best known for his photographic investigation of the covert operations conducted by government agencies such as the CIA and their covert satellites and offensive military drone program; this new work sees Paglen taking aerospace technologies typically associated with militarism and challenges their ability to exist in a manner at odds with their conventional function, with an emphasis on aesthetics and design.

Prototype for a Nonfunctional Satellite (Design 4; Build 3) 2013, is a sculpture designed to be placed into low-earth orbit and reflect sunlight down to the earth’s surface. Once launched, it would appear as a bright point of light slowly moving across the sky over the course of several months, before burning up in the atmosphere. This spacecraft-cum-art object combines maximum reflectivity with minimum weight, taking the shape of a giant mirror-like sphere.

Paglen ponders what the aerospace engineering industry would look like if its methods were decoupled from the corporate and military interests that currently fund all space endeavors. His nonfunctional satellite recasts the age old question of “art for art’s sake” within a different field and with a different spin, asking whether we can imagine a place for “aerospace engineering for aerospace engineering’s sake.” In doing so, the spacecraft functions as both a critique of the militarization and commercialization of the night sky, and a way to imagine how things could be different.

Founded in 2011, Protocinema is a nonprofit art organization that makes transnational, nomadic exhibitions in Istanbul and New York. Protocinema creates opportunities for emerging and established artists from all regions to realize new work and exhibit existing work in a variety of contexts that are open to the public, and accessible to a wide range of individuals.

- Rob Echlin

Trevor Paglen installation art art and science journal Sciene Space Aerospace
Jeongmoon Choi’s Drawing in Space
Working with fine thread as her medium, Berlin-based artist Jeongmoon Choi creates these arresting installations. Displayed under blacklights, Choi’s meticulously-arranged thread patterns produce illusions of light and space — a total, enveloping visual experience for gallery visitors. Galerie Laurent Mueller, where Choi’s work is now on display, has this to say about Drawing in Space:
"The thread is coloured and used to outline or redefine the architecture of the spaces the artist invests. Drawing directly into space with her hand, the artist addresses questions about our environment, as well as about aspects of lodging and the role of nature in our urban spaces. The drawings become project or even projection of an imaginary construction that takes form in its environment starting from a line, a thread, which represents the chronological decisions of a progression in space. The transition from a plane to a volume is just as important as the comparison between interior space for living and exterior space for living.”
See more of Choi’s work at her website here.

- Erin Saunders
Jeongmoon Choi’s Drawing in Space
Working with fine thread as her medium, Berlin-based artist Jeongmoon Choi creates these arresting installations. Displayed under blacklights, Choi’s meticulously-arranged thread patterns produce illusions of light and space — a total, enveloping visual experience for gallery visitors. Galerie Laurent Mueller, where Choi’s work is now on display, has this to say about Drawing in Space:
"The thread is coloured and used to outline or redefine the architecture of the spaces the artist invests. Drawing directly into space with her hand, the artist addresses questions about our environment, as well as about aspects of lodging and the role of nature in our urban spaces. The drawings become project or even projection of an imaginary construction that takes form in its environment starting from a line, a thread, which represents the chronological decisions of a progression in space. The transition from a plane to a volume is just as important as the comparison between interior space for living and exterior space for living.”
See more of Choi’s work at her website here.

- Erin Saunders
Jeongmoon Choi’s Drawing in Space
Working with fine thread as her medium, Berlin-based artist Jeongmoon Choi creates these arresting installations. Displayed under blacklights, Choi’s meticulously-arranged thread patterns produce illusions of light and space — a total, enveloping visual experience for gallery visitors. Galerie Laurent Mueller, where Choi’s work is now on display, has this to say about Drawing in Space:
"The thread is coloured and used to outline or redefine the architecture of the spaces the artist invests. Drawing directly into space with her hand, the artist addresses questions about our environment, as well as about aspects of lodging and the role of nature in our urban spaces. The drawings become project or even projection of an imaginary construction that takes form in its environment starting from a line, a thread, which represents the chronological decisions of a progression in space. The transition from a plane to a volume is just as important as the comparison between interior space for living and exterior space for living.”
See more of Choi’s work at her website here.

