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BUZZ: Insects As Art
Insects may be pests, but they are important not only for our environment, but also great inspirations for artistic expressions.
A few months ago there was an exhibit at Ottawa’s Gallery 101 called BUZZ: Getting to Know Other Animals, curated by Laura Margita, which explored insects as both specimen and art, featuring the works of Kimberly Edgar, Deborah Margo, Bioni Samp, and Amy Swartz, with borrowed specimens from the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes (CNC).
Thorough research and creative expression came together, juxtaposing scientific names and species groups with artistic titles and aesthetical organization.
Kimberly Edgar’s work was used to tell a story through her drawings, which as she stated “forces her to analyze them aesthetically, so that she is no longer thinking about them fearfully, but learning to appreciate them as beautiful and interesting; and that drawing them allows her to cross that fine line between revulsion and fascination”.
The work of Deborah Margo created a garden in the gallery space as a form of experiment, where the work “[stimulated] bodies and minds by combining creative experimentation, ecological sustainability, and nourishment for two specific animal species: bees and cultural workers”. Working specifically with those two entities in mind created a piece which formed a dialogue between social and ecological systems.
Bioni Samp performed at the Canadian Museum of Nature, where he exhibited his DJ-skills combining music and bee frequencies, to raise awareness on the plight of bees.
Amy Swartz created intricate installations, similar to the display cases on loan from the CNC, which “[explored] the idea of obsession — not only in the practice of art, but also in humanity’s perceived control over nature, life, and death”. Juxtaposing her specimens with the ones from the CNC was deliberate, to make one “consider how the gaze of the scientist and the gaze of the artist may differ in regards to the animals they are studying”.
In general, the exhibit was not about getting over phobias of ‘creepy’ insects or merely admiring their natural patterns and colours, but about remembering the importance of even the smallest of organisms to our environment. It was a wake-up call to protect Canada’s biodiversity, celebrating the beauty and importance of these little creatures.
-Anna Paluch
BUZZ: Insects As Art
Insects may be pests, but they are important not only for our environment, but also great inspirations for artistic expressions.
A few months ago there was an exhibit at Ottawa’s Gallery 101 called BUZZ: Getting to Know Other Animals, curated by Laura Margita, which explored insects as both specimen and art, featuring the works of Kimberly Edgar, Deborah Margo, Bioni Samp, and Amy Swartz, with borrowed specimens from the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes (CNC).
Thorough research and creative expression came together, juxtaposing scientific names and species groups with artistic titles and aesthetical organization.
Kimberly Edgar’s work was used to tell a story through her drawings, which as she stated “forces her to analyze them aesthetically, so that she is no longer thinking about them fearfully, but learning to appreciate them as beautiful and interesting; and that drawing them allows her to cross that fine line between revulsion and fascination”.
The work of Deborah Margo created a garden in the gallery space as a form of experiment, where the work “[stimulated] bodies and minds by combining creative experimentation, ecological sustainability, and nourishment for two specific animal species: bees and cultural workers”. Working specifically with those two entities in mind created a piece which formed a dialogue between social and ecological systems.
Bioni Samp performed at the Canadian Museum of Nature, where he exhibited his DJ-skills combining music and bee frequencies, to raise awareness on the plight of bees.
Amy Swartz created intricate installations, similar to the display cases on loan from the CNC, which “[explored] the idea of obsession — not only in the practice of art, but also in humanity’s perceived control over nature, life, and death”. Juxtaposing her specimens with the ones from the CNC was deliberate, to make one “consider how the gaze of the scientist and the gaze of the artist may differ in regards to the animals they are studying”.
In general, the exhibit was not about getting over phobias of ‘creepy’ insects or merely admiring their natural patterns and colours, but about remembering the importance of even the smallest of organisms to our environment. It was a wake-up call to protect Canada’s biodiversity, celebrating the beauty and importance of these little creatures.
-Anna Paluch
BUZZ: Insects As Art
Insects may be pests, but they are important not only for our environment, but also great inspirations for artistic expressions.
A few months ago there was an exhibit at Ottawa’s Gallery 101 called BUZZ: Getting to Know Other Animals, curated by Laura Margita, which explored insects as both specimen and art, featuring the works of Kimberly Edgar, Deborah Margo, Bioni Samp, and Amy Swartz, with borrowed specimens from the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes (CNC).
Thorough research and creative expression came together, juxtaposing scientific names and species groups with artistic titles and aesthetical organization.
Kimberly Edgar’s work was used to tell a story through her drawings, which as she stated “forces her to analyze them aesthetically, so that she is no longer thinking about them fearfully, but learning to appreciate them as beautiful and interesting; and that drawing them allows her to cross that fine line between revulsion and fascination”.
The work of Deborah Margo created a garden in the gallery space as a form of experiment, where the work “[stimulated] bodies and minds by combining creative experimentation, ecological sustainability, and nourishment for two specific animal species: bees and cultural workers”. Working specifically with those two entities in mind created a piece which formed a dialogue between social and ecological systems.
Bioni Samp performed at the Canadian Museum of Nature, where he exhibited his DJ-skills combining music and bee frequencies, to raise awareness on the plight of bees.
Amy Swartz created intricate installations, similar to the display cases on loan from the CNC, which “[explored] the idea of obsession — not only in the practice of art, but also in humanity’s perceived control over nature, life, and death”. Juxtaposing her specimens with the ones from the CNC was deliberate, to make one “consider how the gaze of the scientist and the gaze of the artist may differ in regards to the animals they are studying”.
In general, the exhibit was not about getting over phobias of ‘creepy’ insects or merely admiring their natural patterns and colours, but about remembering the importance of even the smallest of organisms to our environment. It was a wake-up call to protect Canada’s biodiversity, celebrating the beauty and importance of these little creatures.
-Anna Paluch

