Our Blog

Posts tagged optical illusion

Categories:

Personal Planets
When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.
The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.
Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.
-Anna Paluch
Personal Planets
When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.
The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.
Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.
-Anna Paluch
Personal Planets
When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.
The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.
Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.
-Anna Paluch
Personal Planets
When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.
The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.
Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.
-Anna Paluch

Personal Planets

When exploring the known universe, some might wonder what new planets we may discover, occupied or uninhabited. Two artists however, Wouter van Buuren and Zainab Hussain have created landscape photographs that turn our own cities into planets, with a Little Prince-esque aesthetic.

The planet-like compositions of van Buuren look like Super Mario Galaxy levels come to life, combining all visible forms into a perfect spherical shape. What was once the downtown core of one city (such as Weert or Shanghai) now becomes its own planet. This composition connotes ideas of our homes being the centre of the universe, where, like the Little Prince, these constructed worlds become our little asteroid or planet on which we live and experience.

Zainab Hussain however, creates more specific planets, such as “West Chapters Planet” (2012), which, according to the artist’s statement, explores “the strip mall environment in suburban areas and our relationship with it”. The artist also plays with the idea of these little worlds, being “first worlds”, existing only to provide convenience. Moving from van Buuren’s urban planets, into Hussain’s suburban planets, the mapping of cities and outlying areas plays on the ideas of comfort and convenience, engulfing us. Apart from planets, the artist has also created holes, inverse images of her planets, acting like voids which suck in all that surrounds them, such as “South Cineplex Hole” (2012). Now, what used to be 360 degrees of familiar comfort becomes 360 degrees of overwhelming commodity.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ anna paluch zainab hussain wouter van buuren photography landscape landscape photography planets optical illusion art science art and science journal
SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch
SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch
SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch
SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch

SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design

Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.

It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.

Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.

Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.