- Erin Saunders
Jeongmoon Choi’s Drawing in Space
Working with fine thread as her medium, Berlin-based artist Jeongmoon Choi creates these arresting installations. Displayed under blacklights, Choi’s meticulously-arranged thread patterns produce illusions of light and space — a total, enveloping visual experience for gallery visitors. Galerie Laurent Mueller, where Choi’s work is now on display, has this to say about Drawing in Space:
"The thread is coloured and used to outline or redefine the architecture of the spaces the artist invests. Drawing directly into space with her hand, the artist addresses questions about our environment, as well as about aspects of lodging and the role of nature in our urban spaces. The drawings become project or even projection of an imaginary construction that takes form in its environment starting from a line, a thread, which represents the chronological decisions of a progression in space. The transition from a plane to a volume is just as important as the comparison between interior space for living and exterior space for living.”
See more of Choi’s work at her website here.

- Erin Saunders

Jeongmoon Choi’s Drawing in Space


Working with fine thread as her medium, Berlin-based artist Jeongmoon Choi creates these arresting installations. Displayed under blacklights, Choi’s meticulously-arranged thread patterns produce illusions of light and space — a total, enveloping visual experience for gallery visitors.
Galerie Laurent Mueller, where Choi’s work is now on display, has this to say about Drawing in Space:

"The thread is coloured and used to outline or redefine the architecture of the spaces the artist invests. Drawing directly into space with her hand, the artist addresses questions about our environment, as well as about aspects of lodging and the role of nature in our urban spaces.

The drawings become project or even projection of an imaginary construction that takes form in its environment starting from a line, a thread, which represents the chronological decisions of a progression in space. The transition from a plane to a volume is just as important as the comparison between interior space for living and exterior space for living.”

See more of Choi’s work at her website here.