BUZZ: Insects As Art

Insects may be pests, but they are important not only for our environment, but also great inspirations for artistic expressions.

A few months ago there was an exhibit at Ottawa’s Gallery 101 called BUZZ: Getting to Know Other Animals, curated by Laura Margita, which explored insects as both specimen and art, featuring the works of Kimberly Edgar, Deborah Margo, Bioni Samp, and Amy Swartz, with borrowed specimens from the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes (CNC).

Thorough research and creative expression came together, juxtaposing scientific names and species groups with artistic titles and aesthetical organization.

Kimberly Edgar’s work was used to tell a story through her drawings, which as she stated “forces her to analyze them aesthetically, so that she is no longer thinking about them fearfully, but learning to appreciate them as beautiful and interesting; and that drawing them allows her to cross that fine line between revulsion and fascination”.

The work of Deborah Margo created a garden in the gallery space as a form of experiment, where the work “[stimulated] bodies and minds by combining creative experimentation, ecological sustainability, and nourishment for two specific animal species: bees and cultural workers”. Working specifically with those two entities in mind created a piece which formed a dialogue between social and ecological systems.

Bioni Samp performed at the Canadian Museum of Nature, where he exhibited his DJ-skills combining music and bee frequencies, to raise awareness on the plight of bees.

Amy Swartz created intricate installations, similar to the display cases on loan from the CNC, which “[explored] the idea of obsession — not only in the practice of art, but also in humanity’s perceived control over nature, life, and death”. Juxtaposing her specimens with the ones from the CNC was deliberate, to make one “consider how the gaze of the scientist and the gaze of the artist may differ in regards to the animals they are studying”.

In general, the exhibit was not about getting over phobias of ‘creepy’ insects or merely admiring their natural patterns and colours, but about remembering the importance of even the smallest of organisms to our environment. It was a wake-up call to protect Canada’s biodiversity, celebrating the beauty and importance of these little creatures.

-Anna Paluch

3 Photos
/ anna paluch deborah margo bioni samp laura margita gallery 101 ottawa ottawa art BUZZ kimberly edgar amy swartz Canadian National Collection of Insects insects bees art science art and science journal Environment ecology biodiversity
Local Coverage - PUSH: The New Printmakers
Contemporary printmaking practices live in an in-between space. As a medium, it is caught between its history and its relevance as a mode of expression. Printmaking is often thought of as a dying art, sometimes involving complicated processes and machinery that are no longer being manufactured. But, the relevance of printmaking as an art form is still present, as is shown by a new printmaking exhibition being held at Studio Sixty Six in Ottawa.

