Our Blog

Posts tagged nature

Categories:

Telling (Nature’s) Stories Through Fabric
The works by textile artist Mister Finch resemble classical illustrations of flora and fauna come to life. There is also an element of fantasy; fabric spiders having a tea party, bees the size of a human head, or over-sized fungi. The artist takes images from nature, and in the cases of some of his moths and fungi, categorizes the pieces as if they were specimens found in the wild.
Mister Finch’s inspiration mainly comes from British folklore and the natural world around him. What makes this artist unique, other than the work itself, is that the majority of the materials used are found or recycled. To the artist, it is a way of sewing in the story of the reinvented material with the final story of the finished pieces.
Storytelling, fabric arts and nature come together to create works that bring to life fantasy worlds one would only find in storybooks. Anatomically correct flora and fauna, and woodland creatures similar to the ones found in storybook illustrations are consistent in his work, truly bringing the fantasy world to life in a tangible form. The appeal of his work is nostalgic; not only does the artist use found materials with their own stories, but builds with these materials onto existing stories that can be paired with those from our childhoods, while also bringing to life scientific illustrations of particular species of moths and plants.
If you would like to see more of Mister Finch’s work, he has many high-resolution photographs on his tumblr, as well as a store where you can purchase some of his pieces.
-Anna Paluch
Telling (Nature’s) Stories Through Fabric
The works by textile artist Mister Finch resemble classical illustrations of flora and fauna come to life. There is also an element of fantasy; fabric spiders having a tea party, bees the size of a human head, or over-sized fungi. The artist takes images from nature, and in the cases of some of his moths and fungi, categorizes the pieces as if they were specimens found in the wild.
Mister Finch’s inspiration mainly comes from British folklore and the natural world around him. What makes this artist unique, other than the work itself, is that the majority of the materials used are found or recycled. To the artist, it is a way of sewing in the story of the reinvented material with the final story of the finished pieces.
Storytelling, fabric arts and nature come together to create works that bring to life fantasy worlds one would only find in storybooks. Anatomically correct flora and fauna, and woodland creatures similar to the ones found in storybook illustrations are consistent in his work, truly bringing the fantasy world to life in a tangible form. The appeal of his work is nostalgic; not only does the artist use found materials with their own stories, but builds with these materials onto existing stories that can be paired with those from our childhoods, while also bringing to life scientific illustrations of particular species of moths and plants.
If you would like to see more of Mister Finch’s work, he has many high-resolution photographs on his tumblr, as well as a store where you can purchase some of his pieces.
-Anna Paluch
Telling (Nature’s) Stories Through Fabric
The works by textile artist Mister Finch resemble classical illustrations of flora and fauna come to life. There is also an element of fantasy; fabric spiders having a tea party, bees the size of a human head, or over-sized fungi. The artist takes images from nature, and in the cases of some of his moths and fungi, categorizes the pieces as if they were specimens found in the wild.
Mister Finch’s inspiration mainly comes from British folklore and the natural world around him. What makes this artist unique, other than the work itself, is that the majority of the materials used are found or recycled. To the artist, it is a way of sewing in the story of the reinvented material with the final story of the finished pieces.
Storytelling, fabric arts and nature come together to create works that bring to life fantasy worlds one would only find in storybooks. Anatomically correct flora and fauna, and woodland creatures similar to the ones found in storybook illustrations are consistent in his work, truly bringing the fantasy world to life in a tangible form. The appeal of his work is nostalgic; not only does the artist use found materials with their own stories, but builds with these materials onto existing stories that can be paired with those from our childhoods, while also bringing to life scientific illustrations of particular species of moths and plants.
If you would like to see more of Mister Finch’s work, he has many high-resolution photographs on his tumblr, as well as a store where you can purchase some of his pieces.
-Anna Paluch

Telling (Nature’s) Stories Through Fabric

The works by textile artist Mister Finch resemble classical illustrations of flora and fauna come to life. There is also an element of fantasy; fabric spiders having a tea party, bees the size of a human head, or over-sized fungi. The artist takes images from nature, and in the cases of some of his moths and fungi, categorizes the pieces as if they were specimens found in the wild.

Mister Finch’s inspiration mainly comes from British folklore and the natural world around him. What makes this artist unique, other than the work itself, is that the majority of the materials used are found or recycled. To the artist, it is a way of sewing in the story of the reinvented material with the final story of the finished pieces.

Storytelling, fabric arts and nature come together to create works that bring to life fantasy worlds one would only find in storybooks. Anatomically correct flora and fauna, and woodland creatures similar to the ones found in storybook illustrations are consistent in his work, truly bringing the fantasy world to life in a tangible form. The appeal of his work is nostalgic; not only does the artist use found materials with their own stories, but builds with these materials onto existing stories that can be paired with those from our childhoods, while also bringing to life scientific illustrations of particular species of moths and plants.

