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Kickstarter for Little Robot Friends by Aesthetec

Aesthetec, an interaction design and technology company from Toronto, has developed cute little robots with their own unique and customizable personalities. Their Kickstarter project, called Little Robot Friends, includes beginner sets all the way up to developer kits. These little robots include smart technologies. As the team describes the little friends:

They can sense the amount of light in a room, they can hear with a small integrated microphone, they can detect your touch and they can also communicate with other Little Robot Friends using infrared light (like your TV remote). They have two RGB LED eyes and a 250mW speaker for expressing their current mood. The brain is an 8-bit 32K microcontroller that provides a lot of space for coding behaviours and storing memories.”

They can become your friend, and even friends with each other. With the customizable kit, you can set your robot’s personality on 6 different settings - from brave to timid, happy to angry and several others.

The project was inspired by Aesthetec’s first venture into personalized robots. Their exhibit Nicebots (2004), which was at the Modern Art Museum in Nice, France, included 30 robots who roamed the museum. As the team describes the project, “By the end of the project we had 30 robots, each with their own quirks and charms.”

You can see more of Aesthetec’s interactive projects on their website. 

- Lee Jones

artdesigntechnologyaestheteclittle robot friendskickstartertorontolee jones
Anthony Scavarelli’s “Self-Reflection”
Technology is often characterized as cold and lonely, but when done right the thing we see as so un-human can actually have the opposite effect. In his work the artist Anthony Scavarelli, who completed his masters in Human-Computer Interaction at Carleton University, uses technology to explore human emotional response and attachment.
For Nuit Blanche Ottawa and Gatineau, an all night event on September 21st, Scavarelli will be presenting “Self-Reflection”. The work is an experiment in affective touch, which is touch that elicits an emotional reaction or connection. In the installation audience members will touch a structure covered in soft fabric. The silhouette of a small child will react to the viewer with happiness, anger, sadness or indifference depending on how they touch the artwork.
“I have always been fascinated by the concept of an inner or forgotten child,” said Scavarelli. “When we were children we had so many dreams, and into adulthood we have either done that child proud, forgotten them, or possibly failed them. By allowing a simple method for us to interact with this child in a more literal sense, I hope to build an emotional connection between the child silhouette and the viewer.”
Scavarelli views this work as an experiment in self-discovery. As he questions, “Does the audience’s interaction with the child silhouette possibly become a reflection of how they view themselves?”
The structure will be made with some help from Henri Kuschkowitz, who with Scavarelli forms the artistic group, the Luminartists. The group is known for developing interactive installations in public spaces that aim to visualize messages, but also draw the audience to become part of the experience. Scavarelli has a history of impressive installations throughout Ottawa (with one even going up at Art & Science Journal’s summer residence - Invest Ottawa), so “Self-Reflections” will no doubt be an exciting addition to the Nuit Blanche lineup. 
- Lee Jones
Anthony Scavarelli’s “Self-Reflection”
Technology is often characterized as cold and lonely, but when done right the thing we see as so un-human can actually have the opposite effect. In his work the artist Anthony Scavarelli, who completed his masters in Human-Computer Interaction at Carleton University, uses technology to explore human emotional response and attachment.
For Nuit Blanche Ottawa and Gatineau, an all night event on September 21st, Scavarelli will be presenting “Self-Reflection”. The work is an experiment in affective touch, which is touch that elicits an emotional reaction or connection. In the installation audience members will touch a structure covered in soft fabric. The silhouette of a small child will react to the viewer with happiness, anger, sadness or indifference depending on how they touch the artwork.
“I have always been fascinated by the concept of an inner or forgotten child,” said Scavarelli. “When we were children we had so many dreams, and into adulthood we have either done that child proud, forgotten them, or possibly failed them. By allowing a simple method for us to interact with this child in a more literal sense, I hope to build an emotional connection between the child silhouette and the viewer.”
Scavarelli views this work as an experiment in self-discovery. As he questions, “Does the audience’s interaction with the child silhouette possibly become a reflection of how they view themselves?”
The structure will be made with some help from Henri Kuschkowitz, who with Scavarelli forms the artistic group, the Luminartists. The group is known for developing interactive installations in public spaces that aim to visualize messages, but also draw the audience to become part of the experience. Scavarelli has a history of impressive installations throughout Ottawa (with one even going up at Art & Science Journal’s summer residence - Invest Ottawa), so “Self-Reflections” will no doubt be an exciting addition to the Nuit Blanche lineup. 
- Lee Jones

Anthony Scavarelli’s “Self-Reflection”

Technology is often characterized as cold and lonely, but when done right the thing we see as so un-human can actually have the opposite effect. In his work the artist Anthony Scavarelli, who completed his masters in Human-Computer Interaction at Carleton University, uses technology to explore human emotional response and attachment.

