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On the Farm, Under the Microscope
Microscopic images can tell us a lot about organisms too small to observe with the naked eye, but studying these organisms does not give us a true image of their form, as lenses and lighting can distort certain elements. Artist Carina Profir focuses on this alteration of specimen by emulating the mechanisms and process of the microscopy in her series On the Farm (2013).
The artist tackles the issue of altered image by photographing livestock, mimicking the microscopic ‘point-of-view’, and stitching together photographs to create an organic flow of multiple specimens. Livestock are very important to studies in microbiology. Most notably, in 1937, veterinarian Max Sterne created a vaccine for live spore anthrax among livestock, which greatly lowered the risk of humans inhaling the bacteria. The photo compositions of Profir are themselves a direct references to slides taken of the Bacillus anthracis microbe. 

By seeing the cows and sheep in a new perspective, it alters our perception of depth and size. The artist herself states, that the work provides a “glimpse into scientific imaging and the expansive duality of scientific truth and fiction”. One can begin to wonder how true microscopic organisms might actually look, without the distortions provided by microscopes. 
-Anna Paluch
On the Farm, Under the Microscope
Microscopic images can tell us a lot about organisms too small to observe with the naked eye, but studying these organisms does not give us a true image of their form, as lenses and lighting can distort certain elements. Artist Carina Profir focuses on this alteration of specimen by emulating the mechanisms and process of the microscopy in her series On the Farm (2013).
The artist tackles the issue of altered image by photographing livestock, mimicking the microscopic ‘point-of-view’, and stitching together photographs to create an organic flow of multiple specimens. Livestock are very important to studies in microbiology. Most notably, in 1937, veterinarian Max Sterne created a vaccine for live spore anthrax among livestock, which greatly lowered the risk of humans inhaling the bacteria. The photo compositions of Profir are themselves a direct references to slides taken of the Bacillus anthracis microbe. 

By seeing the cows and sheep in a new perspective, it alters our perception of depth and size. The artist herself states, that the work provides a “glimpse into scientific imaging and the expansive duality of scientific truth and fiction”. One can begin to wonder how true microscopic organisms might actually look, without the distortions provided by microscopes. 
-Anna Paluch
On the Farm, Under the Microscope
Microscopic images can tell us a lot about organisms too small to observe with the naked eye, but studying these organisms does not give us a true image of their form, as lenses and lighting can distort certain elements. Artist Carina Profir focuses on this alteration of specimen by emulating the mechanisms and process of the microscopy in her series On the Farm (2013).
The artist tackles the issue of altered image by photographing livestock, mimicking the microscopic ‘point-of-view’, and stitching together photographs to create an organic flow of multiple specimens. Livestock are very important to studies in microbiology. Most notably, in 1937, veterinarian Max Sterne created a vaccine for live spore anthrax among livestock, which greatly lowered the risk of humans inhaling the bacteria. The photo compositions of Profir are themselves a direct references to slides taken of the Bacillus anthracis microbe. 

By seeing the cows and sheep in a new perspective, it alters our perception of depth and size. The artist herself states, that the work provides a “glimpse into scientific imaging and the expansive duality of scientific truth and fiction”. One can begin to wonder how true microscopic organisms might actually look, without the distortions provided by microscopes. 
-Anna Paluch
On the Farm, Under the Microscope
Microscopic images can tell us a lot about organisms too small to observe with the naked eye, but studying these organisms does not give us a true image of their form, as lenses and lighting can distort certain elements. Artist Carina Profir focuses on this alteration of specimen by emulating the mechanisms and process of the microscopy in her series On the Farm (2013).
The artist tackles the issue of altered image by photographing livestock, mimicking the microscopic ‘point-of-view’, and stitching together photographs to create an organic flow of multiple specimens. Livestock are very important to studies in microbiology. Most notably, in 1937, veterinarian Max Sterne created a vaccine for live spore anthrax among livestock, which greatly lowered the risk of humans inhaling the bacteria. The photo compositions of Profir are themselves a direct references to slides taken of the Bacillus anthracis microbe. 