If you would like to see more of Mister Finch’s work, he has many high-resolution photographs on his tumblr, as well as a store where you can purchase some of his pieces.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ mister finch anna paluch fabric art nature flora fauna mushrooms fungi stories textile material
The Natural Canvas
British artist Andy Goldsworthy does not just make sculptures about nature, but makes them from natural elements that he finds. Materials commonly found in his work include leaves, rocks and even twigs, his installation space; everywhere. It can be argued that by creating these pieces, the artist turns the planet into his own canvas or installation space, as the works directly respond to their surroundings.
His natural manipulations draw upon the energy and life that is flowing through the landscape, paying homage to not only nature as an already existing piece of art, but that of a living one too. Each piece is site-specific to the landscape, transforming into the modernist ideal; conveying an experience of the real world while acknowledging the immediate physical reality of the materials. For Goldsworthy, it is not about showing the reality of man made materials like a canvas and paint brush, but the harmony of working with natural materials, that have always been readily available for our inspirations.
-Anna Paluch
The Natural Canvas
British artist Andy Goldsworthy does not just make sculptures about nature, but makes them from natural elements that he finds. Materials commonly found in his work include leaves, rocks and even twigs, his installation space; everywhere. It can be argued that by creating these pieces, the artist turns the planet into his own canvas or installation space, as the works directly respond to their surroundings.
His natural manipulations draw upon the energy and life that is flowing through the landscape, paying homage to not only nature as an already existing piece of art, but that of a living one too. Each piece is site-specific to the landscape, transforming into the modernist ideal; conveying an experience of the real world while acknowledging the immediate physical reality of the materials. For Goldsworthy, it is not about showing the reality of man made materials like a canvas and paint brush, but the harmony of working with natural materials, that have always been readily available for our inspirations.
-Anna Paluch
The Natural Canvas
British artist Andy Goldsworthy does not just make sculptures about nature, but makes them from natural elements that he finds. Materials commonly found in his work include leaves, rocks and even twigs, his installation space; everywhere. It can be argued that by creating these pieces, the artist turns the planet into his own canvas or installation space, as the works directly respond to their surroundings.
His natural manipulations draw upon the energy and life that is flowing through the landscape, paying homage to not only nature as an already existing piece of art, but that of a living one too. Each piece is site-specific to the landscape, transforming into the modernist ideal; conveying an experience of the real world while acknowledging the immediate physical reality of the materials. For Goldsworthy, it is not about showing the reality of man made materials like a canvas and paint brush, but the harmony of working with natural materials, that have always been readily available for our inspirations.
-Anna Paluch

The Natural Canvas

British artist Andy Goldsworthy does not just make sculptures about nature, but makes them from natural elements that he finds. Materials commonly found in his work include leaves, rocks and even twigs, his installation space; everywhere. It can be argued that by creating these pieces, the artist turns the planet into his own canvas or installation space, as the works directly respond to their surroundings.

His natural manipulations draw upon the energy and life that is flowing through the landscape, paying homage to not only nature as an already existing piece of art, but that of a living one too. Each piece is site-specific to the landscape, transforming into the modernist ideal; conveying an experience of the real world while acknowledging the immediate physical reality of the materials. For Goldsworthy, it is not about showing the reality of man made materials like a canvas and paint brush, but the harmony of working with natural materials, that have always been readily available for our inspirations.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ andy goldsworthy landscape art art science art and science journal installation art nature anna paluch
Fashion and Nature: Louise Richardson
Art and fashion can often go hand in hand, but what about art, fashion and nature? Artist Louise Richardson creates pieces that take viewers on a whimsical journey of fantasy, mixing natural found objects and transforming them into garments, which in turn resemble ethereal artworks.
The artist is versatile in many mediums, making shoes, clothes, butterflies, books, fiber art, and paper works to create a dream-like world with her art. The delicate pieces have the ability to transform the viewer back to a child-like imagination, the artist herself acting as a storyteller. The use of natural elements such as dandelions, hair, and shed snake skin can be seen as reminders of the aesthetic qualities of the natural world.
-Anna Paluch
Fashion and Nature: Louise Richardson
Art and fashion can often go hand in hand, but what about art, fashion and nature? Artist Louise Richardson creates pieces that take viewers on a whimsical journey of fantasy, mixing natural found objects and transforming them into garments, which in turn resemble ethereal artworks.
The artist is versatile in many mediums, making shoes, clothes, butterflies, books, fiber art, and paper works to create a dream-like world with her art. The delicate pieces have the ability to transform the viewer back to a child-like imagination, the artist herself acting as a storyteller. The use of natural elements such as dandelions, hair, and shed snake skin can be seen as reminders of the aesthetic qualities of the natural world.
-Anna Paluch

Fashion and Nature: Louise Richardson

Art and fashion can often go hand in hand, but what about art, fashion and nature? Artist Louise Richardson creates pieces that take viewers on a whimsical journey of fantasy, mixing natural found objects and transforming them into garments, which in turn resemble ethereal artworks.

The artist is versatile in many mediums, making shoes, clothes, butterflies, books, fiber art, and paper works to create a dream-like world with her art. The delicate pieces have the ability to transform the viewer back to a child-like imagination, the artist herself acting as a storyteller. The use of natural elements such as dandelions, hair, and shed snake skin can be seen as reminders of the aesthetic qualities of the natural world.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ louise richardson anna paluch nature flora fauna fashion art science art and science journal
Wildlife: Queer Zoology
Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.
The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.
Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance. Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.-Alison Cooley
Wildlife: Queer Zoology
Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.
The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.
Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance. Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.-Alison Cooley
Wildlife: Queer Zoology
Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.
The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.
Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance. Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.-Alison Cooley
Wildlife: Queer Zoology
Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.
The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.
Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance. Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.-Alison Cooley
Wildlife: Queer Zoology
Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.
The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.
Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance. Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.-Alison Cooley
Wildlife: Queer Zoology
Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.
The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.
Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance. Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.-Alison Cooley

Wildlife: Queer Zoology

Humboldt Magnussen invites us into “Wildlife: Queer Zoology” by asking that we don animal masks he has painstakingly silkscreened. Caribou, Penguin, Walrus, and Giraffe – the masks suggest we adopt new animal identities for the opening evening, adorn ourselves with new costumes that challenge the boundaries of nature and culture.