- Erin Saunders

4 Photos
/ art science installation art jeongmoon choi thread yarn black light
Lisha Bai
This architectural installation at the National Academy in New York City by artist Lisha Bai is titled Undulate. These illusory floor tiles add dimension and movement to an otherwise overlooked space; a traditional setting is instantly made creative and contemporary. By playing with perception, Bai is able to reimagine the floor beneath our feet as a place of artistic potential and exploration.
For more of Bai’s work, check out her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Lisha Bai
This architectural installation at the National Academy in New York City by artist Lisha Bai is titled Undulate. These illusory floor tiles add dimension and movement to an otherwise overlooked space; a traditional setting is instantly made creative and contemporary. By playing with perception, Bai is able to reimagine the floor beneath our feet as a place of artistic potential and exploration.
For more of Bai’s work, check out her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Lisha Bai
This architectural installation at the National Academy in New York City by artist Lisha Bai is titled Undulate. These illusory floor tiles add dimension and movement to an otherwise overlooked space; a traditional setting is instantly made creative and contemporary. By playing with perception, Bai is able to reimagine the floor beneath our feet as a place of artistic potential and exploration.
For more of Bai’s work, check out her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Lisha Bai
This architectural installation at the National Academy in New York City by artist Lisha Bai is titled Undulate. These illusory floor tiles add dimension and movement to an otherwise overlooked space; a traditional setting is instantly made creative and contemporary. By playing with perception, Bai is able to reimagine the floor beneath our feet as a place of artistic potential and exploration.
For more of Bai’s work, check out her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Kristin Lucas
Kristin Lucas’s Video Checkout is an interpretation of the process by which some technologies become obsolete. Visitors to the installation are invited to “check out” VHS tapes cast in concrete, recalling the recent – but swiftly outdated – ritual of renting movies. Once a contemporary experience, the act of borrowing a video is now one of history as Lucas adds an almost archeological element through her use of material. Video Checkout forces us to ask whether the VHS tape is truly as useful as a concrete block, or whether our nostalgia for its cultural contribution still grants the medium some value; is the phase-out of the movie rental store just another point for the digital self, or a point lost for human interaction? 
See many more of Lucas’s projects at her website here, and a review of the installation here.
- Erin Saunders
Kristin Lucas
Kristin Lucas’s Video Checkout is an interpretation of the process by which some technologies become obsolete. Visitors to the installation are invited to “check out” VHS tapes cast in concrete, recalling the recent – but swiftly outdated – ritual of renting movies. Once a contemporary experience, the act of borrowing a video is now one of history as Lucas adds an almost archeological element through her use of material. Video Checkout forces us to ask whether the VHS tape is truly as useful as a concrete block, or whether our nostalgia for its cultural contribution still grants the medium some value; is the phase-out of the movie rental store just another point for the digital self, or a point lost for human interaction? 
See many more of Lucas’s projects at her website here, and a review of the installation here.
- Erin Saunders
Kristin Lucas
Kristin Lucas’s Video Checkout is an interpretation of the process by which some technologies become obsolete. Visitors to the installation are invited to “check out” VHS tapes cast in concrete, recalling the recent – but swiftly outdated – ritual of renting movies. Once a contemporary experience, the act of borrowing a video is now one of history as Lucas adds an almost archeological element through her use of material. Video Checkout forces us to ask whether the VHS tape is truly as useful as a concrete block, or whether our nostalgia for its cultural contribution still grants the medium some value; is the phase-out of the movie rental store just another point for the digital self, or a point lost for human interaction? 
See many more of Lucas’s projects at her website here, and a review of the installation here.
- Erin Saunders
Kristin Lucas
Kristin Lucas’s Video Checkout is an interpretation of the process by which some technologies become obsolete. Visitors to the installation are invited to “check out” VHS tapes cast in concrete, recalling the recent – but swiftly outdated – ritual of renting movies. Once a contemporary experience, the act of borrowing a video is now one of history as Lucas adds an almost archeological element through her use of material. Video Checkout forces us to ask whether the VHS tape is truly as useful as a concrete block, or whether our nostalgia for its cultural contribution still grants the medium some value; is the phase-out of the movie rental store just another point for the digital self, or a point lost for human interaction? 
See many more of Lucas’s projects at her website here, and a review of the installation here.
- Erin Saunders
Kristin Lucas
Kristin Lucas’s Video Checkout is an interpretation of the process by which some technologies become obsolete. Visitors to the installation are invited to “check out” VHS tapes cast in concrete, recalling the recent – but swiftly outdated – ritual of renting movies. Once a contemporary experience, the act of borrowing a video is now one of history as Lucas adds an almost archeological element through her use of material. Video Checkout forces us to ask whether the VHS tape is truly as useful as a concrete block, or whether our nostalgia for its cultural contribution still grants the medium some value; is the phase-out of the movie rental store just another point for the digital self, or a point lost for human interaction? 
See many more of Lucas’s projects at her website here, and a review of the installation here.
- Erin Saunders
Kristin Lucas
Kristin Lucas’s Video Checkout is an interpretation of the process by which some technologies become obsolete. Visitors to the installation are invited to “check out” VHS tapes cast in concrete, recalling the recent – but swiftly outdated – ritual of renting movies. Once a contemporary experience, the act of borrowing a video is now one of history as Lucas adds an almost archeological element through her use of material. Video Checkout forces us to ask whether the VHS tape is truly as useful as a concrete block, or whether our nostalgia for its cultural contribution still grants the medium some value; is the phase-out of the movie rental store just another point for the digital self, or a point lost for human interaction? 
