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Fragile Viruses
Viruses are scary enough as small micro-organisms that we cannot see with the naked eye, but artist Luke Jerram takes these deadly microscopic agents, and blows them up, literally, as glass sculptures.
Instead of the usual cartoons found in textbooks, these viruses can be examined from various angles, to understand their structures better. Great detail is put into each piece, making the glass sculptures practically exact replicas. Aesthetically, the work is beautiful, and few would even know that what they are admiring are the structures of an HIV virus, E. coli or even Smallpox. 
The sculptures allow viewers to better understand, or at least to finally see for themselves, what attacks their immune (or other) systems, and especially what causes them to be sick. Of course, this does not mean that it will be easier to fight a virus if you know what it looks like, but for science, the sculptures are a great learning tool to understand the virus’ structures, and possibly even to recognize them better when looking under a microscope.
-Anna Paluch
Fragile Viruses
Viruses are scary enough as small micro-organisms that we cannot see with the naked eye, but artist Luke Jerram takes these deadly microscopic agents, and blows them up, literally, as glass sculptures.
Instead of the usual cartoons found in textbooks, these viruses can be examined from various angles, to understand their structures better. Great detail is put into each piece, making the glass sculptures practically exact replicas. Aesthetically, the work is beautiful, and few would even know that what they are admiring are the structures of an HIV virus, E. coli or even Smallpox. 
The sculptures allow viewers to better understand, or at least to finally see for themselves, what attacks their immune (or other) systems, and especially what causes them to be sick. Of course, this does not mean that it will be easier to fight a virus if you know what it looks like, but for science, the sculptures are a great learning tool to understand the virus’ structures, and possibly even to recognize them better when looking under a microscope.
-Anna Paluch

Fragile Viruses

Viruses are scary enough as small micro-organisms that we cannot see with the naked eye, but artist Luke Jerram takes these deadly microscopic agents, and blows them up, literally, as glass sculptures.

Instead of the usual cartoons found in textbooks, these viruses can be examined from various angles, to understand their structures better. Great detail is put into each piece, making the glass sculptures practically exact replicas. Aesthetically, the work is beautiful, and few would even know that what they are admiring are the structures of an HIV virus, E. coli or even Smallpox

The sculptures allow viewers to better understand, or at least to finally see for themselves, what attacks their immune (or other) systems, and especially what causes them to be sick. Of course, this does not mean that it will be easier to fight a virus if you know what it looks like, but for science, the sculptures are a great learning tool to understand the virus’ structures, and possibly even to recognize them better when looking under a microscope.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
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Luke Jerram’s Aeolus: an Acoustic Wind Pavilion 
Luke Jerram Aeolus allows viewers to experience the changes in the wind. The title of the work comes from Greeky mythology and means the ruler of the four winds. As the artist describes the work,
“The sculpture a giant aeolian harp, designed to resonate and sing with the wind without any electrical power or amplification. Vibrations in strings attached to some of the tubes are transferred through skins covering the tops, and projected down through the tubes towards the viewer standing beneath the arch. For those tubes without strings attached, the tubes are tuned to an aeolian scale and hum at a series of low frequencies even when its not windy.”
You can listen to the artwork below:

For more information on Jerram’s works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
p.s.! Aeolus is now up for auction with a starting bid of just £1 plus the costs of delivery and installation. Individuals, businesses, organizations and institutions from around the world can participate in this sealed bid auction. The deadline for your sealed bids is 1st July 2013. Click here for more information.
Luke Jerram’s Aeolus: an Acoustic Wind Pavilion 
Luke Jerram Aeolus allows viewers to experience the changes in the wind. The title of the work comes from Greeky mythology and means the ruler of the four winds. As the artist describes the work,
“The sculpture a giant aeolian harp, designed to resonate and sing with the wind without any electrical power or amplification. Vibrations in strings attached to some of the tubes are transferred through skins covering the tops, and projected down through the tubes towards the viewer standing beneath the arch. For those tubes without strings attached, the tubes are tuned to an aeolian scale and hum at a series of low frequencies even when its not windy.”
You can listen to the artwork below:

For more information on Jerram’s works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
p.s.! Aeolus is now up for auction with a starting bid of just £1 plus the costs of delivery and installation. Individuals, businesses, organizations and institutions from around the world can participate in this sealed bid auction. The deadline for your sealed bids is 1st July 2013. Click here for more information.

Luke Jerram’s Aeolus: an Acoustic Wind Pavilion 

Luke Jerram Aeolus allows viewers to experience the changes in the wind. The title of the work comes from Greeky mythology and means the ruler of the four winds. As the artist describes the work,

The sculpture a giant aeolian harp, designed to resonate and sing with the wind without any electrical power or amplification. Vibrations in strings attached to some of the tubes are transferred through skins covering the tops, and projected down through the tubes towards the viewer standing beneath the arch. For those tubes without strings attached, the tubes are tuned to an aeolian scale and hum at a series of low frequencies even when its not windy.

You can listen to the artwork below:

For more information on Jerram’s works, click here. 

- Lee Jones

p.s.! Aeolus is now up for auction with a starting bid of just £1 plus the costs of delivery and installation. Individuals, businesses, organizations and institutions from around the world can participate in this sealed bid auction. The deadline for your sealed bids is 1st July 2013. Click here for more information.

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
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