The show questions the rhetoric of queer sexuality’s natural- (or unnatural-)ness. Responding to right-wing-evangelical claims that queer sexualities and non-gender-conforming identities are unnatural, Magnussen’s exhibition features the work of seven artists who challenge this notion.

Alexis Boyle’s coil of rope snakes refers to recent research finding that male snakes which emit both male and female hormones are seen the most desirable mates, attracting frenzied attention resulting in a tangled “mating ball.” This finding suggests that long-held ideas about sexuality among animals are perhaps more politically convenient than accurate. Boyle’s work reexamines queerness in both animal and human worlds by emphasizing the degree to which the gender binary is constructed by social norms, rather than hard science.

Gustavo Cerquera Benjumea’s tongue-in-cheek sculpture plays the part of a good-luck charm (a dried llama fetus), designed to protect Videofag from homophobia and transphobia. A certificate of authenticity purportedly from the Bolivian and Columbian embassies accompanies it on the wall. Benjumea’s sculpture provides a complex mixing ground for preconceptions about both culture and sexuality, and hints at the magical, rather than strictly scientific, role of the animal.

Danielle Nicole Smith’s high-femme bejeweled works look at the parallel spaces of domesticity and domestication, pairing an image of a kitten captioned “Lady Love,” aside a sparkly text collage spelling out her girlfriend’s affectionate nickname. Meanwhile, Corinne Teed’s labourious drawing and collage works represent ambiguous human and animal sexual behaviours. In Negotiations, Teed fills the necks of two deer, antlers entangled, with images of women wrestling in the nude. The work manifests a tension between violence and tenderness, competition and play, sex and dominance.

Michael Rennick’s work refers to queer use of animal metaphor, with careful and precious paintings of individual animals (wolf, pig, otter, and bear) on underwear which has been subsequently ripped up by his dog. Mary Tremonte’s silkscreened hankies serve a similar function, charting queer self-identifying gestures through the language of the animal kingdom. Her serigraph prints document instances of queerness in the animal world, and include the story of Roy and Silo, two male chinstrap penguins at the Central Park Zoo who nested together in 1998, first caring for an egg-shaped rock, and finally hatching an adoptive egg. Together, the works in the show highlight the ecologies of queerness, and present scientific and inventive potential for worlds of human and animal identity not bound by dichotomy.