PUSH: The New Printmakers brings together several artists specializing in different types of printmaking. The works are comprised of linocuts, screen printing, woodcuts and relief prints.The artists included in the show are Melissa Blackman, Delphine Sullivan, Dante Penman, Claudia Gutierrez, Tegan Alston, Stéphanie St-Jean Aubre and Kimberly Edgar, all graduates from the Ottawa School of Art. While all the works are tied together by their medium and their black and white palette, each artist’s oeuvre addresses different artistic preoccupations, ranging from issues of identity, the idea of the specimen, to the relationship between landmarks and memory. 

For those who are interested in checking out the show, it will be open until June 26th. Click here for more information.
If you are interested in seeing interviews with the artists and gallery owner, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Local Coverage - PUSH: The New Printmakers
Contemporary printmaking practices live in an in-between space. As a medium, it is caught between its history and its relevance as a mode of expression. Printmaking is often thought of as a dying art, sometimes involving complicated processes and machinery that are no longer being manufactured. But, the relevance of printmaking as an art form is still present, as is shown by a new printmaking exhibition being held at Studio Sixty Six in Ottawa.

PUSH: The New Printmakers brings together several artists specializing in different types of printmaking. The works are comprised of linocuts, screen printing, woodcuts and relief prints.The artists included in the show are Melissa Blackman, Delphine Sullivan, Dante Penman, Claudia Gutierrez, Tegan Alston, Stéphanie St-Jean Aubre and Kimberly Edgar, all graduates from the Ottawa School of Art. While all the works are tied together by their medium and their black and white palette, each artist’s oeuvre addresses different artistic preoccupations, ranging from issues of identity, the idea of the specimen, to the relationship between landmarks and memory. 

For those who are interested in checking out the show, it will be open until June 26th. Click here for more information.
If you are interested in seeing interviews with the artists and gallery owner, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Local Coverage - PUSH: The New Printmakers
Contemporary printmaking practices live in an in-between space. As a medium, it is caught between its history and its relevance as a mode of expression. Printmaking is often thought of as a dying art, sometimes involving complicated processes and machinery that are no longer being manufactured. But, the relevance of printmaking as an art form is still present, as is shown by a new printmaking exhibition being held at Studio Sixty Six in Ottawa.

PUSH: The New Printmakers brings together several artists specializing in different types of printmaking. The works are comprised of linocuts, screen printing, woodcuts and relief prints.The artists included in the show are Melissa Blackman, Delphine Sullivan, Dante Penman, Claudia Gutierrez, Tegan Alston, Stéphanie St-Jean Aubre and Kimberly Edgar, all graduates from the Ottawa School of Art. While all the works are tied together by their medium and their black and white palette, each artist’s oeuvre addresses different artistic preoccupations, ranging from issues of identity, the idea of the specimen, to the relationship between landmarks and memory. 

For those who are interested in checking out the show, it will be open until June 26th. Click here for more information.
If you are interested in seeing interviews with the artists and gallery owner, click here.
-Lea Hamilton
Local Coverage - PUSH: The New Printmakers
Contemporary printmaking practices live in an in-between space. As a medium, it is caught between its history and its relevance as a mode of expression. Printmaking is often thought of as a dying art, sometimes involving complicated processes and machinery that are no longer being manufactured. But, the relevance of printmaking as an art form is still present, as is shown by a new printmaking exhibition being held at Studio Sixty Six in Ottawa.

PUSH: The New Printmakers brings together several artists specializing in different types of printmaking. The works are comprised of linocuts, screen printing, woodcuts and relief prints.The artists included in the show are Melissa Blackman, Delphine Sullivan, Dante Penman, Claudia Gutierrez, Tegan Alston, Stéphanie St-Jean Aubre and Kimberly Edgar, all graduates from the Ottawa School of Art. While all the works are tied together by their medium and their black and white palette, each artist’s oeuvre addresses different artistic preoccupations, ranging from issues of identity, the idea of the specimen, to the relationship between landmarks and memory. 

