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George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 
To most people, numbers on a page and mathematic equations can evoke anxiety and headache or induce calmness and comfort. To very few, however, do algorithms and geometry equate to a detailed and beautiful beginning to art. George Thomson is a 23 year-old student from the United Kingdom who takes great pride and spends countless hours producing art from numbers, or fractal art. George says that for him the images produced by the numerous calculations required represent the beauty and wonders of the universe.
Due to the size produced, the fractal art pieces he creates are perfect for replication as canvas prints. Each piece, as unique as the universe in which it reflects, Thomson says one image can take about 72 hours to produce. The millions of calculations result in peaceful, yet stimulating images, which produce a final picture similar to that of a nebula or what you might see when peering down through a microscope. Thomson’s computer generated fractal art pieces are being shared and sold by him for the first time ever. Each fractal art piece is its own story of uniqueness, color, and light, produced by geometric patterns and shapes.
Visit the Kickstarter page for George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 Project.
- Lee Jones
George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 
To most people, numbers on a page and mathematic equations can evoke anxiety and headache or induce calmness and comfort. To very few, however, do algorithms and geometry equate to a detailed and beautiful beginning to art. George Thomson is a 23 year-old student from the United Kingdom who takes great pride and spends countless hours producing art from numbers, or fractal art. George says that for him the images produced by the numerous calculations required represent the beauty and wonders of the universe.
Due to the size produced, the fractal art pieces he creates are perfect for replication as canvas prints. Each piece, as unique as the universe in which it reflects, Thomson says one image can take about 72 hours to produce. The millions of calculations result in peaceful, yet stimulating images, which produce a final picture similar to that of a nebula or what you might see when peering down through a microscope. Thomson’s computer generated fractal art pieces are being shared and sold by him for the first time ever. Each fractal art piece is its own story of uniqueness, color, and light, produced by geometric patterns and shapes.
Visit the Kickstarter page for George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 Project.
- Lee Jones
George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 
To most people, numbers on a page and mathematic equations can evoke anxiety and headache or induce calmness and comfort. To very few, however, do algorithms and geometry equate to a detailed and beautiful beginning to art. George Thomson is a 23 year-old student from the United Kingdom who takes great pride and spends countless hours producing art from numbers, or fractal art. George says that for him the images produced by the numerous calculations required represent the beauty and wonders of the universe.
Due to the size produced, the fractal art pieces he creates are perfect for replication as canvas prints. Each piece, as unique as the universe in which it reflects, Thomson says one image can take about 72 hours to produce. The millions of calculations result in peaceful, yet stimulating images, which produce a final picture similar to that of a nebula or what you might see when peering down through a microscope. Thomson’s computer generated fractal art pieces are being shared and sold by him for the first time ever. Each fractal art piece is its own story of uniqueness, color, and light, produced by geometric patterns and shapes.
Visit the Kickstarter page for George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 Project.
- Lee Jones
George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 
To most people, numbers on a page and mathematic equations can evoke anxiety and headache or induce calmness and comfort. To very few, however, do algorithms and geometry equate to a detailed and beautiful beginning to art. George Thomson is a 23 year-old student from the United Kingdom who takes great pride and spends countless hours producing art from numbers, or fractal art. George says that for him the images produced by the numerous calculations required represent the beauty and wonders of the universe.
Due to the size produced, the fractal art pieces he creates are perfect for replication as canvas prints. Each piece, as unique as the universe in which it reflects, Thomson says one image can take about 72 hours to produce. The millions of calculations result in peaceful, yet stimulating images, which produce a final picture similar to that of a nebula or what you might see when peering down through a microscope. Thomson’s computer generated fractal art pieces are being shared and sold by him for the first time ever. Each fractal art piece is its own story of uniqueness, color, and light, produced by geometric patterns and shapes.
Visit the Kickstarter page for George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 Project.
- Lee Jones
George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 
To most people, numbers on a page and mathematic equations can evoke anxiety and headache or induce calmness and comfort. To very few, however, do algorithms and geometry equate to a detailed and beautiful beginning to art. George Thomson is a 23 year-old student from the United Kingdom who takes great pride and spends countless hours producing art from numbers, or fractal art. George says that for him the images produced by the numerous calculations required represent the beauty and wonders of the universe.
Due to the size produced, the fractal art pieces he creates are perfect for replication as canvas prints. Each piece, as unique as the universe in which it reflects, Thomson says one image can take about 72 hours to produce. The millions of calculations result in peaceful, yet stimulating images, which produce a final picture similar to that of a nebula or what you might see when peering down through a microscope. Thomson’s computer generated fractal art pieces are being shared and sold by him for the first time ever. Each fractal art piece is its own story of uniqueness, color, and light, produced by geometric patterns and shapes.
Visit the Kickstarter page for George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 Project.
- Lee Jones