For Nuit Blanche Ottawa and Gatineau, an all night event on September 21st, Scavarelli will be presenting “Self-Reflection”. The work is an experiment in affective touch, which is touch that elicits an emotional reaction or connection. In the installation audience members will touch a structure covered in soft fabric. The silhouette of a small child will react to the viewer with happiness, anger, sadness or indifference depending on how they touch the artwork.

“I have always been fascinated by the concept of an inner or forgotten child,” said Scavarelli. “When we were children we had so many dreams, and into adulthood we have either done that child proud, forgotten them, or possibly failed them. By allowing a simple method for us to interact with this child in a more literal sense, I hope to build an emotional connection between the child silhouette and the viewer.”

Scavarelli views this work as an experiment in self-discovery. As he questions, “Does the audience’s interaction with the child silhouette possibly become a reflection of how they view themselves?”

The structure will be made with some help from Henri Kuschkowitz, who with Scavarelli forms the artistic group, the Luminartists. The group is known for developing interactive installations in public spaces that aim to visualize messages, but also draw the audience to become part of the experience. Scavarelli has a history of impressive installations throughout Ottawa (with one even going up at Art & Science Journal’s summer residence - Invest Ottawa), so “Self-Reflections” will no doubt be an exciting addition to the Nuit Blanche lineup. 

- Lee Jones

2 Photos
/ art and science technology ottawa nuit blanche anthony scavarelli lee jones
Sterilisation
Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).
In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”
Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy. 
- Lee Jones
Sterilisation
Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).
In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”
Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy. 
- Lee Jones
Sterilisation
Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).
In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”
Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy. 
- Lee Jones
Sterilisation
Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).
In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”
Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy. 
- Lee Jones

Sterilisation

Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).

In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 

It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”

Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy

- Lee Jones

4 Photos
/ art photography science mitch payne lee jones sterilisation sterilization zena may hendrick gemma fletcher
Jake Evill’s Cortex: Exoskeleton Protecting the Internal Skeleton
Cortex is a project that aims to replace casts, and get rid of all the sweaty, uncomfortable experiences that go along with them. As Jake Evill describes the issues behind this work,
"After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike, the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex Exoskeletal Cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and extremely cool!"
It’s so great when design solves the problems of everyday life. In his analysis of the cast and its impact, Evill goes through all the pros and cons of casts (both plaster and fiberglass). Basically, casts suck. They’re heavy, uncomfortable, get in the way of having showers, bad for the environment, and they sometimes even smell. Ew! On the plus side, plaster is low cost, low tech, and easily moldable. Fiberglass is light and strong. But it’s not one or the other, cheap or great, Evill has come up with a way to capture everything needed in a cast. This type of innovative thinking, of capturing it all, is getting me more and more excited about the possibilities of 3D printers. To check out Evill’s portfolio, click here. 
- Lee Jones
P.S. Drop us a line - what do you think 3D printers should do next?
Jake Evill’s Cortex: Exoskeleton Protecting the Internal Skeleton
Cortex is a project that aims to replace casts, and get rid of all the sweaty, uncomfortable experiences that go along with them. As Jake Evill describes the issues behind this work,
"After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike, the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex Exoskeletal Cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and extremely cool!"
It’s so great when design solves the problems of everyday life. In his analysis of the cast and its impact, Evill goes through all the pros and cons of casts (both plaster and fiberglass). Basically, casts suck. They’re heavy, uncomfortable, get in the way of having showers, bad for the environment, and they sometimes even smell. Ew! On the plus side, plaster is low cost, low tech, and easily moldable. Fiberglass is light and strong. But it’s not one or the other, cheap or great, Evill has come up with a way to capture everything needed in a cast. This type of innovative thinking, of capturing it all, is getting me more and more excited about the possibilities of 3D printers. To check out Evill’s portfolio, click here. 
- Lee Jones
P.S. Drop us a line - what do you think 3D printers should do next?
Jake Evill’s Cortex: Exoskeleton Protecting the Internal Skeleton
Cortex is a project that aims to replace casts, and get rid of all the sweaty, uncomfortable experiences that go along with them. As Jake Evill describes the issues behind this work,
"After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike, the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex Exoskeletal Cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and extremely cool!"
It’s so great when design solves the problems of everyday life. In his analysis of the cast and its impact, Evill goes through all the pros and cons of casts (both plaster and fiberglass). Basically, casts suck. They’re heavy, uncomfortable, get in the way of having showers, bad for the environment, and they sometimes even smell. Ew! On the plus side, plaster is low cost, low tech, and easily moldable. Fiberglass is light and strong. But it’s not one or the other, cheap or great, Evill has come up with a way to capture everything needed in a cast. This type of innovative thinking, of capturing it all, is getting me more and more excited about the possibilities of 3D printers. To check out Evill’s portfolio, click here. 
- Lee Jones
P.S. Drop us a line - what do you think 3D printers should do next?
Jake Evill’s Cortex: Exoskeleton Protecting the Internal Skeleton
Cortex is a project that aims to replace casts, and get rid of all the sweaty, uncomfortable experiences that go along with them. As Jake Evill describes the issues behind this work,
"After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike, the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex Exoskeletal Cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and extremely cool!"
It’s so great when design solves the problems of everyday life. In his analysis of the cast and its impact, Evill goes through all the pros and cons of casts (both plaster and fiberglass). Basically, casts suck. They’re heavy, uncomfortable, get in the way of having showers, bad for the environment, and they sometimes even smell. Ew! On the plus side, plaster is low cost, low tech, and easily moldable. Fiberglass is light and strong. But it’s not one or the other, cheap or great, Evill has come up with a way to capture everything needed in a cast. This type of innovative thinking, of capturing it all, is getting me more and more excited about the possibilities of 3D printers. To check out Evill’s portfolio, click here. 
- Lee Jones
P.S. Drop us a line - what do you think 3D printers should do next?
Jake Evill’s Cortex: Exoskeleton Protecting the Internal Skeleton
Cortex is a project that aims to replace casts, and get rid of all the sweaty, uncomfortable experiences that go along with them. As Jake Evill describes the issues behind this work,
"After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike, the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex Exoskeletal Cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and extremely cool!"
It’s so great when design solves the problems of everyday life. In his analysis of the cast and its impact, Evill goes through all the pros and cons of casts (both plaster and fiberglass). Basically, casts suck. They’re heavy, uncomfortable, get in the way of having showers, bad for the environment, and they sometimes even smell. Ew! On the plus side, plaster is low cost, low tech, and easily moldable. Fiberglass is light and strong. But it’s not one or the other, cheap or great, Evill has come up with a way to capture everything needed in a cast. This type of innovative thinking, of capturing it all, is getting me more and more excited about the possibilities of 3D printers. To check out Evill’s portfolio, click here. 
- Lee Jones
P.S. Drop us a line - what do you think 3D printers should do next?

Jake Evill’s Cortex: Exoskeleton Protecting the Internal Skeleton

Cortex is a project that aims to replace casts, and get rid of all the sweaty, uncomfortable experiences that go along with them. As Jake Evill describes the issues behind this work,

"After many centuries of splints and cumbersome plaster casts that have been the itchy and smelly bane of millions of children, adults and the aged alike, the world over, we at last bring fracture support into the 21st century. The Cortex Exoskeletal Cast provides a highly technical and trauma zone localized support system that is fully ventilated, super light, shower friendly, hygienic, recyclable and extremely cool!"

It’s so great when design solves the problems of everyday life. In his analysis of the cast and its impact, Evill goes through all the pros and cons of casts (both plaster and fiberglass). Basically, casts suck. They’re heavy, uncomfortable, get in the way of having showers, bad for the environment, and they sometimes even smell. Ew! On the plus side, plaster is low cost, low tech, and easily moldable. Fiberglass is light and strong. But it’s not one or the other, cheap or great, Evill has come up with a way to capture everything needed in a cast. This type of innovative thinking, of capturing it all, is getting me more and more excited about the possibilities of 3D printers. To check out Evill’s portfolio, click here. 

- Lee Jones

P.S. Drop us a line - what do you think 3D printers should do next?