For those who are interested in checking out the show, it will be open until June 26th. Click here for more information.
If you are interested in seeing interviews with the artists and gallery owner, click here.
-Lea Hamilton

Andrew O’Malley’s Light Sculptures

Some artists may find it difficult to create works that truly engage an audience, but Ottawa artist Andrew O’Malley is not one of them. His lighting works are playful and entertaining, combining finely crafted cases, hand-built electronics, and custom programming to create pieces that evolve in front of our eyes; like ‘living’, electronic sculptures.

The artist is fascinated with the rules of programming, and how even something structured can create random results. A light box may be programmed to change colours at certain times periods, but the fun part is seeing what colours the program will choose. It helps too that the artist studied electrical engineering, allowing him to have the knowledge behind the science in order to express programs and circuits creatively through art. 

One of Andrew’s pieces, Electric Window 4 (2009), uses sixteen LED lights to create gradient effects between light intensities, as well as transitions and patterns. The work is always changing; instead of having people stare at the same image, different viewers see a different art piece. The pattern that one person saw first, is different to what another person will see first, and this dynamic art piece allows for diverse conversation and understanding of the art.

If you would like to see some of Andrew’s pieces in person, he is represented by Cube Gallery in Ottawa, where they not only have a collection of his light boxes, but also a DOTKLOK (2010)!

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

andrew o'malleyanna paluchlightlight boxeselectronicslocalOttawaCube Galleryartscienceart and science journalsculpture
The Enchanted Labyrinth
The Enchanted Labyrinth, part of an on-going collaboration between visual artist Barbara Brown and musicians, aims to create a sense of connection with the environment. The work does so by creating a sanctuary within an urban yet natural setting. 
A series of circles will create a labyrinth path in the middle of the city. As Brown states of the work, “the path is illuminated and invites participants to enter and walk comtemplatively to the centre of the space, where they encounter a quiet oasis at the vortex of urban life.” The installation will include music by composer Bruce Nicol and vocalist Antonia Pigot, whose sounds will echo and encourage participants to go deeper into the labyrinth. 
To enter the labyrinth yourself, you can see this installation at Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau this weekend. 
- Lee Jones
The Enchanted Labyrinth
The Enchanted Labyrinth, part of an on-going collaboration between visual artist Barbara Brown and musicians, aims to create a sense of connection with the environment. The work does so by creating a sanctuary within an urban yet natural setting. 
A series of circles will create a labyrinth path in the middle of the city. As Brown states of the work, “the path is illuminated and invites participants to enter and walk comtemplatively to the centre of the space, where they encounter a quiet oasis at the vortex of urban life.” The installation will include music by composer Bruce Nicol and vocalist Antonia Pigot, whose sounds will echo and encourage participants to go deeper into the labyrinth. 
To enter the labyrinth yourself, you can see this installation at Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau this weekend. 
- Lee Jones
The Enchanted Labyrinth
The Enchanted Labyrinth, part of an on-going collaboration between visual artist Barbara Brown and musicians, aims to create a sense of connection with the environment. The work does so by creating a sanctuary within an urban yet natural setting. 
A series of circles will create a labyrinth path in the middle of the city. As Brown states of the work, “the path is illuminated and invites participants to enter and walk comtemplatively to the centre of the space, where they encounter a quiet oasis at the vortex of urban life.” The installation will include music by composer Bruce Nicol and vocalist Antonia Pigot, whose sounds will echo and encourage participants to go deeper into the labyrinth. 
To enter the labyrinth yourself, you can see this installation at Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau this weekend. 
- Lee Jones
Neon Forestation by O-Town Bombers
At night, nothing is more ignored than trees. For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, O-Town Bombers are going to change all that by bringing trees out of the shadows. For this project the group will be covering 18 trees with neon crochet. Using neon colours and glowing wire woven into the fabric, the team will light up the night forest from Sussex to the Clarendon Courtyard. 
The O-Town Bombers group began with last years Nuit Blanche when artist Justy Dennis wanted to cover a bus in crochet. The group has since grown to over 22 members who all seek to liven up the city while also giving back. The yarn used for each installation doesn’t go to waste. As Dennis states, “With each torn down installation, blankets are made and distributed to High Jinx, a local business that provides social assistance to the vulnerable in our community.”
- Lee Jones