By seeing the cows and sheep in a new perspective, it alters our perception of depth and size. The artist herself states, that the work provides a “glimpse into scientific imaging and the expansive duality of scientific truth and fiction”. One can begin to wonder how true microscopic organisms might actually look, without the distortions provided by microscopes. 
-Anna Paluch

On the Farm, Under the Microscope

Microscopic images can tell us a lot about organisms too small to observe with the naked eye, but studying these organisms does not give us a true image of their form, as lenses and lighting can distort certain elements. Artist Carina Profir focuses on this alteration of specimen by emulating the mechanisms and process of the microscopy in her series On the Farm (2013).

The artist tackles the issue of altered image by photographing livestock, mimicking the microscopic ‘point-of-view’, and stitching together photographs to create an organic flow of multiple specimens. Livestock are very important to studies in microbiology. Most notably, in 1937, veterinarian Max Sterne created a vaccine for live spore anthrax among livestock, which greatly lowered the risk of humans inhaling the bacteria. The photo compositions of Profir are themselves a direct references to slides taken of the Bacillus anthracis microbe.

By seeing the cows and sheep in a new perspective, it alters our perception of depth and size. The artist herself states, that the work provides a “glimpse into scientific imaging and the expansive duality of scientific truth and fiction”. One can begin to wonder how true microscopic organisms might actually look, without the distortions provided by microscopes. 

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ Carina Profir anna paluch Microscopy microbiology microscopic photography bacillus anthracis livestock Max Sterne Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Ottawa School of Art ottawa art scene ottawa art ottawa artists art science art and science journal farm
Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography
Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.
Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions. 
Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.
Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch
Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography
Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.
Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions. 
Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.
Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch
Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography
Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.
Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions. 
Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.
Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch

Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography

Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.

Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions.

Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.

Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ photomicrography cells science biology Microscopy microbiology nuclei photography Dr. Paul Appleton Claudia Buttera Nikola Rahme anna paluch art art and science journal
Mineral Microscopy
Stephanie Bateman-Graham does mineral microscopy, or as she prefers to call it “using a low-powered digital toy microscope to take pictures of beautiful minerals”. In these works Bateman-Graham discovers the parts of nature that are weirdly similar to recognizable art styles — from Van Gogh impressionism to the fractured lines of Picasso. I’ve included her descriptions of the three works above:
Ecosystem (Moss Agate):  Do you see a mixed population of microbes living together in a complete ecosystem? Actually it’s a microscope view of the mineral Stringy Moss Agate from Lake Bonneville. The material is translucent which gives a watery feel to the image, but it is entirely solid crystal.
Heart of Stony Glass (Opalite): Microscope view of the Australian mineral Rosella Opalite. The light bounces around this veined and fractured crystalline material to reveal a heart and vascular system inside the stone. The amazing brushstrokes and textures in this image are all natural.
Fire Mountain (Lace Agate): A mountain burns in this microscope view of the mineral Laguna Lace Agate from Mexico. Also known as Crazy Lace Agate.
To see more of Bateman-Graham’s works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mineral Microscopy
Stephanie Bateman-Graham does mineral microscopy, or as she prefers to call it “using a low-powered digital toy microscope to take pictures of beautiful minerals”. In these works Bateman-Graham discovers the parts of nature that are weirdly similar to recognizable art styles — from Van Gogh impressionism to the fractured lines of Picasso. I’ve included her descriptions of the three works above:
Ecosystem (Moss Agate):  Do you see a mixed population of microbes living together in a complete ecosystem? Actually it’s a microscope view of the mineral Stringy Moss Agate from Lake Bonneville. The material is translucent which gives a watery feel to the image, but it is entirely solid crystal.
Heart of Stony Glass (Opalite): Microscope view of the Australian mineral Rosella Opalite. The light bounces around this veined and fractured crystalline material to reveal a heart and vascular system inside the stone. The amazing brushstrokes and textures in this image are all natural.
Fire Mountain (Lace Agate): A mountain burns in this microscope view of the mineral Laguna Lace Agate from Mexico. Also known as Crazy Lace Agate.
To see more of Bateman-Graham’s works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Mineral Microscopy
Stephanie Bateman-Graham does mineral microscopy, or as she prefers to call it “using a low-powered digital toy microscope to take pictures of beautiful minerals”. In these works Bateman-Graham discovers the parts of nature that are weirdly similar to recognizable art styles — from Van Gogh impressionism to the fractured lines of Picasso. I’ve included her descriptions of the three works above:
Ecosystem (Moss Agate):  Do you see a mixed population of microbes living together in a complete ecosystem? Actually it’s a microscope view of the mineral Stringy Moss Agate from Lake Bonneville. The material is translucent which gives a watery feel to the image, but it is entirely solid crystal.
Heart of Stony Glass (Opalite): Microscope view of the Australian mineral Rosella Opalite. The light bounces around this veined and fractured crystalline material to reveal a heart and vascular system inside the stone. The amazing brushstrokes and textures in this image are all natural.
Fire Mountain (Lace Agate): A mountain burns in this microscope view of the mineral Laguna Lace Agate from Mexico. Also known as Crazy Lace Agate.
To see more of Bateman-Graham’s works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
The Illusion of Reality
In 1999, a movie came out which blew everyone’s mind, and still twists our brains today : the Matrix. It described a future where reality is an illusion, a computer-simulated universe in which we thrive. Solipsism with guns in a post-apocalyptic world. But what if I told you… they’re right ? In fact that’s not true, they’re probably completely mistaken. Reality is not a computer-generated dream. Reality is empty. Well… 99,99% empty.
Science basics, matter is made of atoms. Atoms are themselves made of a cloud of electrons orbiting a dense nucleus of protons and neutrons. Separating electrons and the nucleus is just air. Not even air, since air is composed of molecules. This is why I can say that atoms are mostly empty, and therefore matter is mostly empty. We’ve known this for a very long time. Most of us would just give up and say “matter is nothing, so why bother ?”. Most of us, but not scientists. Scientists have twisted and mangled these teensy balls of nothing. They stripped these minuscule objects apart and threw the remains into a 27 kilometers collider to blow them up. They’ve invented machines and probes to witness matter in its very extreme intimacy. In 1951 they invented the Field Ion Microscope and they’ve taken pictures… of individual atoms. Repelled ions looking like clusters of stars or ripples into the nothingness.
So, why bother ? That’s why. Matter is almost empty. But we were here, and we took pictures to prove it.
Picture : Examples of field ion micrographs of (a) iridium, (b) a Pd40Ni40P20 bulk metallic glass, (c) a decorated grain boundary in a neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steel, and (d) 5nm-diameter secondary precipitates in the nickel-based superalloy Alloy 718
M.K. Miller (2000) The Development of Atom Probe Field-Ion Microscopy, Materials Characterization (44):1-2 11-27
- Agathe of Frontal Cortex

The Illusion of Reality

In 1999, a movie came out which blew everyone’s mind, and still twists our brains today : the Matrix. It described a future where reality is an illusion, a computer-simulated universe in which we thrive. Solipsism with guns in a post-apocalyptic world. But what if I told you… they’re right ? In fact that’s not true, they’re probably completely mistaken. Reality is not a computer-generated dream. Reality is empty. Well… 99,99% empty.

Science basics, matter is made of atoms. Atoms are themselves made of a cloud of electrons orbiting a dense nucleus of protons and neutrons. Separating electrons and the nucleus is just air. Not even air, since air is composed of molecules. This is why I can say that atoms are mostly empty, and therefore matter is mostly empty. We’ve known this for a very long time. Most of us would just give up and say “matter is nothing, so why bother ?”. Most of us, but not scientists. Scientists have twisted and mangled these teensy balls of nothing. They stripped these minuscule objects apart and threw the remains into a 27 kilometers collider to blow them up. They’ve invented machines and probes to witness matter in its very extreme intimacy. In 1951 they invented the Field Ion Microscope and they’ve taken pictures… of individual atoms. Repelled ions looking like clusters of stars or ripples into the nothingness.

So, why bother ? That’s why. Matter is almost empty. But we were here, and we took pictures to prove it.

