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Telling (Nature’s) Stories Through Fabric
The works by textile artist Mister Finch resemble classical illustrations of flora and fauna come to life. There is also an element of fantasy; fabric spiders having a tea party, bees the size of a human head, or over-sized fungi. The artist takes images from nature, and in the cases of some of his moths and fungi, categorizes the pieces as if they were specimens found in the wild.
Mister Finch’s inspiration mainly comes from British folklore and the natural world around him. What makes this artist unique, other than the work itself, is that the majority of the materials used are found or recycled. To the artist, it is a way of sewing in the story of the reinvented material with the final story of the finished pieces.
Storytelling, fabric arts and nature come together to create works that bring to life fantasy worlds one would only find in storybooks. Anatomically correct flora and fauna, and woodland creatures similar to the ones found in storybook illustrations are consistent in his work, truly bringing the fantasy world to life in a tangible form. The appeal of his work is nostalgic; not only does the artist use found materials with their own stories, but builds with these materials onto existing stories that can be paired with those from our childhoods, while also bringing to life scientific illustrations of particular species of moths and plants.
If you would like to see more of Mister Finch’s work, he has many high-resolution photographs on his tumblr, as well as a store where you can purchase some of his pieces.
-Anna Paluch
Telling (Nature’s) Stories Through Fabric
The works by textile artist Mister Finch resemble classical illustrations of flora and fauna come to life. There is also an element of fantasy; fabric spiders having a tea party, bees the size of a human head, or over-sized fungi. The artist takes images from nature, and in the cases of some of his moths and fungi, categorizes the pieces as if they were specimens found in the wild.
Mister Finch’s inspiration mainly comes from British folklore and the natural world around him. What makes this artist unique, other than the work itself, is that the majority of the materials used are found or recycled. To the artist, it is a way of sewing in the story of the reinvented material with the final story of the finished pieces.
Storytelling, fabric arts and nature come together to create works that bring to life fantasy worlds one would only find in storybooks. Anatomically correct flora and fauna, and woodland creatures similar to the ones found in storybook illustrations are consistent in his work, truly bringing the fantasy world to life in a tangible form. The appeal of his work is nostalgic; not only does the artist use found materials with their own stories, but builds with these materials onto existing stories that can be paired with those from our childhoods, while also bringing to life scientific illustrations of particular species of moths and plants.
If you would like to see more of Mister Finch’s work, he has many high-resolution photographs on his tumblr, as well as a store where you can purchase some of his pieces.
-Anna Paluch
Telling (Nature’s) Stories Through Fabric
The works by textile artist Mister Finch resemble classical illustrations of flora and fauna come to life. There is also an element of fantasy; fabric spiders having a tea party, bees the size of a human head, or over-sized fungi. The artist takes images from nature, and in the cases of some of his moths and fungi, categorizes the pieces as if they were specimens found in the wild.
Mister Finch’s inspiration mainly comes from British folklore and the natural world around him. What makes this artist unique, other than the work itself, is that the majority of the materials used are found or recycled. To the artist, it is a way of sewing in the story of the reinvented material with the final story of the finished pieces.
Storytelling, fabric arts and nature come together to create works that bring to life fantasy worlds one would only find in storybooks. Anatomically correct flora and fauna, and woodland creatures similar to the ones found in storybook illustrations are consistent in his work, truly bringing the fantasy world to life in a tangible form. The appeal of his work is nostalgic; not only does the artist use found materials with their own stories, but builds with these materials onto existing stories that can be paired with those from our childhoods, while also bringing to life scientific illustrations of particular species of moths and plants.
If you would like to see more of Mister Finch’s work, he has many high-resolution photographs on his tumblr, as well as a store where you can purchase some of his pieces.
-Anna Paluch

Telling (Nature’s) Stories Through Fabric

The works by textile artist Mister Finch resemble classical illustrations of flora and fauna come to life. There is also an element of fantasy; fabric spiders having a tea party, bees the size of a human head, or over-sized fungi. The artist takes images from nature, and in the cases of some of his moths and fungi, categorizes the pieces as if they were specimens found in the wild.

Mister Finch’s inspiration mainly comes from British folklore and the natural world around him. What makes this artist unique, other than the work itself, is that the majority of the materials used are found or recycled. To the artist, it is a way of sewing in the story of the reinvented material with the final story of the finished pieces.

Storytelling, fabric arts and nature come together to create works that bring to life fantasy worlds one would only find in storybooks. Anatomically correct flora and fauna, and woodland creatures similar to the ones found in storybook illustrations are consistent in his work, truly bringing the fantasy world to life in a tangible form. The appeal of his work is nostalgic; not only does the artist use found materials with their own stories, but builds with these materials onto existing stories that can be paired with those from our childhoods, while also bringing to life scientific illustrations of particular species of moths and plants.

If you would like to see more of Mister Finch’s work, he has many high-resolution photographs on his tumblr, as well as a store where you can purchase some of his pieces.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ mister finch anna paluch fabric art nature flora fauna mushrooms fungi stories textile material
Chris Drury
 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.
 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.
 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.
 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/
 - Adrian Deen
Chris Drury
 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.
 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.
 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.
 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/
 - Adrian Deen
Chris Drury
 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.
 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.
 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.
 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/
 - Adrian Deen
Chris Drury
 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.
 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.
 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.
 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/
 - Adrian Deen

Chris Drury

 What’s quite interesting about Chris Drury’s work is how there appears to be an underlying paradoxical message in some of his pieces. In ‘Mushroom Cloud’ for example, acrylic-coated mushrooms joined together by nylon thread are suspended between a steel frame to form the shape of a mushroom cloud. The irony lay in the fact that mushrooms are symbolic of the cyclical nature of the natural world; as types of fungi they can mark the onset of death through the decomposition of matter in the soil, and it is by the organic products of this decay, that plant life springs forth. Mushroom clouds on the other hand – the resulting atmospheric effects of nuclear explosions, illustrate the part that humans have played throughout the course of history in causing death. Drury dangles this metaphor before us provoking thought in our humanitarian and ecological consciences.

 ‘Hand on Heart’, in which a bloody fingerprint is superimposed on an echocardiogram is a very literal depiction of the symbiosis that exists between the rhythms of the heart and the product of its pumping, each being the consequence and elicitor of the other.

 Chris Drury’s work is captivating, as each piece feels very familiar, the audience is continually reminded of things they’ve seen in fields, forests and even hospitals, thus emphasizing how loud artwork with scientific underpinnings can resonate.

 Chris Drury’s work can be found on his website here: http://chrisdrury.co.uk/

 - Adrian Deen

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art science adrian deen chris drury mushrooms heart fingerprints

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