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Another Look at Canadian Landscape
The most recent project of Berlin based artist Charles Stankievech presents us with a 35 mm film installation which reimagines Northern Canadian landscape and its relationship to military infrastructure and the architecture of remote outposts. The time-lapse footage is accompanied by a highly effective soundtrack scored by the artist himself. The footage for the project, The Soniferous Æther of The Land Beyond The Land Beyond, was shot by Stankievech while at the CFS ALERT Signals Intelligence Station - the northern-most settlement on earth that remains populated year round. The Station was built on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut in the 1950’s, and has a complex military history with the station having been used throughout the cold war as surveillance for Russian communications. Today it is a Canadian operation with about 200 inhabitants at any given time. The name of the project plays with a phrase describing the region in the Inuit language Inukitut, which translates to “The Land Beyond the Land of the People”. Filmed during the winter months, the station is shrouded in darkness, with inhabitants taking refuge from temperatures reaching -50 degrees celsius.
The result is an unsettling vision of the far North - the footage definitely relies on certain aesthetics that are linked to science fiction, and even our expectations of solitary outposts at the end of the world. Stankievech explains in conversation with WIRED that this outpost is a place where “the celestial meets the terrestial” with a landscape that easily relates to outer space. The haunting images in the film render this far-off destination as an extra-terrestrial or even post-human environment.
Here’s the artist’s website for more details. The above images are screen shots from the film - if you weren’t lucky enough to catch the project in person at Toronto’s Nuit Blanche (like me) - you can take a look at the trailer here.
-Katherine Lawson
Another Look at Canadian Landscape
The most recent project of Berlin based artist Charles Stankievech presents us with a 35 mm film installation which reimagines Northern Canadian landscape and its relationship to military infrastructure and the architecture of remote outposts. The time-lapse footage is accompanied by a highly effective soundtrack scored by the artist himself. The footage for the project, The Soniferous Æther of The Land Beyond The Land Beyond, was shot by Stankievech while at the CFS ALERT Signals Intelligence Station - the northern-most settlement on earth that remains populated year round. The Station was built on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut in the 1950’s, and has a complex military history with the station having been used throughout the cold war as surveillance for Russian communications. Today it is a Canadian operation with about 200 inhabitants at any given time. The name of the project plays with a phrase describing the region in the Inuit language Inukitut, which translates to “The Land Beyond the Land of the People”. Filmed during the winter months, the station is shrouded in darkness, with inhabitants taking refuge from temperatures reaching -50 degrees celsius.
The result is an unsettling vision of the far North - the footage definitely relies on certain aesthetics that are linked to science fiction, and even our expectations of solitary outposts at the end of the world. Stankievech explains in conversation with WIRED that this outpost is a place where “the celestial meets the terrestial” with a landscape that easily relates to outer space. The haunting images in the film render this far-off destination as an extra-terrestrial or even post-human environment.
Here’s the artist’s website for more details. The above images are screen shots from the film - if you weren’t lucky enough to catch the project in person at Toronto’s Nuit Blanche (like me) - you can take a look at the trailer here.
-Katherine Lawson

Another Look at Canadian Landscape

The most recent project of Berlin based artist Charles Stankievech presents us with a 35 mm film installation which reimagines Northern Canadian landscape and its relationship to military infrastructure and the architecture of remote outposts. The time-lapse footage is accompanied by a highly effective soundtrack scored by the artist himself. The footage for the project, The Soniferous Æther of The Land Beyond The Land Beyond, was shot by Stankievech while at the CFS ALERT Signals Intelligence Station - the northern-most settlement on earth that remains populated year round. The Station was built on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut in the 1950’s, and has a complex military history with the station having been used throughout the cold war as surveillance for Russian communications. Today it is a Canadian operation with about 200 inhabitants at any given time. The name of the project plays with a phrase describing the region in the Inuit language Inukitut, which translates to “The Land Beyond the Land of the People”. Filmed during the winter months, the station is shrouded in darkness, with inhabitants taking refuge from temperatures reaching -50 degrees celsius.