Picture : Examples of field ion micrographs of (a) iridium, (b) a Pd40Ni40P20 bulk metallic glass, (c) a decorated grain boundary in a neutron-irradiated pressure vessel steel, and (d) 5nm-diameter secondary precipitates in the nickel-based superalloy Alloy 718

M.K. Miller (2000) The Development of Atom Probe Field-Ion Microscopy, Materials Characterization (44):1-2 11-27

Agathe of Frontal Cortex

science microscopy field ion microscopy history Frontal Cortex scientist in residence
Life Inside a Cell
Another week, another type of microscopy. Did you notice how much I like microscopy yet ? Even though, in biology, we have to rely on two major fields, imaging and molecular science. There are things you can’t comprehend in microscopy, just like there are things you can’t see in molecular biology. These are two sides of the exact same coin, and one must juggle between both to try and get some kind of understanding of what’s happening inside the cell. With microscopy, it’s easy to understand why it’s not perfect, why it unfortunately doesn’t hold all the answers. Most of the time, we’ve fixed an instant in time, the cell was living one moment, and was dead the next, stuck forever in what it was doing at the time. Looking into the objective, you can only see what was happening then. And even when doing microscopy on living cells, we mostly have to rely on specific markers, so all of what’s going on around is invisible. Unknown. And that’s without saying that a picture is just that, a picture, and sometimes you’re just baffled by what’s on the screen, just like when you see some abstract piece of art and think “What is this and why in the world is it worth $150,000 ?”
So we might develop wonderful technologies and extravagant techniques, just like the electron microscopy on “unroofed” cells you’re seeing here, we may well go further and further into getting details of what the inside of a cell looks like, we still have a bunch of work until we understand it all.
Still, it looks very, very cool.
Picture credits : Electron Micrographs of Unroofed Cells of D. discoideum, Immunogold Labeled for the Localization of Arp2/3 or the LimEΔcoil ProbeCells in the left panel expressed GFP-p41-Arc, which is marked by anti-GFP antibodies.
Till Bretschneider et al. Dynamic Actin Patterns and Arp2/3 Assembly at the Substrate-Attached Surface of Motile Cells. Current Biology, Volume 14, Issue 1, 6 January 2004, Pages 1–10
- Agathe of Frontal Cortex

Life Inside a Cell

Another week, another type of microscopy. Did you notice how much I like microscopy yet ? Even though, in biology, we have to rely on two major fields, imaging and molecular science. There are things you can’t comprehend in microscopy, just like there are things you can’t see in molecular biology. These are two sides of the exact same coin, and one must juggle between both to try and get some kind of understanding of what’s happening inside the cell. With microscopy, it’s easy to understand why it’s not perfect, why it unfortunately doesn’t hold all the answers. Most of the time, we’ve fixed an instant in time, the cell was living one moment, and was dead the next, stuck forever in what it was doing at the time. Looking into the objective, you can only see what was happening then. And even when doing microscopy on living cells, we mostly have to rely on specific markers, so all of what’s going on around is invisible. Unknown. And that’s without saying that a picture is just that, a picture, and sometimes you’re just baffled by what’s on the screen, just like when you see some abstract piece of art and think “What is this and why in the world is it worth $150,000 ?”

So we might develop wonderful technologies and extravagant techniques, just like the electron microscopy on “unroofed” cells you’re seeing here, we may well go further and further into getting details of what the inside of a cell looks like, we still have a bunch of work until we understand it all.

Still, it looks very, very cool.

Picture credits : Electron Micrographs of Unroofed Cells of D. discoideum, Immunogold Labeled for the Localization of Arp2/3 or the LimEΔcoil ProbeCells in the left panel expressed GFP-p41-Arc, which is marked by anti-GFP antibodies.