George Thomson’s Fractal Art


To most people, numbers on a page and mathematic equations can evoke anxiety and headache or induce calmness and comfort. To very few, however, do algorithms and geometry equate to a detailed and beautiful beginning to art. George Thomson is a 23 year-old student from the United Kingdom who takes great pride and spends countless hours producing art from numbers, or fractal art. George says that for him the images produced by the numerous calculations required represent the beauty and wonders of the universe.

Due to the size produced, the fractal art pieces he creates are perfect for replication as canvas prints. Each piece, as unique as the universe in which it reflects, Thomson says one image can take about 72 hours to produce. The millions of calculations result in peaceful, yet stimulating images, which produce a final picture similar to that of a nebula or what you might see when peering down through a microscope. Thomson’s computer generated fractal art pieces are being shared and sold by him for the first time ever. Each fractal art piece is its own story of uniqueness, color, and light, produced by geometric patterns and shapes.

Visit the Kickstarter page for George Thomson’s Fractal Art
 Project.

- Lee Jones

5 Photos
/ art math fractal george thomson fractal art kickstarter
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Zachary Norman
These images may look like 3D objects but Zachary Norman, a MFA Candidate in Photography at Indiana University, creates these illusionistic geometric forms through his use of photography. As Norman describes his process,
Each image was constructed using only two anamorphic sheets of (flat) inkjet paper, a roll of green seamless paper, a set of lights and a camera. The apparent three-dimensionality of each form is an illusion achieved through anamorphism and multiple strobes flashes (exposures) all executed “in-camera”. The colors of the forms are the result of middle mixtures achieved through multiple exposures. The colors were determined by a strict formula- the color spectrum was quantified, using the hexadecimal format, and then divided by the number of faces of a given Platonic Solid, each face was then assigned a fraction of the color spectrum. For example, an octahedron has eight sides so the spectrum was divided into eight equal fractions and each face of the octahedron was assigned one of these colors.
For more information on Norman’s work, visit his website here, or his tumblr blog here. 
- Lee Jones
Powers of Ten
Powers of Ten is a seminal documentary film produced in 1977 by Charles and Ray Eames, better known in their lifetimes as boundary-pushing designers and architects. It attempts to do visually what exponents do mathematically: that is, render intelligible the unfathomably vast and the infinitely small. Beginning at a lakeside picnic, the camera pans out to the edge of the observable universe before diving into the human body, passing through an individual cell to the vibrations of its component carbon atoms. The film itself has aged surprisingly well, and its central premise—making the microcosm and macrocosm both relative and relevant to the human scale—hasn’t aged at all. You can watch it and further explore each order of magnitude here.
- Alex Tesar
Powers of Ten
Powers of Ten is a seminal documentary film produced in 1977 by Charles and Ray Eames, better known in their lifetimes as boundary-pushing designers and architects. It attempts to do visually what exponents do mathematically: that is, render intelligible the unfathomably vast and the infinitely small. Beginning at a lakeside picnic, the camera pans out to the edge of the observable universe before diving into the human body, passing through an individual cell to the vibrations of its component carbon atoms. The film itself has aged surprisingly well, and its central premise—making the microcosm and macrocosm both relative and relevant to the human scale—hasn’t aged at all. You can watch it and further explore each order of magnitude here.
- Alex Tesar
Powers of Ten
Powers of Ten is a seminal documentary film produced in 1977 by Charles and Ray Eames, better known in their lifetimes as boundary-pushing designers and architects. It attempts to do visually what exponents do mathematically: that is, render intelligible the unfathomably vast and the infinitely small. Beginning at a lakeside picnic, the camera pans out to the edge of the observable universe before diving into the human body, passing through an individual cell to the vibrations of its component carbon atoms. The film itself has aged surprisingly well, and its central premise—making the microcosm and macrocosm both relative and relevant to the human scale—hasn’t aged at all. You can watch it and further explore each order of magnitude here.
- Alex Tesar
Powers of Ten