For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ anna paluch Super Nature Design Dreamscape New Angles PRISMA1666 Lost in Pascal's Triangle optics light technology optical illusion Wonwei geometry interactive art art science art and science journal LED hypercube dimensions media art design shanghai
The Optical Illusions of Kohei Nawa
Using crystal beads and prism sheets, artist Kohei Nawa manipulates the audience’s perceptions of the images. In his PixCell (Beads) series (2005-2009), taxidermy animals are covered in clear crystal beads, obstructing our perception of the surface, and thus, the true image of the animal. In his PixCell (Prism) series (2003-2009), Nawa encases objects in acrylic boxes, but, with an added layer of prism sheets, that cut the light travelling into the boxes in two, and creating the illusion of multiples of the object, much like a hologram. In the latter work, the sculptural pieces are placed in a room that optically flattens the space and the works; the artist is taking already three-dimensional objects, flattening them by playing with the configuration of the space to appear two-dimensional, then placing prism sheets in the acrylic boxes to render the images three-dimensional by playing with the configuration in the smaller spaces of the boxes.
Distortion is a key element in the artists’ work. The skin of the animals in the PixCell (Beads) series is altered, creating a different view of the structure of the animal as a whole, and through each individual bead. The artist himself described the animals as being “replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision ‘the cell of an image’ (PixCell) is shown”, where the beads become the new ‘biological’ make-up of the animal. The random grouping of some of the beads can be seen as a direct commentary on how we perceive images, especially how the public is fed information, and the fact that sometimes even seeing the whole picture, with all the information, can still obscure the original intent of a piece. It is all in perception; two people seeing a piece will go away from it with two different perspectives on its intention or meaning.
-Anna Paluch
The Optical Illusions of Kohei Nawa
Using crystal beads and prism sheets, artist Kohei Nawa manipulates the audience’s perceptions of the images. In his PixCell (Beads) series (2005-2009), taxidermy animals are covered in clear crystal beads, obstructing our perception of the surface, and thus, the true image of the animal. In his PixCell (Prism) series (2003-2009), Nawa encases objects in acrylic boxes, but, with an added layer of prism sheets, that cut the light travelling into the boxes in two, and creating the illusion of multiples of the object, much like a hologram. In the latter work, the sculptural pieces are placed in a room that optically flattens the space and the works; the artist is taking already three-dimensional objects, flattening them by playing with the configuration of the space to appear two-dimensional, then placing prism sheets in the acrylic boxes to render the images three-dimensional by playing with the configuration in the smaller spaces of the boxes.
Distortion is a key element in the artists’ work. The skin of the animals in the PixCell (Beads) series is altered, creating a different view of the structure of the animal as a whole, and through each individual bead. The artist himself described the animals as being “replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision ‘the cell of an image’ (PixCell) is shown”, where the beads become the new ‘biological’ make-up of the animal. The random grouping of some of the beads can be seen as a direct commentary on how we perceive images, especially how the public is fed information, and the fact that sometimes even seeing the whole picture, with all the information, can still obscure the original intent of a piece. It is all in perception; two people seeing a piece will go away from it with two different perspectives on its intention or meaning.
-Anna Paluch
The Optical Illusions of Kohei Nawa
Using crystal beads and prism sheets, artist Kohei Nawa manipulates the audience’s perceptions of the images. In his PixCell (Beads) series (2005-2009), taxidermy animals are covered in clear crystal beads, obstructing our perception of the surface, and thus, the true image of the animal. In his PixCell (Prism) series (2003-2009), Nawa encases objects in acrylic boxes, but, with an added layer of prism sheets, that cut the light travelling into the boxes in two, and creating the illusion of multiples of the object, much like a hologram. In the latter work, the sculptural pieces are placed in a room that optically flattens the space and the works; the artist is taking already three-dimensional objects, flattening them by playing with the configuration of the space to appear two-dimensional, then placing prism sheets in the acrylic boxes to render the images three-dimensional by playing with the configuration in the smaller spaces of the boxes.
Distortion is a key element in the artists’ work. The skin of the animals in the PixCell (Beads) series is altered, creating a different view of the structure of the animal as a whole, and through each individual bead. The artist himself described the animals as being “replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision ‘the cell of an image’ (PixCell) is shown”, where the beads become the new ‘biological’ make-up of the animal. The random grouping of some of the beads can be seen as a direct commentary on how we perceive images, especially how the public is fed information, and the fact that sometimes even seeing the whole picture, with all the information, can still obscure the original intent of a piece. It is all in perception; two people seeing a piece will go away from it with two different perspectives on its intention or meaning.
-Anna Paluch

The Optical Illusions of Kohei Nawa

Using crystal beads and prism sheets, artist Kohei Nawa manipulates the audience’s perceptions of the images. In his PixCell (Beads) series (2005-2009), taxidermy animals are covered in clear crystal beads, obstructing our perception of the surface, and thus, the true image of the animal. In his PixCell (Prism) series (2003-2009), Nawa encases objects in acrylic boxes, but, with an added layer of prism sheets, that cut the light travelling into the boxes in two, and creating the illusion of multiples of the object, much like a hologram. In the latter work, the sculptural pieces are placed in a room that optically flattens the space and the works; the artist is taking already three-dimensional objects, flattening them by playing with the configuration of the space to appear two-dimensional, then placing prism sheets in the acrylic boxes to render the images three-dimensional by playing with the configuration in the smaller spaces of the boxes.

Distortion is a key element in the artists’ work. The skin of the animals in the PixCell (Beads) series is altered, creating a different view of the structure of the animal as a whole, and through each individual bead. The artist himself described the animals as being “replaced by ‘a husk of light’, and the new vision ‘the cell of an image’ (PixCell) is shown”, where the beads become the new ‘biological’ make-up of the animal. The random grouping of some of the beads can be seen as a direct commentary on how we perceive images, especially how the public is fed information, and the fact that sometimes even seeing the whole picture, with all the information, can still obscure the original intent of a piece. It is all in perception; two people seeing a piece will go away from it with two different perspectives on its intention or meaning.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ kohei nawa anna paluch optical illusion optics crystals prisms light art science art and science journal

Enter the Box


When watching the video 
Box (2013), it feels like watching a clip of a film studio’s 3-D graphics reel. In fact, Box is a live-performance piece created by the group Bot & Dolly that challenges the viewers perceptions of space and surface, by projecting images onto a moving box. Sounds simple enough, but the optical illusions that the performance creates questions logical space. An object goes from flat to three-dimensional within seconds, and then even within the structure, three-dimensional shapes begin to form.