Till Bretschneider et al. Dynamic Actin Patterns and Arp2/3 Assembly at the Substrate-Attached Surface of Motile Cells. Current Biology, Volume 14, Issue 1, 6 January 2004, Pages 1–10

Agathe of Frontal Cortex

microscopy electron microscopy science biology actin Frontal Cortex scientist in residence
The Beauty of Fluorescence
Probably not a very good title, because I love fluorescence very very much, and I find it beautiful very very often. But today I’m going to talk about my favorite dye. 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole or DAPI (cute name, in french we have a song which goes “Pomme de reinette et pomme d’api”, but anyway), is a fluorescent stain which binds to DNA. Therefore it is used in fluorescence microscopy to stain nuclei. It is particularly useful when applying multicolor fluorescent techniques, because the range of greens, yellows and reds sometimes makes it hard to distinguish between cells. DAPI’s blue makes a nice contrast, so we can never get lost.
Did I tell also that it’s the most beautiful thing to see in a microscope ? Because it is, it really is. Sometimes I have to remind myself I’m not looking at Avatar’s version of the night sky.
Top : Matt Benton. Two day old cricket embryo that has been partially separated from its egg. (zoo.cam.ac.uk)
Bottom : Dr. Heath Mills, Texas A&M University. Unidentified DAPI stained microorganisms within sediments as seen through a confocal microscope. (National Geographic)
Agathe of Frontal Cortex
The Beauty of Fluorescence
Probably not a very good title, because I love fluorescence very very much, and I find it beautiful very very often. But today I’m going to talk about my favorite dye. 4’,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole or DAPI (cute name, in french we have a song which goes “Pomme de reinette et pomme d’api”, but anyway), is a fluorescent stain which binds to DNA. Therefore it is used in fluorescence microscopy to stain nuclei. It is particularly useful when applying multicolor fluorescent techniques, because the range of greens, yellows and reds sometimes makes it hard to distinguish between cells. DAPI’s blue makes a nice contrast, so we can never get lost.
Did I tell also that it’s the most beautiful thing to see in a microscope ? Because it is, it really is. Sometimes I have to remind myself I’m not looking at Avatar’s version of the night sky.
Top : Matt Benton. Two day old cricket embryo that has been partially separated from its egg. (zoo.cam.ac.uk)
Bottom : Dr. Heath Mills, Texas A&M University. Unidentified DAPI stained microorganisms within sediments as seen through a confocal microscope. (National Geographic)
Agathe of Frontal Cortex
Creatures of chaos
It’s revision week once again, and while studying my cell bio notes I keep getting distracted by microscopy pictures. The cytoskeleton chapter especially is a personal favorite of mine. I’m constantly amazed by these tiny little cells that build us. Text books with their pretty pictures, or me even with this picture of sand dollar zygotes taken during mitosis, don’t do them justice. Cells are always changing shape, producing vesicles, dividing, migrating, secreting, and they wouldn’t be doing so without their fibrous skeleton which allows them to organize, stretch and move. This wonderful network itself seems fixed, but it’s polymerizing and depolymerizing at all times. We are all complex creatures, able to live because we are made of chaos.
Picture credit : George von Dassow / Learn more about it
Agathe of Frontal Cortex
Higher still and higher  
From the earth thou springest,  
Like a cloud of fire;  
The blue deep thou wingest,  
And singing still dost soar, and soaring ever singest.
    To a Skylark - Percy Bysshe Shelley
It looks like a painting or a very photoshopped picture of birds, but it’s actually an image taken in polarized light of crystallized glycine, tartaric acid and resorcinol. It was submitted by Edy Kieser to Nikon’s Small World Competition.
I’m thinking science, but I’m seeing art. I just love when that happens.
- Agathe of Frontal Cortex
Higher still and higher  
From the earth thou springest,  
Like a cloud of fire;  
The blue deep thou wingest,  
And singing still dost soar, and soaring ever singest.

    To a Skylark - Percy Bysshe Shelley

It looks like a painting or a very photoshopped picture of birds, but it’s actually an image taken in polarized light of crystallized glycine, tartaric acid and resorcinol. It was submitted by Edy Kieser to Nikon’s Small World Competition.

I’m thinking science, but I’m seeing art. I just love when that happens.

- Agathe of Frontal Cortex

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

science microscopy polarized light Nikon Small World To a Skylark poem frontal cortex scientist in residence

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