-Alison Cooley

6 Photos
/ humboldt magnussen alexis boyle mary tremonte michael rennick corinne teed danielle nicole smith gustavo cerquera benjumea queer zoology videofag art toronto ecology sexuality nature biology science canada
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters (2012-2013) is an unusual series of animal photographs: candid, uncanny, and at times startling. The hundreds of images, fauna from bears to does and deer, foxes and smaller mammals, were taken with a remote motion-detecting hunting camera that uses heat to trigger the photographic exposure. Ducharme’s artistic endeavour finds authority in the conceptualization of the project, however the artist relinquishes such charge by removing herself from the actual photo-taking process.
In their haphazard composition, over or under exposure, and blurred subjects, this suite of photographs subverts the aesthetic sensibilities of a wildlife photo-vernacular, providing instead an alternative view of the boreal spaces typically unpopulated by humankind. As such, the images afford a rare glimpse of animals at ease, unthreatened by the intimidating presence of humans.
As part of Le Mois de la Photo in Montreal, the series is continuous with the over-arching theme, Drone: the Automated Image. Here, the human is unmoored as the central productive agent, leaving wildlife and technology to mingle in the imaging process without the authoritative hand of the photographer. But unlike the militant drone, capable of wreaking remote havoc, Ducharme’s automation creates a productive space within which animals reign supreme and are bestowed with an agency otherwise denied.
The white piercing eyes, nonchalance and sincerity of the wildlife that populate Encounters provokes a reinterpretation of the proverbial falling tree: perhaps it is not a question of whether it makes a sound, but rather who hears it?
Encounters is on view until October 5 at Galerie B-312 as part of Montreal’s Le Mois de la Photo. 
-Natasha Chaykowski
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters (2012-2013) is an unusual series of animal photographs: candid, uncanny, and at times startling. The hundreds of images, fauna from bears to does and deer, foxes and smaller mammals, were taken with a remote motion-detecting hunting camera that uses heat to trigger the photographic exposure. Ducharme’s artistic endeavour finds authority in the conceptualization of the project, however the artist relinquishes such charge by removing herself from the actual photo-taking process.
In their haphazard composition, over or under exposure, and blurred subjects, this suite of photographs subverts the aesthetic sensibilities of a wildlife photo-vernacular, providing instead an alternative view of the boreal spaces typically unpopulated by humankind. As such, the images afford a rare glimpse of animals at ease, unthreatened by the intimidating presence of humans.
As part of Le Mois de la Photo in Montreal, the series is continuous with the over-arching theme, Drone: the Automated Image. Here, the human is unmoored as the central productive agent, leaving wildlife and technology to mingle in the imaging process without the authoritative hand of the photographer. But unlike the militant drone, capable of wreaking remote havoc, Ducharme’s automation creates a productive space within which animals reign supreme and are bestowed with an agency otherwise denied.
The white piercing eyes, nonchalance and sincerity of the wildlife that populate Encounters provokes a reinterpretation of the proverbial falling tree: perhaps it is not a question of whether it makes a sound, but rather who hears it?
Encounters is on view until October 5 at Galerie B-312 as part of Montreal’s Le Mois de la Photo. 
-Natasha Chaykowski
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters (2012-2013) is an unusual series of animal photographs: candid, uncanny, and at times startling. The hundreds of images, fauna from bears to does and deer, foxes and smaller mammals, were taken with a remote motion-detecting hunting camera that uses heat to trigger the photographic exposure. Ducharme’s artistic endeavour finds authority in the conceptualization of the project, however the artist relinquishes such charge by removing herself from the actual photo-taking process.
In their haphazard composition, over or under exposure, and blurred subjects, this suite of photographs subverts the aesthetic sensibilities of a wildlife photo-vernacular, providing instead an alternative view of the boreal spaces typically unpopulated by humankind. As such, the images afford a rare glimpse of animals at ease, unthreatened by the intimidating presence of humans.
As part of Le Mois de la Photo in Montreal, the series is continuous with the over-arching theme, Drone: the Automated Image. Here, the human is unmoored as the central productive agent, leaving wildlife and technology to mingle in the imaging process without the authoritative hand of the photographer. But unlike the militant drone, capable of wreaking remote havoc, Ducharme’s automation creates a productive space within which animals reign supreme and are bestowed with an agency otherwise denied.
The white piercing eyes, nonchalance and sincerity of the wildlife that populate Encounters provokes a reinterpretation of the proverbial falling tree: perhaps it is not a question of whether it makes a sound, but rather who hears it?
Encounters is on view until October 5 at Galerie B-312 as part of Montreal’s Le Mois de la Photo. 
-Natasha Chaykowski
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters
Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters (2012-2013) is an unusual series of animal photographs: candid, uncanny, and at times startling. The hundreds of images, fauna from bears to does and deer, foxes and smaller mammals, were taken with a remote motion-detecting hunting camera that uses heat to trigger the photographic exposure. Ducharme’s artistic endeavour finds authority in the conceptualization of the project, however the artist relinquishes such charge by removing herself from the actual photo-taking process.
In their haphazard composition, over or under exposure, and blurred subjects, this suite of photographs subverts the aesthetic sensibilities of a wildlife photo-vernacular, providing instead an alternative view of the boreal spaces typically unpopulated by humankind. As such, the images afford a rare glimpse of animals at ease, unthreatened by the intimidating presence of humans.
As part of Le Mois de la Photo in Montreal, the series is continuous with the over-arching theme, Drone: the Automated Image. Here, the human is unmoored as the central productive agent, leaving wildlife and technology to mingle in the imaging process without the authoritative hand of the photographer. But unlike the militant drone, capable of wreaking remote havoc, Ducharme’s automation creates a productive space within which animals reign supreme and are bestowed with an agency otherwise denied.
The white piercing eyes, nonchalance and sincerity of the wildlife that populate Encounters provokes a reinterpretation of the proverbial falling tree: perhaps it is not a question of whether it makes a sound, but rather who hears it?
Encounters is on view until October 5 at Galerie B-312 as part of Montreal’s Le Mois de la Photo. 
-Natasha Chaykowski

Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters

Véronique Ducharme’s Encounters (2012-2013) is an unusual series of animal photographs: candid, uncanny, and at times startling. The hundreds of images, fauna from bears to does and deer, foxes and smaller mammals, were taken with a remote motion-detecting hunting camera that uses heat to trigger the photographic exposure. Ducharme’s artistic endeavour finds authority in the conceptualization of the project, however the artist relinquishes such charge by removing herself from the actual photo-taking process.

In their haphazard composition, over or under exposure, and blurred subjects, this suite of photographs subverts the aesthetic sensibilities of a wildlife photo-vernacular, providing instead an alternative view of the boreal spaces typically unpopulated by humankind. As such, the images afford a rare glimpse of animals at ease, unthreatened by the intimidating presence of humans.

As part of Le Mois de la Photo in Montreal, the series is continuous with the over-arching theme, Drone: the Automated Image. Here, the human is unmoored as the central productive agent, leaving wildlife and technology to mingle in the imaging process without the authoritative hand of the photographer. But unlike the militant drone, capable of wreaking remote havoc, Ducharme’s automation creates a productive space within which animals reign supreme and are bestowed with an agency otherwise denied.

The white piercing eyes, nonchalance and sincerity of the wildlife that populate Encounters provokes a reinterpretation of the proverbial falling tree: perhaps it is not a question of whether it makes a sound, but rather who hears it?

Encounters is on view until October 5 at Galerie B-312 as part of Montreal’s Le Mois de la Photo. 