Powers of Ten is a seminal documentary film produced in 1977 by Charles and Ray Eames, better known in their lifetimes as boundary-pushing designers and architects. It attempts to do visually what exponents do mathematically: that is, render intelligible the unfathomably vast and the infinitely small. Beginning at a lakeside picnic, the camera pans out to the edge of the observable universe before diving into the human body, passing through an individual cell to the vibrations of its component carbon atoms. The film itself has aged surprisingly well, and its central premise—making the microcosm and macrocosm both relative and relevant to the human scale—hasn’t aged at all. You can watch it and further explore each order of magnitude here.
- Alex Tesar
Nikki Graziano
"Nevertheless, the fact is that there is nothing as dreamy and poetic, nothing as radical, subversive, and psychedelic, as mathematics. It is every bit as mind blowing as cosmology or physics… and allows more freedom of expression than poetry, art, or music… Mathematics is the purest of the arts, as well as the most misunderstood."(Paul Lockhart via Nikki Graziano)
In this series titled Found Functions, New York photographer Nikki Graziano superimposes graphically-rendered functions on photos of objects and spaces in nature. The images are elegant, poetic reminders of the inextricable relationship between the natural beauty we see every day and the conceptual possibilities of math and science. While art bears a kind of mathematical skeleton, mathematics reveals its artistic applications.
See more of Graziano’s work at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Nikki Graziano
"Nevertheless, the fact is that there is nothing as dreamy and poetic, nothing as radical, subversive, and psychedelic, as mathematics. It is every bit as mind blowing as cosmology or physics… and allows more freedom of expression than poetry, art, or music… Mathematics is the purest of the arts, as well as the most misunderstood."(Paul Lockhart via Nikki Graziano)
In this series titled Found Functions, New York photographer Nikki Graziano superimposes graphically-rendered functions on photos of objects and spaces in nature. The images are elegant, poetic reminders of the inextricable relationship between the natural beauty we see every day and the conceptual possibilities of math and science. While art bears a kind of mathematical skeleton, mathematics reveals its artistic applications.
See more of Graziano’s work at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Nikki Graziano
"Nevertheless, the fact is that there is nothing as dreamy and poetic, nothing as radical, subversive, and psychedelic, as mathematics. It is every bit as mind blowing as cosmology or physics… and allows more freedom of expression than poetry, art, or music… Mathematics is the purest of the arts, as well as the most misunderstood."(Paul Lockhart via Nikki Graziano)
In this series titled Found Functions, New York photographer Nikki Graziano superimposes graphically-rendered functions on photos of objects and spaces in nature. The images are elegant, poetic reminders of the inextricable relationship between the natural beauty we see every day and the conceptual possibilities of math and science. While art bears a kind of mathematical skeleton, mathematics reveals its artistic applications.
See more of Graziano’s work at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Nikki Graziano
"Nevertheless, the fact is that there is nothing as dreamy and poetic, nothing as radical, subversive, and psychedelic, as mathematics. It is every bit as mind blowing as cosmology or physics… and allows more freedom of expression than poetry, art, or music… Mathematics is the purest of the arts, as well as the most misunderstood."(Paul Lockhart via Nikki Graziano)
In this series titled Found Functions, New York photographer Nikki Graziano superimposes graphically-rendered functions on photos of objects and spaces in nature. The images are elegant, poetic reminders of the inextricable relationship between the natural beauty we see every day and the conceptual possibilities of math and science. While art bears a kind of mathematical skeleton, mathematics reveals its artistic applications.
See more of Graziano’s work at her website here.
- Erin Saunders

Nikki Graziano

"Nevertheless, the fact is that there is nothing as dreamy and poetic, nothing as radical, subversive, and psychedelic, as mathematics. It is every bit as mind blowing as cosmology or physics… and allows more freedom of expression than poetry, art, or music… Mathematics is the purest of the arts, as well as the most misunderstood."(Paul Lockhart via Nikki Graziano)

In this series titled Found Functions, New York photographer Nikki Graziano superimposes graphically-rendered functions on photos of objects and spaces in nature. The images are elegant, poetic reminders of the inextricable relationship between the natural beauty we see every day and the conceptual possibilities of math and science. While art bears a kind of mathematical skeleton, mathematics reveals its artistic applications.

See more of Graziano’s work at her website here.