5 Photos
/ design Jake Evill Cortex Cortex Exoskeleton cast 3D Printing Lee Jones
Amy Schissel
Ottawa area artist Amy Schissel recently showed her piece Cyberfields (2012) from her series “Systems Fever” at the Volta Art Fair in New York City illustrating another sense of connection from the advancements of science and technology to (landscape) art.
Her work featured here consists of fine lines meant to mirror the seemingly invisible connections from person to person on the digital landscape, otherwise known as an Internet Map, as visualized by The Dimes Project. By exploring the question of the digital landscape in her mixed media art, Schissel seems to beg the question of where we exist (geographically, at least) when using our tech (smart phones, twitter, texting, facebook, etc.). Are the messages we send invisible, a means of communication, or do they signify something more? Are the places we send our digital messages or notes from/to representative of us—what can our digital landscapes tell us about ourselves and this brave new world we live in? So much can be understood from the connections we make every day, even those we cannot physically see.
By turning the visualization of the Internet Map into a art form of physical, tactile painting, Schissel has already, like the lines on the map, forged a connection from the digital to the traditional. 
- Rose Ekins

Amy Schissel

Ottawa area artist Amy Schissel recently showed her piece Cyberfields (2012) from her series “Systems Fever” at the Volta Art Fair in New York City illustrating another sense of connection from the advancements of science and technology to (landscape) art.

Her work featured here consists of fine lines meant to mirror the seemingly invisible connections from person to person on the digital landscape, otherwise known as an Internet Map, as visualized by The Dimes Project. By exploring the question of the digital landscape in her mixed media art, Schissel seems to beg the question of where we exist (geographically, at least) when using our tech (smart phones, twitter, texting, facebook, etc.). Are the messages we send invisible, a means of communication, or do they signify something more? Are the places we send our digital messages or notes from/to representative of us—what can our digital landscapes tell us about ourselves and this brave new world we live in? So much can be understood from the connections we make every day, even those we cannot physically see.

By turning the visualization of the Internet Map into a art form of physical, tactile painting, Schissel has already, like the lines on the map, forged a connection from the digital to the traditional. 

- Rose Ekins

art science art and science journal amy schissel rose ekins lee jones dimes project digital map internet map internet art painting landscape
Gravity by mrmama.tv
In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,
"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."
But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 
- Lee Jones
Gravity by mrmama.tv
In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,
"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."
But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 
- Lee Jones
Gravity by mrmama.tv
In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,
"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."
But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 
- Lee Jones
Gravity by mrmama.tv
In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,
"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."
But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 
- Lee Jones

Gravity by mrmama.tv

In this series of .gif’s (which you can see here, the files together were too large for tumblr!) mrmama.tv created an artwork for two environments, the gallery and the internet. Arek Nowakowski, a motion designer for the project, told us about Gravity. As he states,

"This is a variation on time and movement. A clash of various forces creates a visual performance that surrounds us every day. Gravity is one of these forces and looking at the achieved pictures we have a feeling that everything is immersed in it, like an insect immersed in amber. I decided to stop a very dynamic situation in order to have access to those moments that pass too quickly to have a good look at them. AnimGifs are such ambers with frozen moments in which we were immersed."