-Natasha Chaykowski

4 Photos
/ art science nature animals night veronique ducharme encounters Natasha Chaykowski
God’s Prototype by Ian Crawley
As if ‘playing God’ artist Ian Crawley is taking found objects in nature, such as stones, sticks and moss, to recreate the human body. Humorously, the artist describes these pieces as what he imagined God’s first ‘sketches’ or prototypes of the human body would look like, with the materials that were available.
But this work isn’t focusing on Creationism or who (or what) created whom, but the connection we as humans have to nature. Reflecting on the natural-made versus man-made. These natural objects have always been used by humans to sustain them us nutrition, or protect them us weapons. Even though we now have processed foods and more advanced weaponry, there is still a need for natural objects. We need trees for oxygen, don’t we? Coexistence is the main theme in this work.
In the end, God’s Prototype is there to remind us that we aren’t above or below stones, sticks, and plants. We are part of the same level of natural objects, and though we’re made out of flesh and not leaves, we’re still as natural as a leaf or a rock. 
-Anna Paluch

God’s Prototype by Ian Crawley


As if ‘playing God’ artist
Ian Crawley is taking found objects in nature, such as stones, sticks and moss, to recreate the human body. Humorously, the artist describes these pieces as what he imagined God’s first ‘sketches’ or prototypes of the human body would look like, with the materials that were available.

But this work isn’t focusing on Creationism or who (or what) created whom, but the connection we as humans have to nature. Reflecting on the natural-made versus man-made. These natural objects have always been used by humans to sustain them us nutrition, or protect them us weapons. Even though we now have processed foods and more advanced weaponry, there is still a need for natural objects. We need trees for oxygen, don’t we? Coexistence is the main theme in this work.

In the end, God’s Prototype is there to remind us that we aren’t above or below stones, sticks, and plants. We are part of the same level of natural objects, and though we’re made out of flesh and not leaves, we’re still as natural as a leaf or a rock. 

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

anna paluch ian crawley biology nature plants rocks art science art and science journal
Rogan Brown’s Paper Sculptures
Through his delicate paper sculptures, Rogan Brown expresses his fascination with the intricacy of the natural world. Drawing inspiration from scientific illustrations, Brown’s hand-cut pieces do not represent a single organism, but reflect themes found in nature. The patterns that Brown searches for exist in different scales, ranging from single cells to large geological formations.
Although each project is incredibly time consuming, Brown states that the amount of time spent on each sculpture is part of its meaning. Certainly, thinking about how much labour goes in to each piece leaves you in awe. The artist states that he chose paper as his medium because “it captures perfectly that mixture of delicacy and durability that for me characterizes the natural world” (Rogan Brown).
-Janine Truong
Rogan Brown’s Paper Sculptures
Through his delicate paper sculptures, Rogan Brown expresses his fascination with the intricacy of the natural world. Drawing inspiration from scientific illustrations, Brown’s hand-cut pieces do not represent a single organism, but reflect themes found in nature. The patterns that Brown searches for exist in different scales, ranging from single cells to large geological formations.
Although each project is incredibly time consuming, Brown states that the amount of time spent on each sculpture is part of its meaning. Certainly, thinking about how much labour goes in to each piece leaves you in awe. The artist states that he chose paper as his medium because “it captures perfectly that mixture of delicacy and durability that for me characterizes the natural world” (Rogan Brown).
-Janine Truong
Rogan Brown’s Paper Sculptures
Through his delicate paper sculptures, Rogan Brown expresses his fascination with the intricacy of the natural world. Drawing inspiration from scientific illustrations, Brown’s hand-cut pieces do not represent a single organism, but reflect themes found in nature. The patterns that Brown searches for exist in different scales, ranging from single cells to large geological formations.
Although each project is incredibly time consuming, Brown states that the amount of time spent on each sculpture is part of its meaning. Certainly, thinking about how much labour goes in to each piece leaves you in awe. The artist states that he chose paper as his medium because “it captures perfectly that mixture of delicacy and durability that for me characterizes the natural world” (Rogan Brown).
-Janine Truong
Rogan Brown’s Paper Sculptures
Through his delicate paper sculptures, Rogan Brown expresses his fascination with the intricacy of the natural world. Drawing inspiration from scientific illustrations, Brown’s hand-cut pieces do not represent a single organism, but reflect themes found in nature. The patterns that Brown searches for exist in different scales, ranging from single cells to large geological formations.
Although each project is incredibly time consuming, Brown states that the amount of time spent on each sculpture is part of its meaning. Certainly, thinking about how much labour goes in to each piece leaves you in awe. The artist states that he chose paper as his medium because “it captures perfectly that mixture of delicacy and durability that for me characterizes the natural world” (Rogan Brown).
-Janine Truong
Rogan Brown’s Paper Sculptures
Through his delicate paper sculptures, Rogan Brown expresses his fascination with the intricacy of the natural world. Drawing inspiration from scientific illustrations, Brown’s hand-cut pieces do not represent a single organism, but reflect themes found in nature. The patterns that Brown searches for exist in different scales, ranging from single cells to large geological formations.
Although each project is incredibly time consuming, Brown states that the amount of time spent on each sculpture is part of its meaning. Certainly, thinking about how much labour goes in to each piece leaves you in awe. The artist states that he chose paper as his medium because “it captures perfectly that mixture of delicacy and durability that for me characterizes the natural world” (Rogan Brown).
-Janine Truong
Jerry’s Map: Building a World
Every artwork begins with an idea that interests the artist enough to compel them to create something from it. From the initial mark made at the beginning, the artist is creating in response to an idea that expands and changes as the work develops. Jerry Gretzinger has acted upon this notion of responding to an idea in the map that he has created, and continued to create for 50 years.
Jerry’s Map has ‘evolved’ over the years, growing out of a systemic, intricate process that Jerry has created himself. Jerry uses a deck of playing cards, which he dubs the ‘future predictor’, that gives him a set of instructions on what parts of the map he will work on that day. Depending on the instruction, Jerry can build different sections of the world he has created: add new institutions to a city or town, paint some new farmland, scan and archive original pieces and work on the next generation of each map card. Each change is recorded in his computer spreadsheet that contains the population of each town he had created. By using a deck of playing cards, Jerry allows for chance to play a major role in his world-building, and it keeps the map stimulating for him to work on.