- Erin Saunders

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art science math functions nikki graziano photography nature
Marian Lorenz and Allan Moose
Taken from a 1986 volume of Antic Magazine, the Artistic Mathematics Program developed by educators Marian Lorenz and Allan Moose used arithmetic functions as inputs to manipulate early Atari computer displays. The sine function — “ideal for generating many interesting and attractive curves” — offers virtually limitless possibilities as experimenting with variables begins to alter the output. The resulting colourful, pixellated graphics certainly reflect the “8-bit aesthetic” of the 1980s that continue to inspire graphic explorations in art, design, and fashion today.
Read up on the details of this project and others from the Antic Archives here, and check out The Evolution of 8-bit Art.
- Erin Saunders
Marian Lorenz and Allan Moose
Taken from a 1986 volume of Antic Magazine, the Artistic Mathematics Program developed by educators Marian Lorenz and Allan Moose used arithmetic functions as inputs to manipulate early Atari computer displays. The sine function — “ideal for generating many interesting and attractive curves” — offers virtually limitless possibilities as experimenting with variables begins to alter the output. The resulting colourful, pixellated graphics certainly reflect the “8-bit aesthetic” of the 1980s that continue to inspire graphic explorations in art, design, and fashion today.
Read up on the details of this project and others from the Antic Archives here, and check out The Evolution of 8-bit Art.
- Erin Saunders
The James Stewart Centre for Mathematics
I recently came across images of the 2003 renovation of the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics at McMaster University in Hamilton. On the outside, the building looks like a typical Hogwarts-like castle, but on the inside it’s really something different. As Garth Zimmer, a member of the design team, describes the project,
“The objective was to strengthen the identity of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and to create a facility that recognizes the interactive nature of mathematics with spaces that promote team-based study and research. The design concept imposed a highly modern interior onto the historic Collegiate Gothic exterior. The interior demolition revealed the concrete post-and-beam construction. A new insulated envelope was inserted to preserve the original stone cladding of the exterior wall and the windows. Portions of the floor slabs were removed to create “the void”, which, articulated in blue glass, visually connects the building’s four storeys. Skylit openings at its east and west end allow natural light to be drawn deep into the interior spaces.”
This renovation gives a sense of identity to the building and faculty. The many chalkboards demonstrate Math’s creativity and the glass environment creates a sense of awe. What a beautiful and inspiring building! For more information, click here. 
- Lee Jones
The James Stewart Centre for Mathematics
I recently came across images of the 2003 renovation of the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics at McMaster University in Hamilton. On the outside, the building looks like a typical Hogwarts-like castle, but on the inside it’s really something different. As Garth Zimmer, a member of the design team, describes the project,
“The objective was to strengthen the identity of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and to create a facility that recognizes the interactive nature of mathematics with spaces that promote team-based study and research. The design concept imposed a highly modern interior onto the historic Collegiate Gothic exterior. The interior demolition revealed the concrete post-and-beam construction. A new insulated envelope was inserted to preserve the original stone cladding of the exterior wall and the windows. Portions of the floor slabs were removed to create “the void”, which, articulated in blue glass, visually connects the building’s four storeys. Skylit openings at its east and west end allow natural light to be drawn deep into the interior spaces.”
This renovation gives a sense of identity to the building and faculty. The many chalkboards demonstrate Math’s creativity and the glass environment creates a sense of awe. What a beautiful and inspiring building! For more information, click here. 
- Lee Jones
The James Stewart Centre for Mathematics
I recently came across images of the 2003 renovation of the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics at McMaster University in Hamilton. On the outside, the building looks like a typical Hogwarts-like castle, but on the inside it’s really something different. As Garth Zimmer, a member of the design team, describes the project,
“The objective was to strengthen the identity of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and to create a facility that recognizes the interactive nature of mathematics with spaces that promote team-based study and research. The design concept imposed a highly modern interior onto the historic Collegiate Gothic exterior. The interior demolition revealed the concrete post-and-beam construction. A new insulated envelope was inserted to preserve the original stone cladding of the exterior wall and the windows. Portions of the floor slabs were removed to create “the void”, which, articulated in blue glass, visually connects the building’s four storeys. Skylit openings at its east and west end allow natural light to be drawn deep into the interior spaces.”
This renovation gives a sense of identity to the building and faculty. The many chalkboards demonstrate Math’s creativity and the glass environment creates a sense of awe. What a beautiful and inspiring building! For more information, click here. 
- Lee Jones
The James Stewart Centre for Mathematics
I recently came across images of the 2003 renovation of the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics at McMaster University in Hamilton. On the outside, the building looks like a typical Hogwarts-like castle, but on the inside it’s really something different. As Garth Zimmer, a member of the design team, describes the project,
“The objective was to strengthen the identity of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and to create a facility that recognizes the interactive nature of mathematics with spaces that promote team-based study and research. The design concept imposed a highly modern interior onto the historic Collegiate Gothic exterior. The interior demolition revealed the concrete post-and-beam construction. A new insulated envelope was inserted to preserve the original stone cladding of the exterior wall and the windows. Portions of the floor slabs were removed to create “the void”, which, articulated in blue glass, visually connects the building’s four storeys. Skylit openings at its east and west end allow natural light to be drawn deep into the interior spaces.”
This renovation gives a sense of identity to the building and faculty. The many chalkboards demonstrate Math’s creativity and the glass environment creates a sense of awe. What a beautiful and inspiring building! For more information, click here. 
- Lee Jones
The James Stewart Centre for Mathematics
I recently came across images of the 2003 renovation of the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics at McMaster University in Hamilton. On the outside, the building looks like a typical Hogwarts-like castle, but on the inside it’s really something different. As Garth Zimmer, a member of the design team, describes the project,
“The objective was to strengthen the identity of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and to create a facility that recognizes the interactive nature of mathematics with spaces that promote team-based study and research. The design concept imposed a highly modern interior onto the historic Collegiate Gothic exterior. The interior demolition revealed the concrete post-and-beam construction. A new insulated envelope was inserted to preserve the original stone cladding of the exterior wall and the windows. Portions of the floor slabs were removed to create “the void”, which, articulated in blue glass, visually connects the building’s four storeys. Skylit openings at its east and west end allow natural light to be drawn deep into the interior spaces.”
This renovation gives a sense of identity to the building and faculty. The many chalkboards demonstrate Math’s creativity and the glass environment creates a sense of awe. What a beautiful and inspiring building! For more information, click here. 
- Lee Jones