The technology used behind this performance is called projection-mapping, where the projector follows the object perfectly, making it seem like a living thing, rather than a sedentary shape. Aside from projection mapping and a bit of human help, the whole project is controlled by robotics and engineering software, coming together to challenge the limits of artistic and technical expression.

If you haven’t already watched the video take a look! Feel yourself get hypnotized by the visual display on your screen. Imagine the endless possibilities of self-expression that can come from this type of technology.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

scienceartanna paluchboxprojectionvideoart and science journalbox & dollyroboticsengineeringsoftwareoptical illusiontechnology
Come a Little Closer, And You Shall See…
The parallels between artistic strategies and natural occurrences are many. Where Neo-Impressionistic masters, such as Paul Signac or Georges Seurat created divisionistic works, mimicking the separation of colour from light that our eyes mesh together to create an optical illusion of blended colour, now, with the endless possibilities of science, we can see similar ‘special effects’ in microbiology.
Upon first observation, Dr. Daniela Malide’s photograph of connective tissue cells looks like a close-up of a painting by the aforementioned Signac or Seurat. Yet these connective tissues have been co-transduced with fluorescent proteins, giving off the vibrant colours seen in the image. The cells begin to connect with each other, sometimes meshing colours, but they are still reminiscent of the technique of painting with colour and light of the Neo-Impressionists.
It’s just another, funny little coincidence, of science and art, coming together to both make something beautiful, and teach us about the world around us.  
-Anna Paluch

Come a Little Closer, And You Shall See…


The parallels between artistic strategies and natural occurrences are many. Where Neo-Impressionistic masters, such as
Paul Signac or Georges Seurat created divisionistic works, mimicking the separation of colour from light that our eyes mesh together to create an optical illusion of blended colour, now, with the endless possibilities of science, we can see similar ‘special effects’ in microbiology.

Upon first observation, Dr. Daniela Malide’s photograph of connective tissue cells looks like a close-up of a painting by the aforementioned Signac or Seurat. Yet these connective tissues have been co-transduced with fluorescent proteins, giving off the vibrant colours seen in the image. The cells begin to connect with each other, sometimes meshing colours, but they are still reminiscent of the technique of painting with colour and light of the Neo-Impressionists.

It’s just another, funny little coincidence, of science and art, coming together to both make something beautiful, and teach us about the world around us.  