But how does it work? By using the time slice technique, the group took shots and then spun them in an endless loop using .gif’s. The end result is that the subjects appear to be flying in circles. But the images are not on par with the final project, so see them in full here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art science artscience gif technology mrmama lee jones
Sasha vom Dorp
Sasha vom Dorp is an artist who works with vibrations. In his most recent series, Sound Bending Light, vom Dorp explores the dynamic interplay of light, sound and water. To create this series he made a machine that would bring all these elements together. As he describes the series,
“These photographs aim to capture the beauty and turmoil that occurs inside the most pedestrian events. Sunlight bounces on water; sound waves march toward oblivion.”
 To see more of vom Dorp’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Sasha vom Dorp
Sasha vom Dorp is an artist who works with vibrations. In his most recent series, Sound Bending Light, vom Dorp explores the dynamic interplay of light, sound and water. To create this series he made a machine that would bring all these elements together. As he describes the series,
“These photographs aim to capture the beauty and turmoil that occurs inside the most pedestrian events. Sunlight bounces on water; sound waves march toward oblivion.”
 To see more of vom Dorp’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Sasha vom Dorp
Sasha vom Dorp is an artist who works with vibrations. In his most recent series, Sound Bending Light, vom Dorp explores the dynamic interplay of light, sound and water. To create this series he made a machine that would bring all these elements together. As he describes the series,
“These photographs aim to capture the beauty and turmoil that occurs inside the most pedestrian events. Sunlight bounces on water; sound waves march toward oblivion.”
 To see more of vom Dorp’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Reads and Zines with The Science of Culture and the Phenomenology of Styles
In The Science of Culture and the Phenomenology of Styles, Renato Barilli examines the history of artistic style in relation to scientific discovery. Applying an innovative analysis, he illustrates the subtle, yet intrinsic, connection between paradigm shifts in the sciences and in the arts. 
Throughout the book Barilli argues that there are connections between specific discoveries or inventions and revolutionary advances in artistic techniques. He draws upon the pioneering work of Lucien Goldman, as well as the theories of Luciano Anceschi and Marshall McLuhan in order to reassess conventional modes of dividing art history into such periods as modern, contemporary, and postmodern. By correlating moments such as the invention of the printing press and the internal combustion engine with canonical periods in the evolution of art, Barilli unearths conceptual links across domains and disciplines. In doing so, Barilli connects fields to create a more comprehensive idea of historical discovery.
For more information on Barilli’s book published by McGill-Queen’s University Press, click here.
[text from McGill-Queen’s University Press]
- Lee Jones 
Kelly Jaclynn Andres: The Temporary Archive for Ambiguous Architectures
What if you could completely recreate a space with a 3D Printer? For The Temporary Archive, artist Kelly Jaclynn Andres did just that. Through her project, objects were collected from a specific site, tagged and digitally scanned using a 3D scanner. Both the contents of the fieldwork and physical aspects of the geographical site were digitally modeled and printed in 3D to develop three miniature environments. Each object, microorganism or plant subject collected from the site is recreated in one of three glass rectangular prisms. The installation is part of Andres’s residency at Eastern Bloc. As they describe the installation,
"The Temporary Archive explores the overlap between the imagined, the speculative, the subjective, and the “experiment.” It is an investigation into the sensitive nature of working between site, technical processes, material-objects, and living organisms. The work combines digital and biological reproduction to echo complex symbiotic relationships between animals, plants, environments and objects."
For those of you interested in attending the installation it will be on from the 7th to the 9th of December at Eastern Bloc, New Media Production & Exhibition Centre, with a vernissage on December 6th at 6pm. For more on Andres’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Kelly Jaclynn Andres: The Temporary Archive for Ambiguous Architectures
What if you could completely recreate a space with a 3D Printer? For The Temporary Archive, artist Kelly Jaclynn Andres did just that. Through her project, objects were collected from a specific site, tagged and digitally scanned using a 3D scanner. Both the contents of the fieldwork and physical aspects of the geographical site were digitally modeled and printed in 3D to develop three miniature environments. Each object, microorganism or plant subject collected from the site is recreated in one of three glass rectangular prisms. The installation is part of Andres’s residency at Eastern Bloc. As they describe the installation,
"The Temporary Archive explores the overlap between the imagined, the speculative, the subjective, and the “experiment.” It is an investigation into the sensitive nature of working between site, technical processes, material-objects, and living organisms. The work combines digital and biological reproduction to echo complex symbiotic relationships between animals, plants, environments and objects."
For those of you interested in attending the installation it will be on from the 7th to the 9th of December at Eastern Bloc, New Media Production & Exhibition Centre, with a vernissage on December 6th at 6pm. For more on Andres’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Simon F. Park
A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  
"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."
As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Simon F. Park
A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  
"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."
As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Simon F. Park
A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  
"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."
As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Simon F. Park
A Senior Lecturer in Molecular Bacteriology at University of Surrey, Simon F. Park’s artworks are driven by a need to correct the common misconception that microbiological life is primitive and always detrimental. As Park states,  
"I hope that through my art, and collaborations with artists, that the real and sublime nature of the microbiological world can be revealed. I also find the interface between arts and science to be a powerfully pluripotent one, that can occasionally give rise to outliers and thus new avenues of scientific investigation."
As a microbiologist, Park works mostly with microorganisms and uses them to explore the inherent creativity of the natural world and to reveal its subtle, and usually hidden, narratives. But, rather than imposing any strict human-centred design upon the organisms that he works with, he prefers to evoke them as  co-authors in the creative process so that important events that many of us often overlook, or fail to consider intimately, become manifest. To see more of Park’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones

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For submissions: please send images and a detailed description to our editor, Lee Jones, at leejones@artandsciencejournal.com.
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