The James Stewart Centre for Mathematics

I recently came across images of the 2003 renovation of the James Stewart Centre for Mathematics at McMaster University in Hamilton. On the outside, the building looks like a typical Hogwarts-like castle, but on the inside it’s really something different. As Garth Zimmer, a member of the design team, describes the project,

The objective was to strengthen the identity of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and to create a facility that recognizes the interactive nature of mathematics with spaces that promote team-based study and research. The design concept imposed a highly modern interior onto the historic Collegiate Gothic exterior. The interior demolition revealed the concrete post-and-beam construction. A new insulated envelope was inserted to preserve the original stone cladding of the exterior wall and the windows. Portions of the floor slabs were removed to create “the void”, which, articulated in blue glass, visually connects the building’s four storeys. Skylit openings at its east and west end allow natural light to be drawn deep into the interior spaces.”

This renovation gives a sense of identity to the building and faculty. The many chalkboards demonstrate Math’s creativity and the glass environment creates a sense of awe. What a beautiful and inspiring building! For more information, click here. 

- Lee Jones

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ art science math architecture McMaster University Hamilton lee jones
Complexity Graphics
Tatiana Plakhova, also known as Complexity Graphics, is a digital illustrator based in Moscow. Her projects are complicated, highly-detailed diagrams of data sets or other non-graphic information. With project titles like “Music is Math,” “The End of Geography,” and “Visual Science,” Plakhova’s images clearly seek to bridge the divide between the visual arts and the often invisible worlds of math, science, and music.
See more of Plakhova’s works at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Complexity Graphics
Tatiana Plakhova, also known as Complexity Graphics, is a digital illustrator based in Moscow. Her projects are complicated, highly-detailed diagrams of data sets or other non-graphic information. With project titles like “Music is Math,” “The End of Geography,” and “Visual Science,” Plakhova’s images clearly seek to bridge the divide between the visual arts and the often invisible worlds of math, science, and music.
See more of Plakhova’s works at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Complexity Graphics
Tatiana Plakhova, also known as Complexity Graphics, is a digital illustrator based in Moscow. Her projects are complicated, highly-detailed diagrams of data sets or other non-graphic information. With project titles like “Music is Math,” “The End of Geography,” and “Visual Science,” Plakhova’s images clearly seek to bridge the divide between the visual arts and the often invisible worlds of math, science, and music.
See more of Plakhova’s works at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Complexity Graphics
Tatiana Plakhova, also known as Complexity Graphics, is a digital illustrator based in Moscow. Her projects are complicated, highly-detailed diagrams of data sets or other non-graphic information. With project titles like “Music is Math,” “The End of Geography,” and “Visual Science,” Plakhova’s images clearly seek to bridge the divide between the visual arts and the often invisible worlds of math, science, and music.
See more of Plakhova’s works at her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Kyuha Shim’s Isomorphic Geometry in Geo Maps
(i·so·mor·phism n.(mathematics):  one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two sets such that the result of an operation on elements of one set corresponds to the result of the analogous operation on their images in the other set.)
Artist and designer Kyuha Shim’s Geo Maps project explores the mathematical principles at work in the art of paper folding. Visitors to the installation are invited to interact with a small, folded paper sculpture; as he or she rotates the object, an interactive projection plays over a larger, corresponding sculpture of the same shape according to the movements of its “partner.” Geo Map is in this way a study of mathematical complexity through simple forms. But while the projections recall the cool, clean aesthetic of minimalism, the project is in part a response to the losses incurred by the increasing dominance of digital design programs. The artist writes:
"Computer graphics enable designers to generate fascinating outcomes in a very short period, but we are losing the specificity and precision of older generation designers working in traditional media. Through this experience, I learned how to merge traditional and digital mediums using projection mapping, which connected users’ behaviors with the paper installation."
See many more projects by Kyuha Shim here. 
- Erin Saunders
Kyuha Shim’s Isomorphic Geometry in Geo Maps
(i·so·mor·phism n.(mathematics):  one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two sets such that the result of an operation on elements of one set corresponds to the result of the analogous operation on their images in the other set.)
Artist and designer Kyuha Shim’s Geo Maps project explores the mathematical principles at work in the art of paper folding. Visitors to the installation are invited to interact with a small, folded paper sculpture; as he or she rotates the object, an interactive projection plays over a larger, corresponding sculpture of the same shape according to the movements of its “partner.” Geo Map is in this way a study of mathematical complexity through simple forms. But while the projections recall the cool, clean aesthetic of minimalism, the project is in part a response to the losses incurred by the increasing dominance of digital design programs. The artist writes:
"Computer graphics enable designers to generate fascinating outcomes in a very short period, but we are losing the specificity and precision of older generation designers working in traditional media. Through this experience, I learned how to merge traditional and digital mediums using projection mapping, which connected users’ behaviors with the paper installation."
See many more projects by Kyuha Shim here. 
- Erin Saunders
Kyuha Shim’s Isomorphic Geometry in Geo Maps
(i·so·mor·phism n.(mathematics):  one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two sets such that the result of an operation on elements of one set corresponds to the result of the analogous operation on their images in the other set.)
Artist and designer Kyuha Shim’s Geo Maps project explores the mathematical principles at work in the art of paper folding. Visitors to the installation are invited to interact with a small, folded paper sculpture; as he or she rotates the object, an interactive projection plays over a larger, corresponding sculpture of the same shape according to the movements of its “partner.” Geo Map is in this way a study of mathematical complexity through simple forms. But while the projections recall the cool, clean aesthetic of minimalism, the project is in part a response to the losses incurred by the increasing dominance of digital design programs. The artist writes:
"Computer graphics enable designers to generate fascinating outcomes in a very short period, but we are losing the specificity and precision of older generation designers working in traditional media. Through this experience, I learned how to merge traditional and digital mediums using projection mapping, which connected users’ behaviors with the paper installation."
See many more projects by Kyuha Shim here. 
- Erin Saunders
Kyuha Shim’s Isomorphic Geometry in Geo Maps
(i·so·mor·phism n.(mathematics):  one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two sets such that the result of an operation on elements of one set corresponds to the result of the analogous operation on their images in the other set.)
Artist and designer Kyuha Shim’s Geo Maps project explores the mathematical principles at work in the art of paper folding. Visitors to the installation are invited to interact with a small, folded paper sculpture; as he or she rotates the object, an interactive projection plays over a larger, corresponding sculpture of the same shape according to the movements of its “partner.” Geo Map is in this way a study of mathematical complexity through simple forms. But while the projections recall the cool, clean aesthetic of minimalism, the project is in part a response to the losses incurred by the increasing dominance of digital design programs. The artist writes:
"Computer graphics enable designers to generate fascinating outcomes in a very short period, but we are losing the specificity and precision of older generation designers working in traditional media. Through this experience, I learned how to merge traditional and digital mediums using projection mapping, which connected users’ behaviors with the paper installation."
See many more projects by Kyuha Shim here. 
- Erin Saunders

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