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Paul Signac Georges Seurat Dr. Daniela Mlide photography painting neo-impressionist microscopic microbiology colour and light optical illusion divisionism anna paluch art science
Lisha Bai
This architectural installation at the National Academy in New York City by artist Lisha Bai is titled Undulate. These illusory floor tiles add dimension and movement to an otherwise overlooked space; a traditional setting is instantly made creative and contemporary. By playing with perception, Bai is able to reimagine the floor beneath our feet as a place of artistic potential and exploration.
For more of Bai’s work, check out her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Lisha Bai
This architectural installation at the National Academy in New York City by artist Lisha Bai is titled Undulate. These illusory floor tiles add dimension and movement to an otherwise overlooked space; a traditional setting is instantly made creative and contemporary. By playing with perception, Bai is able to reimagine the floor beneath our feet as a place of artistic potential and exploration.
For more of Bai’s work, check out her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Lisha Bai
This architectural installation at the National Academy in New York City by artist Lisha Bai is titled Undulate. These illusory floor tiles add dimension and movement to an otherwise overlooked space; a traditional setting is instantly made creative and contemporary. By playing with perception, Bai is able to reimagine the floor beneath our feet as a place of artistic potential and exploration.
For more of Bai’s work, check out her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Lisha Bai
This architectural installation at the National Academy in New York City by artist Lisha Bai is titled Undulate. These illusory floor tiles add dimension and movement to an otherwise overlooked space; a traditional setting is instantly made creative and contemporary. By playing with perception, Bai is able to reimagine the floor beneath our feet as a place of artistic potential and exploration.
For more of Bai’s work, check out her website here.
- Erin Saunders
Magic Eye
Building off of yesterday’s post, here’s some optical illusion nostalgia to get your ‘90’s flashbacks flowing: Magic Eye. 
As many of you will remember, Magic Eye books flourished around the late 90’s and contained a collection of patterns (in technical language, know as “random-dot autostereograms”), which, when looked at with the proper technique, would reveal a secret 3D image. 
In my recollection, this technique involved something along the lines of staring off into the distance of the page and resisting the urge to blink. Another method I remember required you to begin with your nose against the page and to then slowly pull the book away from your face.
Apparently, the magic behind Magic Eye is that “the images have a horizontally repeating pattern which differs slightly with each repetition, therefore giving the illusion of depth when each eye focuses on a different part of the pattern”.
The explanation sounds so simple now. In the heat of the Magic Eye Moment, though, it really felt like we were on the brink of time-travel, or something. The Millenium was coming, after all. TLC was walking on the ceiling in their "No Scrubs" music video, and it was a BIG DEAL. The cool kids were wearing all-silver. 
Magic Eye holds this same aesthetic. I feel the anticipation of Y2K when I look at these pixelated aquariums and rosebeds, and I love it. 
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
Magic Eye
Building off of yesterday’s post, here’s some optical illusion nostalgia to get your ‘90’s flashbacks flowing: Magic Eye. 
As many of you will remember, Magic Eye books flourished around the late 90’s and contained a collection of patterns (in technical language, know as “random-dot autostereograms”), which, when looked at with the proper technique, would reveal a secret 3D image. 
In my recollection, this technique involved something along the lines of staring off into the distance of the page and resisting the urge to blink. Another method I remember required you to begin with your nose against the page and to then slowly pull the book away from your face.
Apparently, the magic behind Magic Eye is that “the images have a horizontally repeating pattern which differs slightly with each repetition, therefore giving the illusion of depth when each eye focuses on a different part of the pattern”.
The explanation sounds so simple now. In the heat of the Magic Eye Moment, though, it really felt like we were on the brink of time-travel, or something. The Millenium was coming, after all. TLC was walking on the ceiling in their "No Scrubs" music video, and it was a BIG DEAL. The cool kids were wearing all-silver. 
Magic Eye holds this same aesthetic. I feel the anticipation of Y2K when I look at these pixelated aquariums and rosebeds, and I love it. 
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
Magic Eye
Building off of yesterday’s post, here’s some optical illusion nostalgia to get your ‘90’s flashbacks flowing: Magic Eye. 
As many of you will remember, Magic Eye books flourished around the late 90’s and contained a collection of patterns (in technical language, know as “random-dot autostereograms”), which, when looked at with the proper technique, would reveal a secret 3D image. 
In my recollection, this technique involved something along the lines of staring off into the distance of the page and resisting the urge to blink. Another method I remember required you to begin with your nose against the page and to then slowly pull the book away from your face.
Apparently, the magic behind Magic Eye is that “the images have a horizontally repeating pattern which differs slightly with each repetition, therefore giving the illusion of depth when each eye focuses on a different part of the pattern”.
The explanation sounds so simple now. In the heat of the Magic Eye Moment, though, it really felt like we were on the brink of time-travel, or something. The Millenium was coming, after all. TLC was walking on the ceiling in their "No Scrubs" music video, and it was a BIG DEAL. The cool kids were wearing all-silver. 
Magic Eye holds this same aesthetic. I feel the anticipation of Y2K when I look at these pixelated aquariums and rosebeds, and I love it. 
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
Magic Eye
Building off of yesterday’s post, here’s some optical illusion nostalgia to get your ‘90’s flashbacks flowing: Magic Eye. 
As many of you will remember, Magic Eye books flourished around the late 90’s and contained a collection of patterns (in technical language, know as “random-dot autostereograms”), which, when looked at with the proper technique, would reveal a secret 3D image. 
In my recollection, this technique involved something along the lines of staring off into the distance of the page and resisting the urge to blink. Another method I remember required you to begin with your nose against the page and to then slowly pull the book away from your face.
Apparently, the magic behind Magic Eye is that “the images have a horizontally repeating pattern which differs slightly with each repetition, therefore giving the illusion of depth when each eye focuses on a different part of the pattern”.
The explanation sounds so simple now. In the heat of the Magic Eye Moment, though, it really felt like we were on the brink of time-travel, or something. The Millenium was coming, after all. TLC was walking on the ceiling in their "No Scrubs" music video, and it was a BIG DEAL. The cool kids were wearing all-silver. 
Magic Eye holds this same aesthetic. I feel the anticipation of Y2K when I look at these pixelated aquariums and rosebeds, and I love it. 
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti
Magic Eye
Building off of yesterday’s post, here’s some optical illusion nostalgia to get your ‘90’s flashbacks flowing: Magic Eye. 
As many of you will remember, Magic Eye books flourished around the late 90’s and contained a collection of patterns (in technical language, know as “random-dot autostereograms”), which, when looked at with the proper technique, would reveal a secret 3D image. 
In my recollection, this technique involved something along the lines of staring off into the distance of the page and resisting the urge to blink. Another method I remember required you to begin with your nose against the page and to then slowly pull the book away from your face.
Apparently, the magic behind Magic Eye is that “the images have a horizontally repeating pattern which differs slightly with each repetition, therefore giving the illusion of depth when each eye focuses on a different part of the pattern”.
The explanation sounds so simple now. In the heat of the Magic Eye Moment, though, it really felt like we were on the brink of time-travel, or something. The Millenium was coming, after all. TLC was walking on the ceiling in their "No Scrubs" music video, and it was a BIG DEAL. The cool kids were wearing all-silver. 
Magic Eye holds this same aesthetic. I feel the anticipation of Y2K when I look at these pixelated aquariums and rosebeds, and I love it. 
- Melissa Daly-Buajitti