The result is an unsettling vision of the far North - the footage definitely relies on certain aesthetics that are linked to science fiction, and even our expectations of solitary outposts at the end of the world. Stankievech explains in conversation with WIRED that this outpost is a place where “the celestial meets the terrestial” with a landscape that easily relates to outer space. The haunting images in the film render this far-off destination as an extra-terrestrial or even post-human environment.

Here’s the artist’s website for more details. The above images are screen shots from the film - if you weren’t lucky enough to catch the project in person at Toronto’s Nuit Blanche (like me) - you can take a look at the trailer here.

-Katherine Lawson

2 Photos
/ charles stankievech art landscape sci fi military canadian film katherine lawson space
Nature’s Vibrations: Lin Xue
Time sensitivity is not what comes to mind when one views the ink drawings of Lin Xue. The viewer is too busy noting the intricacies of the lines and forms; immersing themselves in the segments of buildings and landscapes that meld into a chimerical natural world. But these drawings had to be done quickly and without being able to control the final composition of the piece. Xue’s drawing tool of choice is a sharpened shard of bamboo, and bamboo doesn’t retain ink so each mark must be made quickly and with precision. The choice of tool reflects both the artist’s closeness to nature (the drawings themselves are inspired by his regular mountain hikes), as well as explaining the intent to express nature itself. Xue has always been drawn to the “orchestral energy” he sensed within the world around him, the vibrations of what was living, and these drawings represent his attempts to place it on paper.
These drawings, despite being obviously inspired by Xue’s immersion within nature, have an element of the fantastic; they are isolated world clusters, floating islands that are a configuration between nature’s energies and the workings of the mind. The patterns of landscape and edifice are the artist’s way of rendering the network within nature that links everything together. The stitched together quality also fools the viewer as to whether or not what they are looking at is macro or micro. The size of the work itself forces the viewer to be intimate, looking closely to see all of the details, but the landscape cannot help but invoke the feeling that one is approaching a new world in its own right.
The drawings shown above were selected to be exhibited in the Arsenale, part of the Venice Biennale 2013. To learn more about the Biennale,and the theme of the Biennale itself, click here.
- Lea Hamilton
Nature’s Vibrations: Lin Xue
Time sensitivity is not what comes to mind when one views the ink drawings of Lin Xue. The viewer is too busy noting the intricacies of the lines and forms; immersing themselves in the segments of buildings and landscapes that meld into a chimerical natural world. But these drawings had to be done quickly and without being able to control the final composition of the piece. Xue’s drawing tool of choice is a sharpened shard of bamboo, and bamboo doesn’t retain ink so each mark must be made quickly and with precision. The choice of tool reflects both the artist’s closeness to nature (the drawings themselves are inspired by his regular mountain hikes), as well as explaining the intent to express nature itself. Xue has always been drawn to the “orchestral energy” he sensed within the world around him, the vibrations of what was living, and these drawings represent his attempts to place it on paper.
These drawings, despite being obviously inspired by Xue’s immersion within nature, have an element of the fantastic; they are isolated world clusters, floating islands that are a configuration between nature’s energies and the workings of the mind. The patterns of landscape and edifice are the artist’s way of rendering the network within nature that links everything together. The stitched together quality also fools the viewer as to whether or not what they are looking at is macro or micro. The size of the work itself forces the viewer to be intimate, looking closely to see all of the details, but the landscape cannot help but invoke the feeling that one is approaching a new world in its own right.
