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Reads and Zines with The Universe Within 
In The Universe Within, Neil Shubin ambitiously traces the history of the universe and the story of evolution through the bodies and remains of all living things on Earth. Seeking to better understand how we have come to be, Shubin’s quest results in the discovery of connections between human and animal physiologies and the wider cosmos. While this may seem like a rather difficult and and confusing connection to make, the book reads so much like an adventure novel that you forget it is actually a work of scientific inquiry that ultimately shifts the way we see humanity. 
Shubin, a prominent palaeontologist, provides fascinating facts and stimulating comparisons easily understood by anyone with even the slightest knowledge of science, astronomy, biology, and evolution. However, Shubin by no means “dumbs down” the science he writes about here. Instead, his enthusiasm for scientific discourse shines through in his highly entertaining and enthusiastic writing style. 
Shubin’s enthusiasm is notedly demonstrated in his recounting of major historic anecdotes that pepper his research. One example is Shubin’s account of how geologists Marie Tharp and Bruce Heezen mapped the ocean floor and how their discovery of mid-ocean ridges ultimately led to our contemporary theories of continental drift and the Earth’s tectonic plates. Shubin’s focus on the stories of major discoveries, as well as the science behind them, reads like an account of how the undertakings of various scientific disciplines are all connected by a shared desire to unearth the secrets of life in the universe.
Overall, I found this book ambitious, quick paced, and highly enjoyable. A definite must-read for a slightly more basic understanding of how the universe was formed and how forces in the cosmos and on Earth have shaped our contemporary world. 
For more information about Dr. Shubin and The Universe Within, visit his website here. The Universe Within is available on Amazon for $18.15 CAD. 
- Victoria Nolte

Reads and Zines with The Universe Within 
In The Universe Within, Neil Shubin ambitiously traces the history of the universe and the story of evolution through the bodies and remains of all living things on Earth. Seeking to better understand how we have come to be, Shubin’s quest results in the discovery of connections between human and animal physiologies and the wider cosmos. While this may seem like a rather difficult and and confusing connection to make, the book reads so much like an adventure novel that you forget it is actually a work of scientific inquiry that ultimately shifts the way we see humanity. 
Shubin, a prominent palaeontologist, provides fascinating facts and stimulating comparisons easily understood by anyone with even the slightest knowledge of science, astronomy, biology, and evolution. However, Shubin by no means “dumbs down” the science he writes about here. Instead, his enthusiasm for scientific discourse shines through in his highly entertaining and enthusiastic writing style. 
Shubin’s enthusiasm is notedly demonstrated in his recounting of major historic anecdotes that pepper his research. One example is Shubin’s account of how geologists Marie Tharp and Bruce Heezen mapped the ocean floor and how their discovery of mid-ocean ridges ultimately led to our contemporary theories of continental drift and the Earth’s tectonic plates. Shubin’s focus on the stories of major discoveries, as well as the science behind them, reads like an account of how the undertakings of various scientific disciplines are all connected by a shared desire to unearth the secrets of life in the universe.
Overall, I found this book ambitious, quick paced, and highly enjoyable. A definite must-read for a slightly more basic understanding of how the universe was formed and how forces in the cosmos and on Earth have shaped our contemporary world. 
For more information about Dr. Shubin and The Universe Within, visit his website here. The Universe Within is available on Amazon for $18.15 CAD. 
- Victoria Nolte

Reads and Zines with The Universe Within 

In The Universe Within, Neil Shubin ambitiously traces the history of the universe and the story of evolution through the bodies and remains of all living things on Earth. Seeking to better understand how we have come to be, Shubin’s quest results in the discovery of connections between human and animal physiologies and the wider cosmos. While this may seem like a rather difficult and and confusing connection to make, the book reads so much like an adventure novel that you forget it is actually a work of scientific inquiry that ultimately shifts the way we see humanity. 