Neon Forestation by O-Town Bombers

At night, nothing is more ignored than trees. For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, O-Town Bombers are going to change all that by bringing trees out of the shadows. For this project the group will be covering 18 trees with neon crochet. Using neon colours and glowing wire woven into the fabric, the team will light up the night forest from Sussex to the Clarendon Courtyard. 

The O-Town Bombers group began with last years Nuit Blanche when artist Justy Dennis wanted to cover a bus in crochet. The group has since grown to over 22 members who all seek to liven up the city while also giving back. The yarn used for each installation doesn’t go to waste. As Dennis states, “With each torn down installation, blankets are made and distributed to High Jinx, a local business that provides social assistance to the vulnerable in our community.”

- Lee Jones

ottawa nuit blanche ottawa gatineau o-town bombers crochet neon forestation Justy Dennis
The Birth and Death of Stars by Sanjeev Sivarulrasa
For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, Sanjeev Sivarulrasa will be showing his installation of six long-exposure astro-photographic works printed on aluminum. These images will depict star-birth and star-death regions of the night sky.
The images are from Sivarulrasa’s visits to Eastern Ontario. As he describes leaving the city: “For me, the pristine night sky is a meditative space that engages the senses and the mind. In cities, the night sky appears bland and almost featureless – most people don’t even bother to look up. That’s the reality of living under light pollution. By driving an hour or more away from the city lights of Ottawa, I get to see a panorama of stars from horizon to horizon, which invites observation and awareness.”
In his works, Sivalrurasa is interested in the subjective experience rather than the presumed objective reality. His tools are a telescope, lenses, oculars and a digital camera, but he captures his images over several hours, or sometimes even several nights, and then combines the images digitally in his studio to create the final composite work.
For Nuit Blanche on September 21st, his works will be on display at the Fritizi Gallery on Wellington Street.
- Lee Jones
The Birth and Death of Stars by Sanjeev Sivarulrasa
For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, Sanjeev Sivarulrasa will be showing his installation of six long-exposure astro-photographic works printed on aluminum. These images will depict star-birth and star-death regions of the night sky.
The images are from Sivarulrasa’s visits to Eastern Ontario. As he describes leaving the city: “For me, the pristine night sky is a meditative space that engages the senses and the mind. In cities, the night sky appears bland and almost featureless – most people don’t even bother to look up. That’s the reality of living under light pollution. By driving an hour or more away from the city lights of Ottawa, I get to see a panorama of stars from horizon to horizon, which invites observation and awareness.”
In his works, Sivalrurasa is interested in the subjective experience rather than the presumed objective reality. His tools are a telescope, lenses, oculars and a digital camera, but he captures his images over several hours, or sometimes even several nights, and then combines the images digitally in his studio to create the final composite work.
For Nuit Blanche on September 21st, his works will be on display at the Fritizi Gallery on Wellington Street.
- Lee Jones

The Birth and Death of Stars by Sanjeev Sivarulrasa

For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, Sanjeev Sivarulrasa will be showing his installation of six long-exposure astro-photographic works printed on aluminum. These images will depict star-birth and star-death regions of the night sky.

The images are from Sivarulrasa’s visits to Eastern Ontario. As he describes leaving the city: “For me, the pristine night sky is a meditative space that engages the senses and the mind. In cities, the night sky appears bland and almost featureless – most people don’t even bother to look up. That’s the reality of living under light pollution. By driving an hour or more away from the city lights of Ottawa, I get to see a panorama of stars from horizon to horizon, which invites observation and awareness.”

In his works, Sivalrurasa is interested in the subjective experience rather than the presumed objective reality. His tools are a telescope, lenses, oculars and a digital camera, but he captures his images over several hours, or sometimes even several nights, and then combines the images digitally in his studio to create the final composite work.