Another element of chance that he allows to seep in is his ‘new void’ card, which dictates that Jerry wipe out a section of the map with a splotch of white. As the void expands, the map gets eaten up by the whiteness and replaced with the grey worlds that appear within the void. This idea of destroying and creating anew puts Jerry in a dual position of creator and observer, something that he remarks as being fascinating. The map has obviously taken on a life of its own, and has expanded to being more than 2500 pieces of 8x10 inch card. Having a few prints of the map and one original piece in my possession, I can affirm that they are intricately thought out, beautiful small treasures that show one artist’s dedication to an idea.
If you would like to see Gregory Whitmore’s short film about Jerry and his map (highly recommended), click here.
Jerry is also collaborating with other artists to make more map pieces. To check that out,  or if you’re interested in buying a print, check out Jerry’s website here.
-Lea Hamilton
Jerry’s Map: Building a World
Every artwork begins with an idea that interests the artist enough to compel them to create something from it. From the initial mark made at the beginning, the artist is creating in response to an idea that expands and changes as the work develops. Jerry Gretzinger has acted upon this notion of responding to an idea in the map that he has created, and continued to create for 50 years.
Jerry’s Map has ‘evolved’ over the years, growing out of a systemic, intricate process that Jerry has created himself. Jerry uses a deck of playing cards, which he dubs the ‘future predictor’, that gives him a set of instructions on what parts of the map he will work on that day. Depending on the instruction, Jerry can build different sections of the world he has created: add new institutions to a city or town, paint some new farmland, scan and archive original pieces and work on the next generation of each map card. Each change is recorded in his computer spreadsheet that contains the population of each town he had created. By using a deck of playing cards, Jerry allows for chance to play a major role in his world-building, and it keeps the map stimulating for him to work on.

Another element of chance that he allows to seep in is his ‘new void’ card, which dictates that Jerry wipe out a section of the map with a splotch of white. As the void expands, the map gets eaten up by the whiteness and replaced with the grey worlds that appear within the void. This idea of destroying and creating anew puts Jerry in a dual position of creator and observer, something that he remarks as being fascinating. The map has obviously taken on a life of its own, and has expanded to being more than 2500 pieces of 8x10 inch card. Having a few prints of the map and one original piece in my possession, I can affirm that they are intricately thought out, beautiful small treasures that show one artist’s dedication to an idea.
If you would like to see Gregory Whitmore’s short film about Jerry and his map (highly recommended), click here.
Jerry is also collaborating with other artists to make more map pieces. To check that out,  or if you’re interested in buying a print, check out Jerry’s website here.
-Lea Hamilton
Jerry’s Map: Building a World
Every artwork begins with an idea that interests the artist enough to compel them to create something from it. From the initial mark made at the beginning, the artist is creating in response to an idea that expands and changes as the work develops. Jerry Gretzinger has acted upon this notion of responding to an idea in the map that he has created, and continued to create for 50 years.
Jerry’s Map has ‘evolved’ over the years, growing out of a systemic, intricate process that Jerry has created himself. Jerry uses a deck of playing cards, which he dubs the ‘future predictor’, that gives him a set of instructions on what parts of the map he will work on that day. Depending on the instruction, Jerry can build different sections of the world he has created: add new institutions to a city or town, paint some new farmland, scan and archive original pieces and work on the next generation of each map card. Each change is recorded in his computer spreadsheet that contains the population of each town he had created. By using a deck of playing cards, Jerry allows for chance to play a major role in his world-building, and it keeps the map stimulating for him to work on.

Another element of chance that he allows to seep in is his ‘new void’ card, which dictates that Jerry wipe out a section of the map with a splotch of white. As the void expands, the map gets eaten up by the whiteness and replaced with the grey worlds that appear within the void. This idea of destroying and creating anew puts Jerry in a dual position of creator and observer, something that he remarks as being fascinating. The map has obviously taken on a life of its own, and has expanded to being more than 2500 pieces of 8x10 inch card. Having a few prints of the map and one original piece in my possession, I can affirm that they are intricately thought out, beautiful small treasures that show one artist’s dedication to an idea.
If you would like to see Gregory Whitmore’s short film about Jerry and his map (highly recommended), click here.
Jerry is also collaborating with other artists to make more map pieces. To check that out,  or if you’re interested in buying a print, check out Jerry’s website here.
-Lea Hamilton
Jerry’s Map: Building a World
Every artwork begins with an idea that interests the artist enough to compel them to create something from it. From the initial mark made at the beginning, the artist is creating in response to an idea that expands and changes as the work develops. Jerry Gretzinger has acted upon this notion of responding to an idea in the map that he has created, and continued to create for 50 years.
Jerry’s Map has ‘evolved’ over the years, growing out of a systemic, intricate process that Jerry has created himself. Jerry uses a deck of playing cards, which he dubs the ‘future predictor’, that gives him a set of instructions on what parts of the map he will work on that day. Depending on the instruction, Jerry can build different sections of the world he has created: add new institutions to a city or town, paint some new farmland, scan and archive original pieces and work on the next generation of each map card. Each change is recorded in his computer spreadsheet that contains the population of each town he had created. By using a deck of playing cards, Jerry allows for chance to play a major role in his world-building, and it keeps the map stimulating for him to work on.