The drawings shown above were selected to be exhibited in the Arsenale, part of the Venice Biennale 2013. To learn more about the Biennale,and the theme of the Biennale itself, click here.
- Lea Hamilton
Nature’s Vibrations: Lin Xue
Time sensitivity is not what comes to mind when one views the ink drawings of Lin Xue. The viewer is too busy noting the intricacies of the lines and forms; immersing themselves in the segments of buildings and landscapes that meld into a chimerical natural world. But these drawings had to be done quickly and without being able to control the final composition of the piece. Xue’s drawing tool of choice is a sharpened shard of bamboo, and bamboo doesn’t retain ink so each mark must be made quickly and with precision. The choice of tool reflects both the artist’s closeness to nature (the drawings themselves are inspired by his regular mountain hikes), as well as explaining the intent to express nature itself. Xue has always been drawn to the “orchestral energy” he sensed within the world around him, the vibrations of what was living, and these drawings represent his attempts to place it on paper.
These drawings, despite being obviously inspired by Xue’s immersion within nature, have an element of the fantastic; they are isolated world clusters, floating islands that are a configuration between nature’s energies and the workings of the mind. The patterns of landscape and edifice are the artist’s way of rendering the network within nature that links everything together. The stitched together quality also fools the viewer as to whether or not what they are looking at is macro or micro. The size of the work itself forces the viewer to be intimate, looking closely to see all of the details, but the landscape cannot help but invoke the feeling that one is approaching a new world in its own right.
The drawings shown above were selected to be exhibited in the Arsenale, part of the Venice Biennale 2013. To learn more about the Biennale,and the theme of the Biennale itself, click here.
- Lea Hamilton
Nature’s Vibrations: Lin Xue
Time sensitivity is not what comes to mind when one views the ink drawings of Lin Xue. The viewer is too busy noting the intricacies of the lines and forms; immersing themselves in the segments of buildings and landscapes that meld into a chimerical natural world. But these drawings had to be done quickly and without being able to control the final composition of the piece. Xue’s drawing tool of choice is a sharpened shard of bamboo, and bamboo doesn’t retain ink so each mark must be made quickly and with precision. The choice of tool reflects both the artist’s closeness to nature (the drawings themselves are inspired by his regular mountain hikes), as well as explaining the intent to express nature itself. Xue has always been drawn to the “orchestral energy” he sensed within the world around him, the vibrations of what was living, and these drawings represent his attempts to place it on paper.
These drawings, despite being obviously inspired by Xue’s immersion within nature, have an element of the fantastic; they are isolated world clusters, floating islands that are a configuration between nature’s energies and the workings of the mind. The patterns of landscape and edifice are the artist’s way of rendering the network within nature that links everything together. The stitched together quality also fools the viewer as to whether or not what they are looking at is macro or micro. The size of the work itself forces the viewer to be intimate, looking closely to see all of the details, but the landscape cannot help but invoke the feeling that one is approaching a new world in its own right.
The drawings shown above were selected to be exhibited in the Arsenale, part of the Venice Biennale 2013. To learn more about the Biennale,and the theme of the Biennale itself, click here.
- Lea Hamilton