Magic Eye

Building off of yesterday’s post, here’s some optical illusion nostalgia to get your ‘90’s flashbacks flowing: Magic Eye

As many of you will remember, Magic Eye books flourished around the late 90’s and contained a collection of patterns (in technical language, know as “random-dot autostereograms”), which, when looked at with the proper technique, would reveal a secret 3D image. 

In my recollection, this technique involved something along the lines of staring off into the distance of the page and resisting the urge to blink. Another method I remember required you to begin with your nose against the page and to then slowly pull the book away from your face.

Apparently, the magic behind Magic Eye is that “the images have a horizontally repeating pattern which differs slightly with each repetition, therefore giving the illusion of depth when each eye focuses on a different part of the pattern”.

The explanation sounds so simple now. In the heat of the Magic Eye Moment, though, it really felt like we were on the brink of time-travel, or something. The Millenium was coming, after all. TLC was walking on the ceiling in their "No Scrubs" music video, and it was a BIG DEAL. The cool kids were wearing all-silver. 

Magic Eye holds this same aesthetic. I feel the anticipation of Y2K when I look at these pixelated aquariums and rosebeds, and I love it. 

- Melissa Daly-Buajitti

5 Photos
/ magic eye optical illusion science art artscience 90s books Y2K TLC no scrubs millenium

Contact Us

For submissions: please send images and a detailed description to our editor, Lee Jones, at leejones@artandsciencejournal.com.
Thank you and have a lovely day!