Another element of chance that he allows to seep in is his ‘new void’ card, which dictates that Jerry wipe out a section of the map with a splotch of white. As the void expands, the map gets eaten up by the whiteness and replaced with the grey worlds that appear within the void. This idea of destroying and creating anew puts Jerry in a dual position of creator and observer, something that he remarks as being fascinating. The map has obviously taken on a life of its own, and has expanded to being more than 2500 pieces of 8x10 inch card. Having a few prints of the map and one original piece in my possession, I can affirm that they are intricately thought out, beautiful small treasures that show one artist’s dedication to an idea.
If you would like to see Gregory Whitmore’s short film about Jerry and his map (highly recommended), click here.
Jerry is also collaborating with other artists to make more map pieces. To check that out,  or if you’re interested in buying a print, check out Jerry’s website here.
-Lea Hamilton

Jerry’s Map: Building a World

Every artwork begins with an idea that interests the artist enough to compel them to create something from it. From the initial mark made at the beginning, the artist is creating in response to an idea that expands and changes as the work develops. Jerry Gretzinger has acted upon this notion of responding to an idea in the map that he has created, and continued to create for 50 years.

Jerry’s Map has ‘evolved’ over the years, growing out of a systemic, intricate process that Jerry has created himself. Jerry uses a deck of playing cards, which he dubs the ‘future predictor’, that gives him a set of instructions on what parts of the map he will work on that day. Depending on the instruction, Jerry can build different sections of the world he has created: add new institutions to a city or town, paint some new farmland, scan and archive original pieces and work on the next generation of each map card. Each change is recorded in his computer spreadsheet that contains the population of each town he had created. By using a deck of playing cards, Jerry allows for chance to play a major role in his world-building, and it keeps the map stimulating for him to work on.

image

Another element of chance that he allows to seep in is his ‘new void’ card, which dictates that Jerry wipe out a section of the map with a splotch of white. As the void expands, the map gets eaten up by the whiteness and replaced with the grey worlds that appear within the void. This idea of destroying and creating anew puts Jerry in a dual position of creator and observer, something that he remarks as being fascinating. The map has obviously taken on a life of its own, and has expanded to being more than 2500 pieces of 8x10 inch card. Having a few prints of the map and one original piece in my possession, I can affirm that they are intricately thought out, beautiful small treasures that show one artist’s dedication to an idea.

If you would like to see Gregory Whitmore’s short film about Jerry and his map (highly recommended), click here.

Jerry is also collaborating with other artists to make more map pieces. To check that out,  or if you’re interested in buying a print, check out Jerry’s website here.

-Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ map art cartography world building Jerry Gretzinger Lea Hamilton drawing painting mapping inspiring nature art and science journal
Lightning Strike: Sou Fujimoto’s Architecture

Lightning is something that frightens most people, with the booms of thunderclaps that accompany it, and the potential destruction it can cause when objects are struck. But lightning can also be beautiful to watch. Taking the dangerous element out of the natural phenomenon and only mimicking its beauty, architect Sou Fujimoto has constructed a giant cloud-like pavilion that recreates an electrical storm.


The pavilion itself, completely white and constructed out of 20mm steel poles, is huge. Covering 3800 square feet, the network of metal is impressive enough by itself during the day. But come night time, it becomes a geometric metal cloud that flashes LED lights in the same pattern as an electrical storm would take. The immersion of the installation is increased by the use of soundbites, timed to create the auditory effect of thunder after each ‘lightning strike’.
Fujimoto’s pavilion was commissioned by Serpentine Gallery, and the LED lights were commissioned and installed by United Visual Artists. Check out their website here.
-Lea Hamilton
Lightning Strike: Sou Fujimoto’s Architecture

Lightning is something that frightens most people, with the booms of thunderclaps that accompany it, and the potential destruction it can cause when objects are struck. But lightning can also be beautiful to watch. Taking the dangerous element out of the natural phenomenon and only mimicking its beauty, architect Sou Fujimoto has constructed a giant cloud-like pavilion that recreates an electrical storm.


The pavilion itself, completely white and constructed out of 20mm steel poles, is huge. Covering 3800 square feet, the network of metal is impressive enough by itself during the day. But come night time, it becomes a geometric metal cloud that flashes LED lights in the same pattern as an electrical storm would take. The immersion of the installation is increased by the use of soundbites, timed to create the auditory effect of thunder after each ‘lightning strike’.
Fujimoto’s pavilion was commissioned by Serpentine Gallery, and the LED lights were commissioned and installed by United Visual Artists. Check out their website here.
-Lea Hamilton
Lightning Strike: Sou Fujimoto’s Architecture

Lightning is something that frightens most people, with the booms of thunderclaps that accompany it, and the potential destruction it can cause when objects are struck. But lightning can also be beautiful to watch. Taking the dangerous element out of the natural phenomenon and only mimicking its beauty, architect Sou Fujimoto has constructed a giant cloud-like pavilion that recreates an electrical storm.