Nature’s Vibrations: Lin Xue

Time sensitivity is not what comes to mind when one views the ink drawings of Lin Xue. The viewer is too busy noting the intricacies of the lines and forms; immersing themselves in the segments of buildings and landscapes that meld into a chimerical natural world. But these drawings had to be done quickly and without being able to control the final composition of the piece. Xue’s drawing tool of choice is a sharpened shard of bamboo, and bamboo doesn’t retain ink so each mark must be made quickly and with precision. The choice of tool reflects both the artist’s closeness to nature (the drawings themselves are inspired by his regular mountain hikes), as well as explaining the intent to express nature itself. Xue has always been drawn to the “orchestral energy” he sensed within the world around him, the vibrations of what was living, and these drawings represent his attempts to place it on paper.

These drawings, despite being obviously inspired by Xue’s immersion within nature, have an element of the fantastic; they are isolated world clusters, floating islands that are a configuration between nature’s energies and the workings of the mind. The patterns of landscape and edifice are the artist’s way of rendering the network within nature that links everything together. The stitched together quality also fools the viewer as to whether or not what they are looking at is macro or micro. The size of the work itself forces the viewer to be intimate, looking closely to see all of the details, but the landscape cannot help but invoke the feeling that one is approaching a new world in its own right.

The drawings shown above were selected to be exhibited in the Arsenale, part of the Venice Biennale 2013. To learn more about the Biennale,and the theme of the Biennale itself, click here.

- Lea Hamilton

(Source: )

4 Photos
/ Lin Xue nature bamboo ink surrealism worlds art Venice Biennale 2013 Arsenale Lea Hamilton botany landscape
Landscape Revisited
The ability for people to go into space has opened many doors in terms of exploration and knowledge of the universe, yet it has also given us a chance to look at our Earth from a different perspective.
Col. Chris Hadfield is a Canadian astronaut, currently onboard the International Space Station, who takes pictures of the Earth while on his mission in space. It is a new style of landscape photography. Previously, our only options in terms of ‘landscape’ photography were to take a picture of the Earth, on Earth, or capture the vast expanse of space via astrophotography.
Now, we can take into account the scale of the Earth; how massive desserts are, how tiny cities are. We can see both natural beauty and industrial devastation. His images are reflections of the various societies in this world, and its history. Like all great photographs, they tell stories, either about lost civilizations, daily routines or environmental changes. 
Though not everyone can just get into a spaceship and take pictures all day, what Col. Chris Hadfield is doing, is opening doors for future artists, scientists, and explorers, to see the different ways in which we can capture our surroundings, through photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Revisited
The ability for people to go into space has opened many doors in terms of exploration and knowledge of the universe, yet it has also given us a chance to look at our Earth from a different perspective.
Col. Chris Hadfield is a Canadian astronaut, currently onboard the International Space Station, who takes pictures of the Earth while on his mission in space. It is a new style of landscape photography. Previously, our only options in terms of ‘landscape’ photography were to take a picture of the Earth, on Earth, or capture the vast expanse of space via astrophotography.
Now, we can take into account the scale of the Earth; how massive desserts are, how tiny cities are. We can see both natural beauty and industrial devastation. His images are reflections of the various societies in this world, and its history. Like all great photographs, they tell stories, either about lost civilizations, daily routines or environmental changes. 
Though not everyone can just get into a spaceship and take pictures all day, what Col. Chris Hadfield is doing, is opening doors for future artists, scientists, and explorers, to see the different ways in which we can capture our surroundings, through photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Revisited
The ability for people to go into space has opened many doors in terms of exploration and knowledge of the universe, yet it has also given us a chance to look at our Earth from a different perspective.
Col. Chris Hadfield is a Canadian astronaut, currently onboard the International Space Station, who takes pictures of the Earth while on his mission in space. It is a new style of landscape photography. Previously, our only options in terms of ‘landscape’ photography were to take a picture of the Earth, on Earth, or capture the vast expanse of space via astrophotography.
Now, we can take into account the scale of the Earth; how massive desserts are, how tiny cities are. We can see both natural beauty and industrial devastation. His images are reflections of the various societies in this world, and its history. Like all great photographs, they tell stories, either about lost civilizations, daily routines or environmental changes. 
Though not everyone can just get into a spaceship and take pictures all day, what Col. Chris Hadfield is doing, is opening doors for future artists, scientists, and explorers, to see the different ways in which we can capture our surroundings, through photography.
-Anna Paluch

Landscape Revisited

The ability for people to go into space has opened many doors in terms of exploration and knowledge of the universe, yet it has also given us a chance to look at our Earth from a different perspective.

Col. Chris Hadfield is a Canadian astronaut, currently onboard the International Space Station, who takes pictures of the Earth while on his mission in space. It is a new style of landscape photography. Previously, our only options in terms of ‘landscape’ photography were to take a picture of the Earth, on Earth, or capture the vast expanse of space via astrophotography.

Now, we can take into account the scale of the Earth; how massive desserts are, how tiny cities are. We can see both natural beauty and industrial devastation. His images are reflections of the various societies in this world, and its history. Like all great photographs, they tell stories, either about lost civilizations, daily routines or environmental changes.