For Nuit Blanche on September 21st, his works will be on display at the Fritizi Gallery on Wellington Street.

- Lee Jones

2 Photos
/ ottawa art nuit blanche ottawa gatineau sanjeev sivarulrasa astronomy photography
Anthony Scavarelli’s “Self-Reflection”
Technology is often characterized as cold and lonely, but when done right the thing we see as so un-human can actually have the opposite effect. In his work the artist Anthony Scavarelli, who completed his masters in Human-Computer Interaction at Carleton University, uses technology to explore human emotional response and attachment.
For Nuit Blanche Ottawa and Gatineau, an all night event on September 21st, Scavarelli will be presenting “Self-Reflection”. The work is an experiment in affective touch, which is touch that elicits an emotional reaction or connection. In the installation audience members will touch a structure covered in soft fabric. The silhouette of a small child will react to the viewer with happiness, anger, sadness or indifference depending on how they touch the artwork.
“I have always been fascinated by the concept of an inner or forgotten child,” said Scavarelli. “When we were children we had so many dreams, and into adulthood we have either done that child proud, forgotten them, or possibly failed them. By allowing a simple method for us to interact with this child in a more literal sense, I hope to build an emotional connection between the child silhouette and the viewer.”
Scavarelli views this work as an experiment in self-discovery. As he questions, “Does the audience’s interaction with the child silhouette possibly become a reflection of how they view themselves?”
The structure will be made with some help from Henri Kuschkowitz, who with Scavarelli forms the artistic group, the Luminartists. The group is known for developing interactive installations in public spaces that aim to visualize messages, but also draw the audience to become part of the experience. Scavarelli has a history of impressive installations throughout Ottawa (with one even going up at Art & Science Journal’s summer residence - Invest Ottawa), so “Self-Reflections” will no doubt be an exciting addition to the Nuit Blanche lineup. 
- Lee Jones
Anthony Scavarelli’s “Self-Reflection”
Technology is often characterized as cold and lonely, but when done right the thing we see as so un-human can actually have the opposite effect. In his work the artist Anthony Scavarelli, who completed his masters in Human-Computer Interaction at Carleton University, uses technology to explore human emotional response and attachment.
For Nuit Blanche Ottawa and Gatineau, an all night event on September 21st, Scavarelli will be presenting “Self-Reflection”. The work is an experiment in affective touch, which is touch that elicits an emotional reaction or connection. In the installation audience members will touch a structure covered in soft fabric. The silhouette of a small child will react to the viewer with happiness, anger, sadness or indifference depending on how they touch the artwork.
“I have always been fascinated by the concept of an inner or forgotten child,” said Scavarelli. “When we were children we had so many dreams, and into adulthood we have either done that child proud, forgotten them, or possibly failed them. By allowing a simple method for us to interact with this child in a more literal sense, I hope to build an emotional connection between the child silhouette and the viewer.”
Scavarelli views this work as an experiment in self-discovery. As he questions, “Does the audience’s interaction with the child silhouette possibly become a reflection of how they view themselves?”
The structure will be made with some help from Henri Kuschkowitz, who with Scavarelli forms the artistic group, the Luminartists. The group is known for developing interactive installations in public spaces that aim to visualize messages, but also draw the audience to become part of the experience. Scavarelli has a history of impressive installations throughout Ottawa (with one even going up at Art & Science Journal’s summer residence - Invest Ottawa), so “Self-Reflections” will no doubt be an exciting addition to the Nuit Blanche lineup. 
- Lee Jones

Anthony Scavarelli’s “Self-Reflection”

Technology is often characterized as cold and lonely, but when done right the thing we see as so un-human can actually have the opposite effect. In his work the artist Anthony Scavarelli, who completed his masters in Human-Computer Interaction at Carleton University, uses technology to explore human emotional response and attachment.

For Nuit Blanche Ottawa and Gatineau, an all night event on September 21st, Scavarelli will be presenting “Self-Reflection”. The work is an experiment in affective touch, which is touch that elicits an emotional reaction or connection. In the installation audience members will touch a structure covered in soft fabric. The silhouette of a small child will react to the viewer with happiness, anger, sadness or indifference depending on how they touch the artwork.