See many more of Lucas’s projects at her website here, and a review of the installation here.
- Erin Saunders
A Common Name
A Common Name’s new Geode street art project fills LA’s urban gaps with natural wonder by recalling the interior of cracked open mineral geodes. These miniature installations made of paper sculpture – like the natural phenomena they refer to – are also subject to both the forces of nature, and those passersby who wish to take home a souvenir. A Common Name writes:
 ” A parallel aspect of these “geodes” in nature and in the city is they are always unexpected treasures. You might go hunting for treasures but you generally happen upon them during your adventures or casual interaction with the environment. I enjoy the fact that many people will not notice these, but some astute people will; that these will not last forever and the weather will affect them as naturally as it might in nature. So far I’ve made twelve—several have been trashed or taken away, and one has fallen apart due to rain.”
 Visit A Common Name’s blog and website for more. And check out this enormous, completely beautiful, completely gratuitous geode.
- Erin Saunders
A Common Name
A Common Name’s new Geode street art project fills LA’s urban gaps with natural wonder by recalling the interior of cracked open mineral geodes. These miniature installations made of paper sculpture – like the natural phenomena they refer to – are also subject to both the forces of nature, and those passersby who wish to take home a souvenir. A Common Name writes:
 ” A parallel aspect of these “geodes” in nature and in the city is they are always unexpected treasures. You might go hunting for treasures but you generally happen upon them during your adventures or casual interaction with the environment. I enjoy the fact that many people will not notice these, but some astute people will; that these will not last forever and the weather will affect them as naturally as it might in nature. So far I’ve made twelve—several have been trashed or taken away, and one has fallen apart due to rain.”
 Visit A Common Name’s blog and website for more. And check out this enormous, completely beautiful, completely gratuitous geode.
- Erin Saunders
A Common Name
A Common Name’s new Geode street art project fills LA’s urban gaps with natural wonder by recalling the interior of cracked open mineral geodes. These miniature installations made of paper sculpture – like the natural phenomena they refer to – are also subject to both the forces of nature, and those passersby who wish to take home a souvenir. A Common Name writes:
 ” A parallel aspect of these “geodes” in nature and in the city is they are always unexpected treasures. You might go hunting for treasures but you generally happen upon them during your adventures or casual interaction with the environment. I enjoy the fact that many people will not notice these, but some astute people will; that these will not last forever and the weather will affect them as naturally as it might in nature. So far I’ve made twelve—several have been trashed or taken away, and one has fallen apart due to rain.”
 Visit A Common Name’s blog and website for more. And check out this enormous, completely beautiful, completely gratuitous geode.
- Erin Saunders
A Common Name
A Common Name’s new Geode street art project fills LA’s urban gaps with natural wonder by recalling the interior of cracked open mineral geodes. These miniature installations made of paper sculpture – like the natural phenomena they refer to – are also subject to both the forces of nature, and those passersby who wish to take home a souvenir. A Common Name writes:
 ” A parallel aspect of these “geodes” in nature and in the city is they are always unexpected treasures. You might go hunting for treasures but you generally happen upon them during your adventures or casual interaction with the environment. I enjoy the fact that many people will not notice these, but some astute people will; that these will not last forever and the weather will affect them as naturally as it might in nature. So far I’ve made twelve—several have been trashed or taken away, and one has fallen apart due to rain.”
 Visit A Common Name’s blog and website for more. And check out this enormous, completely beautiful, completely gratuitous geode.
- Erin Saunders
A Common Name
A Common Name’s new Geode street art project fills LA’s urban gaps with natural wonder by recalling the interior of cracked open mineral geodes. These miniature installations made of paper sculpture – like the natural phenomena they refer to – are also subject to both the forces of nature, and those passersby who wish to take home a souvenir. A Common Name writes:
 ” A parallel aspect of these “geodes” in nature and in the city is they are always unexpected treasures. You might go hunting for treasures but you generally happen upon them during your adventures or casual interaction with the environment. I enjoy the fact that many people will not notice these, but some astute people will; that these will not last forever and the weather will affect them as naturally as it might in nature. So far I’ve made twelve—several have been trashed or taken away, and one has fallen apart due to rain.”
 Visit A Common Name’s blog and website for more. And check out this enormous, completely beautiful, completely gratuitous geode.
- Erin Saunders
A Common Name
A Common Name’s new Geode street art project fills LA’s urban gaps with natural wonder by recalling the interior of cracked open mineral geodes. These miniature installations made of paper sculpture – like the natural phenomena they refer to – are also subject to both the forces of nature, and those passersby who wish to take home a souvenir. A Common Name writes:
 ” A parallel aspect of these “geodes” in nature and in the city is they are always unexpected treasures. You might go hunting for treasures but you generally happen upon them during your adventures or casual interaction with the environment. I enjoy the fact that many people will not notice these, but some astute people will; that these will not last forever and the weather will affect them as naturally as it might in nature. So far I’ve made twelve—several have been trashed or taken away, and one has fallen apart due to rain.”
 Visit A Common Name’s blog and website for more. And check out this enormous, completely beautiful, completely gratuitous geode.
- Erin Saunders

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