Though not everyone can just get into a spaceship and take pictures all day, what Col. Chris Hadfield is doing, is opening doors for future artists, scientists, and explorers, to see the different ways in which we can capture our surroundings, through photography.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ Col. Chris Hadfield astrophotography landscape photography art science art and science journal anna paluch nature space
Amy Schissel
Ottawa area artist Amy Schissel recently showed her piece Cyberfields (2012) from her series “Systems Fever” at the Volta Art Fair in New York City illustrating another sense of connection from the advancements of science and technology to (landscape) art.
Her work featured here consists of fine lines meant to mirror the seemingly invisible connections from person to person on the digital landscape, otherwise known as an Internet Map, as visualized by The Dimes Project. By exploring the question of the digital landscape in her mixed media art, Schissel seems to beg the question of where we exist (geographically, at least) when using our tech (smart phones, twitter, texting, facebook, etc.). Are the messages we send invisible, a means of communication, or do they signify something more? Are the places we send our digital messages or notes from/to representative of us—what can our digital landscapes tell us about ourselves and this brave new world we live in? So much can be understood from the connections we make every day, even those we cannot physically see.
By turning the visualization of the Internet Map into a art form of physical, tactile painting, Schissel has already, like the lines on the map, forged a connection from the digital to the traditional. 
- Rose Ekins

Amy Schissel

Ottawa area artist Amy Schissel recently showed her piece Cyberfields (2012) from her series “Systems Fever” at the Volta Art Fair in New York City illustrating another sense of connection from the advancements of science and technology to (landscape) art.

Her work featured here consists of fine lines meant to mirror the seemingly invisible connections from person to person on the digital landscape, otherwise known as an Internet Map, as visualized by The Dimes Project. By exploring the question of the digital landscape in her mixed media art, Schissel seems to beg the question of where we exist (geographically, at least) when using our tech (smart phones, twitter, texting, facebook, etc.). Are the messages we send invisible, a means of communication, or do they signify something more? Are the places we send our digital messages or notes from/to representative of us—what can our digital landscapes tell us about ourselves and this brave new world we live in? So much can be understood from the connections we make every day, even those we cannot physically see.

By turning the visualization of the Internet Map into a art form of physical, tactile painting, Schissel has already, like the lines on the map, forged a connection from the digital to the traditional. 