Shubin, a prominent palaeontologist, provides fascinating facts and stimulating comparisons easily understood by anyone with even the slightest knowledge of science, astronomy, biology, and evolution. However, Shubin by no means “dumbs down” the science he writes about here. Instead, his enthusiasm for scientific discourse shines through in his highly entertaining and enthusiastic writing style. 

Shubin’s enthusiasm is notedly demonstrated in his recounting of major historic anecdotes that pepper his research. One example is Shubin’s account of how geologists Marie Tharp and Bruce Heezen mapped the ocean floor and how their discovery of mid-ocean ridges ultimately led to our contemporary theories of continental drift and the Earth’s tectonic plates. Shubin’s focus on the stories of major discoveries, as well as the science behind them, reads like an account of how the undertakings of various scientific disciplines are all connected by a shared desire to unearth the secrets of life in the universe.

Overall, I found this book ambitious, quick paced, and highly enjoyable. A definite must-read for a slightly more basic understanding of how the universe was formed and how forces in the cosmos and on Earth have shaped our contemporary world. 

For more information about Dr. Shubin and The Universe Within, visit his website hereThe Universe Within is available on Amazon for $18.15 CAD. 

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

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/ reads & zines review the universe within neil shubin palaeontology cosmos literature victoria nolte
Reads and Zines with Proust was a Neuroscientist by Jonah Lehrer
The human brain is a complex organ that allows us to think, move, feel, see, hear, taste, and smell. It controls our body, receives information, analyzes information, and stores information to create our memories.The brain produces electrical signals, which, together with chemical reactions, let the parts of the body communicate. Nerves send these signals throughout the body.
Does it sound like a neurobiology introduction definition? What if I told you all of this was discovered by one of the greatest French writers—Marcel Proust. This is what Jonah Lehrer argues in his novel Proust Was a Neuroscientist. Science did not get there first, art did! Lehrer gives hope by showing why reducing everything to atoms and genes may close our mind to the outstanding discoveries made by artists. Accumulating data and understanding them are not the same process. One focuses on discipline and precisions, while the other focuses on imagination and creativity.
In a wonderful mixture of analysis, scientific articles, biographies and critics, Lehrer will show how a painter, a poet, a chef, a composer, and a handful of novelists led the path to modern discoveries such as the fifth taste (unami), the brain’s malleability, the subtleties of vision and the deep structure of language. Science and art can be ingenious partners, combining the best of both produces effects of awe.
Proust was a Neuroscientist is now available on Amazon. 
- Amelie Bigras
* Editor’s Note: We’ve just been informed that Lehrer has been accused of being…shall we say… creative in his writing. Thank you for the responses, and please be warned that this work might carry elements of fiction.

Reads and Zines with Proust was a Neuroscientist by Jonah Lehrer

The human brain is a complex organ that allows us to think, move, feel, see, hear, taste, and smell. It controls our body, receives information, analyzes information, and stores information to create our memories.The brain produces electrical signals, which, together with chemical reactions, let the parts of the body communicate. Nerves send these signals throughout the body.


Does it sound like a neurobiology introduction definition? What if I told you all of this was discovered by one of the greatest French writers—Marcel Proust. This is what Jonah Lehrer argues in his novel Proust Was a Neuroscientist. Science did not get there first, art did! Lehrer gives hope by showing why reducing everything to atoms and genes may close our mind to the outstanding discoveries made by artists. Accumulating data and understanding them are not the same process. One focuses on discipline and precisions, while the other focuses on imagination and creativity.

In a wonderful mixture of analysis, scientific articles, biographies and critics, Lehrer will show how a painter, a poet, a chef, a composer, and a handful of novelists led the path to modern discoveries such as the fifth taste (unami), the brain’s malleability, the subtleties of vision and the deep structure of language. Science and art can be ingenious partners, combining the best of both produces effects of awe.

Proust was a Neuroscientist is now available on Amazon

- Amelie Bigras

* Editor’s Note: We’ve just been informed that Lehrer has been accused of being…shall we say… creative in his writing. Thank you for the responses, and please be warned that this work might carry elements of fiction.

art science literature proust was a neuroscientist jonah lehrer amelie bigras

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