The pavilion itself, completely white and constructed out of 20mm steel poles, is huge. Covering 3800 square feet, the network of metal is impressive enough by itself during the day. But come night time, it becomes a geometric metal cloud that flashes LED lights in the same pattern as an electrical storm would take. The immersion of the installation is increased by the use of soundbites, timed to create the auditory effect of thunder after each ‘lightning strike’.
Fujimoto’s pavilion was commissioned by Serpentine Gallery, and the LED lights were commissioned and installed by United Visual Artists. Check out their website here.
-Lea Hamilton
Lightning Strike: Sou Fujimoto’s Architecture

Lightning is something that frightens most people, with the booms of thunderclaps that accompany it, and the potential destruction it can cause when objects are struck. But lightning can also be beautiful to watch. Taking the dangerous element out of the natural phenomenon and only mimicking its beauty, architect Sou Fujimoto has constructed a giant cloud-like pavilion that recreates an electrical storm.


The pavilion itself, completely white and constructed out of 20mm steel poles, is huge. Covering 3800 square feet, the network of metal is impressive enough by itself during the day. But come night time, it becomes a geometric metal cloud that flashes LED lights in the same pattern as an electrical storm would take. The immersion of the installation is increased by the use of soundbites, timed to create the auditory effect of thunder after each ‘lightning strike’.
Fujimoto’s pavilion was commissioned by Serpentine Gallery, and the LED lights were commissioned and installed by United Visual Artists. Check out their website here.
-Lea Hamilton

Lightning Strike: Sou Fujimoto’s Architecture


Lightning is something that frightens most people, with the booms of thunderclaps that accompany it, and the potential destruction it can cause when objects are struck. But lightning can also be beautiful to watch. Taking the dangerous element out of the natural phenomenon and only mimicking its beauty, architect Sou Fujimoto has constructed a giant cloud-like pavilion that recreates an electrical storm.


image

The pavilion itself, completely white and constructed out of 20mm steel poles, is huge. Covering 3800 square feet, the network of metal is impressive enough by itself during the day. But come night time, it becomes a geometric metal cloud that flashes LED lights in the same pattern as an electrical storm would take. The immersion of the installation is increased by the use of soundbites, timed to create the auditory effect of thunder after each ‘lightning strike’.

Fujimoto’s pavilion was commissioned by Serpentine Gallery, and the LED lights were commissioned and installed by United Visual Artists. Check out their website here.

-Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ lightning installation Sou Fujimoto UVA Lea Hamilton art electricity nature
SHIFT | The Ottawa School of Art | Grad Show 2013
SHIFT is a Grad Show currently on exhibit at the Ottawa School of Art, until the 25th of July, 2013. It features the works of graduates Melissa Blackman, Virginia Dupuis, Kimberly Edgar, Jane Ladan, Kathleen McCrea and Jenn Noseworthy, and what’s great about it is that all their unique works come together flawlessly, to create a cornucopia of natural whimsy.
Whether it’s Jenn Noseworthy’s floating bee’s, Jane Ladan’s coral reef-like sculptural neck-pieces or Melissa Blackman’s psychedelic paintings, walking into the exhibition space feels like walking into an ethereal space, as if from a fairy tale.
You almost expect a few fairies or garden gnomes to pop up once in awhile.
The hanging bee’s are much larger than normal bees, and even though they are hanging in a swarm formation, they are more of a welcome party than a threat, placed just outside the gallery space. The sculptural neck-pieces on the other hand, look like regalia on display.
The paintings, prints and images on the walls set the ambiance and backdrop to this magical experience.
- Anna Paluch

SHIFT | The Ottawa School of Art | Grad Show 2013

SHIFT is a Grad Show currently on exhibit at the Ottawa School of Art, until the 25th of July, 2013. It features the works of graduates Melissa Blackman, Virginia Dupuis, Kimberly Edgar, Jane Ladan, Kathleen McCrea and Jenn Noseworthy, and what’s great about it is that all their unique works come together flawlessly, to create a cornucopia of natural whimsy.

Whether it’s Jenn Noseworthy’s floating bee’s, Jane Ladan’s coral reef-like sculptural neck-pieces or Melissa Blackman’s psychedelic paintings, walking into the exhibition space feels like walking into an ethereal space, as if from a fairy tale.

You almost expect a few fairies or garden gnomes to pop up once in awhile.

The hanging bee’s are much larger than normal bees, and even though they are hanging in a swarm formation, they are more of a welcome party than a threat, placed just outside the gallery space. The sculptural neck-pieces on the other hand, look like regalia on display.

The paintings, prints and images on the walls set the ambiance and backdrop to this magical experience.

Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

shift ottawa school of art jane ladan jenn noseworthy melissa blackman virginia dupuis kimberly edgar kathleen mccrea nature coral bees painting printing flies art science art and science journal anna paluch

Contact Us

Please include your email address