- Rose Ekins

art science art and science journal amy schissel rose ekins lee jones dimes project digital map internet map internet art painting landscape
Photo Friday with Chris McCaw’s Sunburn
The beauty of Chris McCaw’s photo series, Sunburn, was born out of a mistake. During a camping trip, the artist tried to capture an all night exposure of the starry sky. As a result of drinking too much whiskey, McCaw failed to wake up before sunrise to close the shutter, and the image was burned, reversing the tones of the landscape. It was a failure in that he did not capture the image he hoped for, but it turned into a much more significant perspective: one that changed his outlook on photography.
He explains this on his website: “The intense light of the rising sun was so focused and powerful that it physically changed the film, creating a new way for me to think about photography.”
Since his first, accidental, burnt photograph in 2003, McCaw has spent years trying different methods and timings to make this series. His favourite results can be found in a photobook titled Sunburn released last year
For more of McCaw’s work, please visit his website. 
-Rudayna Bahubeshi
Photo Friday with Chris McCaw’s Sunburn
The beauty of Chris McCaw’s photo series, Sunburn, was born out of a mistake. During a camping trip, the artist tried to capture an all night exposure of the starry sky. As a result of drinking too much whiskey, McCaw failed to wake up before sunrise to close the shutter, and the image was burned, reversing the tones of the landscape. It was a failure in that he did not capture the image he hoped for, but it turned into a much more significant perspective: one that changed his outlook on photography.
He explains this on his website: “The intense light of the rising sun was so focused and powerful that it physically changed the film, creating a new way for me to think about photography.”
Since his first, accidental, burnt photograph in 2003, McCaw has spent years trying different methods and timings to make this series. His favourite results can be found in a photobook titled Sunburn released last year
For more of McCaw’s work, please visit his website. 
-Rudayna Bahubeshi
Photo Friday with Chris McCaw’s Sunburn
The beauty of Chris McCaw’s photo series, Sunburn, was born out of a mistake. During a camping trip, the artist tried to capture an all night exposure of the starry sky. As a result of drinking too much whiskey, McCaw failed to wake up before sunrise to close the shutter, and the image was burned, reversing the tones of the landscape. It was a failure in that he did not capture the image he hoped for, but it turned into a much more significant perspective: one that changed his outlook on photography.
He explains this on his website: “The intense light of the rising sun was so focused and powerful that it physically changed the film, creating a new way for me to think about photography.”
Since his first, accidental, burnt photograph in 2003, McCaw has spent years trying different methods and timings to make this series. His favourite results can be found in a photobook titled Sunburn released last year
For more of McCaw’s work, please visit his website. 
-Rudayna Bahubeshi
Jason Gowans
In his project 5 Landscape Modes, Vancouver-based photographic artist Jason Gowans studies the structural implications of photographed landscapes. Exploring simultaneously the second and third dimensions, Gowans carefully deconstructs a images and rearranges them to create new landscapes with a restored depth. The result is a series of photographs that offer thoughtful alternatives to the conventional landscape practice. Gowans expands on his process:
"This show was created from physical objects. I built maquettes using found negatives, my own photographs, and images from the Internet. I photographed them to create several angles, exposures, shadows
I took many cues from Robert Smithson’s Non-Sites, Michael Snow’s La Région Centrale, and western movie sets.”
See more of Gowans’ work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Jason Gowans
In his project 5 Landscape Modes, Vancouver-based photographic artist Jason Gowans studies the structural implications of photographed landscapes. Exploring simultaneously the second and third dimensions, Gowans carefully deconstructs a images and rearranges them to create new landscapes with a restored depth. The result is a series of photographs that offer thoughtful alternatives to the conventional landscape practice. Gowans expands on his process:
"This show was created from physical objects. I built maquettes using found negatives, my own photographs, and images from the Internet. I photographed them to create several angles, exposures, shadows
I took many cues from Robert Smithson’s Non-Sites, Michael Snow’s La Région Centrale, and western movie sets.”
See more of Gowans’ work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Jason Gowans
In his project 5 Landscape Modes, Vancouver-based photographic artist Jason Gowans studies the structural implications of photographed landscapes. Exploring simultaneously the second and third dimensions, Gowans carefully deconstructs a images and rearranges them to create new landscapes with a restored depth. The result is a series of photographs that offer thoughtful alternatives to the conventional landscape practice. Gowans expands on his process:
"This show was created from physical objects. I built maquettes using found negatives, my own photographs, and images from the Internet. I photographed them to create several angles, exposures, shadows
I took many cues from Robert Smithson’s Non-Sites, Michael Snow’s La Région Centrale, and western movie sets.”
See more of Gowans’ work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Jason Gowans
