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Urban Aquarium by Sayuri Sasaki Hemann

Aquariums are windows into a world we rarely, if ever get to experience in our lives; unless of course, you are a deep sea diver. An aquarium though, is just a box, with only a sample of water-dwelling creatures that are found in the wild. The creatures are not in their natural environment; they are displaced, exhibited solely for our viewing pleasure. What artist Sayuri Sasaki Hemann is trying to show in her ongoing project Urban Aquarium is this displacement of elements, or being ‘out of context’. According to the artist, the jellyfish in the wild are displaced when put in aquariums and likewise, the jellyfish in the aquarium are displaced when put in front of the public

The work seems to challenges the viewer with the idea of interacting with other living things, outside of their natural environments. Passers by in, for example the Portland International Airport, are forced to come face to face with these representations of jellyfish, in an environment they least expected. Aquarium or zoo; yes, but the airport?

Not only does this work talk about displacement on a theoretical level, but aesthetically as well. Viewers are able to explore how light reflects off different mediums, becoming displaced throughout the piece. The artist combines various senses and thought-processes into one incredible work.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

sayuri sasaki hemannanna paluchurban aquariummixed mediadisplacementjellyfishartscienceart and science journalnatural environmentlight reflection
From Rosemarie Trockel’s ‘A Cosmos’: Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka’s Glass Jellyfish
Rosemarie Trockel invites us into an almost paradoxical cosmos, for the universe this German artist has created does not appear at first sight to be ordered but instead a historical, mirrored storage space in which the reflections of artistic influence (artist on artist, politics on art, nature on art e.t.c.) can be seen. The graceful jellyfish models by Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka form a small yet striking part of this collection expounding on Trockel’s desire to ‘create a space for ideas to exist between different disciplines’.

The Blaschka’s blown-glass jellyfish models are some of the many biological specimens they made for the Natural History Museum of Boston in the late 19th century. The craftsmanship and expertise with which these models were made perfectly compliment the etherealness and fragility of a jellyfish; the apparent complexity of their wispy translucent tentacles appear to contradict their now known evolutionary ‘simplicity’. Trockel displays these specimens in a dark glass case, akin to the deep seas in which the living forms of them reside, thus, these stationary models appear to bob and glide as their prototypes would.

Trockel’s attempt to combine all her artistic inspiration in one space, unperturbed by contemporary expectations for a perfectly ‘coherent’ exhibition is a success. Science plays a huge role in this collection, with a photo of a skinhead with botanical tattoos, the aforementioned German jellyfish models and elaborate floral drawings by Trockel herself. In the room in which all these pieces are placed, Trockel manages to convince the viewer that artistic inspiration needn’t always come from complex human abstractions or social constructions but can instead ensue from the undirected vastness of the natural world.

‘A Cosmos’ is currently on at The Serpentine in London: http://www.serpentinegallery.org/2011/03/rosemarie_trockel_a_cosmos.html

Adrian Deen
From Rosemarie Trockel’s ‘A Cosmos’: Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka’s Glass Jellyfish
Rosemarie Trockel invites us into an almost paradoxical cosmos, for the universe this German artist has created does not appear at first sight to be ordered but instead a historical, mirrored storage space in which the reflections of artistic influence (artist on artist, politics on art, nature on art e.t.c.) can be seen. The graceful jellyfish models by Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka form a small yet striking part of this collection expounding on Trockel’s desire to ‘create a space for ideas to exist between different disciplines’.

The Blaschka’s blown-glass jellyfish models are some of the many biological specimens they made for the Natural History Museum of Boston in the late 19th century. The craftsmanship and expertise with which these models were made perfectly compliment the etherealness and fragility of a jellyfish; the apparent complexity of their wispy translucent tentacles appear to contradict their now known evolutionary ‘simplicity’. Trockel displays these specimens in a dark glass case, akin to the deep seas in which the living forms of them reside, thus, these stationary models appear to bob and glide as their prototypes would.

Trockel’s attempt to combine all her artistic inspiration in one space, unperturbed by contemporary expectations for a perfectly ‘coherent’ exhibition is a success. Science plays a huge role in this collection, with a photo of a skinhead with botanical tattoos, the aforementioned German jellyfish models and elaborate floral drawings by Trockel herself. In the room in which all these pieces are placed, Trockel manages to convince the viewer that artistic inspiration needn’t always come from complex human abstractions or social constructions but can instead ensue from the undirected vastness of the natural world.

‘A Cosmos’ is currently on at The Serpentine in London: http://www.serpentinegallery.org/2011/03/rosemarie_trockel_a_cosmos.html

Adrian Deen

From Rosemarie Trockel’s ‘A Cosmos’: Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka’s Glass Jellyfish

Rosemarie Trockel invites us into an almost paradoxical cosmos, for the universe this German artist has created does not appear at first sight to be ordered but instead a historical, mirrored storage space in which the reflections of artistic influence (artist on artist, politics on art, nature on art e.t.c.) can be seen. The graceful jellyfish models by Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka form a small yet striking part of this collection expounding on Trockel’s desire to ‘create a space for ideas to exist between different disciplines’.

The Blaschka’s blown-glass jellyfish models are some of the many biological specimens they made for the Natural History Museum of Boston in the late 19th century. The craftsmanship and expertise with which these models were made perfectly compliment the etherealness and fragility of a jellyfish; the apparent complexity of their wispy translucent tentacles appear to contradict their now known evolutionary ‘simplicity’. Trockel displays these specimens in a dark glass case, akin to the deep seas in which the living forms of them reside, thus, these stationary models appear to bob and glide as their prototypes would.

Trockel’s attempt to combine all her artistic inspiration in one space, unperturbed by contemporary expectations for a perfectly ‘coherent’ exhibition is a success. Science plays a huge role in this collection, with a photo of a skinhead with botanical tattoos, the aforementioned German jellyfish models and elaborate floral drawings by Trockel herself. In the room in which all these pieces are placed, Trockel manages to convince the viewer that artistic inspiration needn’t always come from complex human abstractions or social constructions but can instead ensue from the undirected vastness of the natural world.

‘A Cosmos’ is currently on at The Serpentine in London: http://www.serpentinegallery.org/2011/03/rosemarie_trockel_a_cosmos.html

Adrian Deen

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ art science rosemarie trockel the serpentine adrian deen jellyfish blaschka

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