In his project 5 Landscape Modes, Vancouver-based photographic artist Jason Gowans studies the structural implications of photographed landscapes. Exploring simultaneously the second and third dimensions, Gowans carefully deconstructs a images and rearranges them to create new landscapes with a restored depth. The result is a series of photographs that offer thoughtful alternatives to the conventional landscape practice. Gowans expands on his process:
"This show was created from physical objects. I built maquettes using found negatives, my own photographs, and images from the Internet. I photographed them to create several angles, exposures, shadows
I took many cues from Robert Smithson’s Non-Sites, Michael Snow’s La Région Centrale, and western movie sets.”
See more of Gowans’ work at his website here.
- Erin Saunders
Maya Lin
Maya Lin creates both art and architecture, and this is event in all of her works. Her works are inspired by landscapes and our natural environment. As her website states,
"She peers curiously at the landscape through a twenty-first century lens, merging rational and technological order with notions of beauty and the transcendental. Utilizing technological methods to study and visualize the natural world, Ms. Lin takes micro and macro views of the earth, sonar resonance scans, aerial and satellite mapping devices and translates that information into sculptures, drawings and environmental installations. Her works address how we relate and respond to the environment, and presents new ways of looking at the world around us."
For more of Lin’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Maya Lin
Maya Lin creates both art and architecture, and this is event in all of her works. Her works are inspired by landscapes and our natural environment. As her website states,
"She peers curiously at the landscape through a twenty-first century lens, merging rational and technological order with notions of beauty and the transcendental. Utilizing technological methods to study and visualize the natural world, Ms. Lin takes micro and macro views of the earth, sonar resonance scans, aerial and satellite mapping devices and translates that information into sculptures, drawings and environmental installations. Her works address how we relate and respond to the environment, and presents new ways of looking at the world around us."
For more of Lin’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Kaley Dickinson
In her works, Kaley Dickinson focuses on the connections between forms. As she states, “My art is about establishing a balance between the outer world and oneself. I work from a lot of patterns in nature and the human body including space, water, cells, nerves, rock formations, and aerial landscapes. My goal is to reveal a universal connection amongst all things.”
Dickinson starts the art process with found images and then works organically. As she describes, “My creative process is largely intuitive and flows much like a conversation with a series of actions and reactions.” Lately, the artist has been using an ancient Japanese mono-printing technique called suminagashi. Suminagashi is a meditative process that incorporates an element of chance and produces mesmerizing organic patterns. To see more of her work, click here.
- Lee Jones 
Kaley Dickinson
In her works, Kaley Dickinson focuses on the connections between forms. As she states, “My art is about establishing a balance between the outer world and oneself. I work from a lot of patterns in nature and the human body including space, water, cells, nerves, rock formations, and aerial landscapes. My goal is to reveal a universal connection amongst all things.”
Dickinson starts the art process with found images and then works organically. As she describes, “My creative process is largely intuitive and flows much like a conversation with a series of actions and reactions.” Lately, the artist has been using an ancient Japanese mono-printing technique called suminagashi. Suminagashi is a meditative process that incorporates an element of chance and produces mesmerizing organic patterns. To see more of her work, click here.
- Lee Jones 
Kaley Dickinson
In her works, Kaley Dickinson focuses on the connections between forms. As she states, “My art is about establishing a balance between the outer world and oneself. I work from a lot of patterns in nature and the human body including space, water, cells, nerves, rock formations, and aerial landscapes. My goal is to reveal a universal connection amongst all things.”
Dickinson starts the art process with found images and then works organically. As she describes, “My creative process is largely intuitive and flows much like a conversation with a series of actions and reactions.” Lately, the artist has been using an ancient Japanese mono-printing technique called suminagashi. Suminagashi is a meditative process that incorporates an element of chance and produces mesmerizing organic patterns. To see more of her work, click here.
- Lee Jones 
Kaley Dickinson
In her works, Kaley Dickinson focuses on the connections between forms. As she states, “My art is about establishing a balance between the outer world and oneself. I work from a lot of patterns in nature and the human body including space, water, cells, nerves, rock formations, and aerial landscapes. My goal is to reveal a universal connection amongst all things.”
Dickinson starts the art process with found images and then works organically. As she describes, “My creative process is largely intuitive and flows much like a conversation with a series of actions and reactions.” Lately, the artist has been using an ancient Japanese mono-printing technique called suminagashi. Suminagashi is a meditative process that incorporates an element of chance and produces mesmerizing organic patterns. To see more of her work, click here.
- Lee Jones 
Daniel Ehrenworth
Daniel Ehrenworth’s Sky / Water is a contemporary, conceptual interpretation of a common practice in early photography. After cameras became more widely accessible in the mid 19th century, accurate captures of landscape views were frustratingly elusive, as lengthy exposure times meant that some details were lost in the development process. Limitations in the collodion process meant that landscape photographs often ended up showing an empty white sky and a large dark mass in the foreground; details and gradations had to yield to these slow exposure times and collodion’s poor receptivity to certain colours. Photographers like the French Gustave Le Gray solved this problem by taking two separate negatives – one that captured the detail of the sky and another that isolated the details of the sea or land – and physically cutting and pasting the two properly-rendered parts to make a composite. In this way, the technical and chemical limitations of photography were answered by manipulation in the darkroom.
Erhenworth builds on this practice with composite photographs that actually show inconsistencies in depth and perspective – the very problems these earlier photographers were trying to avoid. The result is a set of photos of actual places combined to form imaginary, impossible ones.
See more Daniel Erhenworth here, and read more about early composite photography here.
-  Erin Saunders
Daniel Ehrenworth
Daniel Ehrenworth’s Sky / Water is a contemporary, conceptual interpretation of a common practice in early photography. After cameras became more widely accessible in the mid 19th century, accurate captures of landscape views were frustratingly elusive, as lengthy exposure times meant that some details were lost in the development process. Limitations in the collodion process meant that landscape photographs often ended up showing an empty white sky and a large dark mass in the foreground; details and gradations had to yield to these slow exposure times and collodion’s poor receptivity to certain colours. Photographers like the French Gustave Le Gray solved this problem by taking two separate negatives – one that captured the detail of the sky and another that isolated the details of the sea or land – and physically cutting and pasting the two properly-rendered parts to make a composite. In this way, the technical and chemical limitations of photography were answered by manipulation in the darkroom.
Erhenworth builds on this practice with composite photographs that actually show inconsistencies in depth and perspective – the very problems these earlier photographers were trying to avoid. The result is a set of photos of actual places combined to form imaginary, impossible ones.
See more Daniel Erhenworth here, and read more about early composite photography here.
-  Erin Saunders
Daniel Ehrenworth
Daniel Ehrenworth’s Sky / Water is a contemporary, conceptual interpretation of a common practice in early photography. After cameras became more widely accessible in the mid 19th century, accurate captures of landscape views were frustratingly elusive, as lengthy exposure times meant that some details were lost in the development process. Limitations in the collodion process meant that landscape photographs often ended up showing an empty white sky and a large dark mass in the foreground; details and gradations had to yield to these slow exposure times and collodion’s poor receptivity to certain colours. Photographers like the French Gustave Le Gray solved this problem by taking two separate negatives – one that captured the detail of the sky and another that isolated the details of the sea or land – and physically cutting and pasting the two properly-rendered parts to make a composite. In this way, the technical and chemical limitations of photography were answered by manipulation in the darkroom.
Erhenworth builds on this practice with composite photographs that actually show inconsistencies in depth and perspective – the very problems these earlier photographers were trying to avoid. The result is a set of photos of actual places combined to form imaginary, impossible ones.
See more Daniel Erhenworth here, and read more about early composite photography here.
-  Erin Saunders

Daniel Ehrenworth

Daniel Ehrenworth’s Sky / Water is a contemporary, conceptual interpretation of a common practice in early photography. After cameras became more widely accessible in the mid 19th century, accurate captures of landscape views were frustratingly elusive, as lengthy exposure times meant that some details were lost in the development process. Limitations in the collodion process meant that landscape photographs often ended up showing an empty white sky and a large dark mass in the foreground; details and gradations had to yield to these slow exposure times and collodion’s poor receptivity to certain colours. Photographers like the French Gustave Le Gray solved this problem by taking two separate negatives – one that captured the detail of the sky and another that isolated the details of the sea or land – and physically cutting and pasting the two properly-rendered parts to make a composite. In this way, the technical and chemical limitations of photography were answered by manipulation in the darkroom.

Erhenworth builds on this practice with composite photographs that actually show inconsistencies in depth and perspective – the very problems these earlier photographers were trying to avoid. The result is a set of photos of actual places combined to form imaginary, impossible ones.

See more Daniel Erhenworth here, and read more about early composite photography here.

-  Erin Saunders

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art daniel ehrenworth artscience photography composite photography landscape sky gustave le gray

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