“I have always been fascinated by the concept of an inner or forgotten child,” said Scavarelli. “When we were children we had so many dreams, and into adulthood we have either done that child proud, forgotten them, or possibly failed them. By allowing a simple method for us to interact with this child in a more literal sense, I hope to build an emotional connection between the child silhouette and the viewer.”

Scavarelli views this work as an experiment in self-discovery. As he questions, “Does the audience’s interaction with the child silhouette possibly become a reflection of how they view themselves?”

The structure will be made with some help from Henri Kuschkowitz, who with Scavarelli forms the artistic group, the Luminartists. The group is known for developing interactive installations in public spaces that aim to visualize messages, but also draw the audience to become part of the experience. Scavarelli has a history of impressive installations throughout Ottawa (with one even going up at Art & Science Journal’s summer residence - Invest Ottawa), so “Self-Reflections” will no doubt be an exciting addition to the Nuit Blanche lineup. 

- Lee Jones

2 Photos
/ art and science technology ottawa nuit blanche anthony scavarelli lee jones
99 Red Beacons by Britta Evans-Fenton
Today’s widespread use of the Internet and evolving forms of digital and social media has allowed us to be constantly plugged into our various communicative devices. This dependence on the web has essentially blurred the lines between the individual and the collective. As our devices allow us to become digital beacons, we shed our anonymity and remain in constant contact with the world around us.
Where would we be without the Internet?
With many of these issues in mind, Ottawa-based artist Britta Evans-Fenton (who we have featured on our blog before) has proposed an installation/performance piece that highlights the ubiquity of digital communication and sheds light on the unusual history of the Internet. The installation will be part of this year’s installment of Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau. 
Britta’s inspiration for this project comes from the German Cold War protest song, “99 Luftballons” by Nena. As Britta discovered in her research, the technology that has developed into the World Wide Web was originally developed through Cold War military funding. The song references the military’s influence over lines of communication and comments on the paranoia and hysteria associated with war.
99 Red Beacons is a roaming installation featuring 99 blinking red balloons. Volunteers will carry the balloons around the city as they emit anonymous Morse code messages written by members of the Canadian Armed Forces. The physical presence of the balloons, gliding in the air, is likened to the image of the millions of messages that “float” through the air as they travel between phones, computers, tablets, and e-readers. In this sense, the balloons serve as a reminder of the prevalence of digital messaging, while the messages written by Canadian soldiers refer to the Internet’s origins as a military-funded form of communication.
Look for 99 Red Beacons on September 21, 2013 during Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau!
- Victoria Nolte
99 Red Beacons by Britta Evans-Fenton
Today’s widespread use of the Internet and evolving forms of digital and social media has allowed us to be constantly plugged into our various communicative devices. This dependence on the web has essentially blurred the lines between the individual and the collective. As our devices allow us to become digital beacons, we shed our anonymity and remain in constant contact with the world around us.
Where would we be without the Internet?
With many of these issues in mind, Ottawa-based artist Britta Evans-Fenton (who we have featured on our blog before) has proposed an installation/performance piece that highlights the ubiquity of digital communication and sheds light on the unusual history of the Internet. The installation will be part of this year’s installment of Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau. 
Britta’s inspiration for this project comes from the German Cold War protest song, “99 Luftballons” by Nena. As Britta discovered in her research, the technology that has developed into the World Wide Web was originally developed through Cold War military funding. The song references the military’s influence over lines of communication and comments on the paranoia and hysteria associated with war.
99 Red Beacons is a roaming installation featuring 99 blinking red balloons. Volunteers will carry the balloons around the city as they emit anonymous Morse code messages written by members of the Canadian Armed Forces. The physical presence of the balloons, gliding in the air, is likened to the image of the millions of messages that “float” through the air as they travel between phones, computers, tablets, and e-readers. In this sense, the balloons serve as a reminder of the prevalence of digital messaging, while the messages written by Canadian soldiers refer to the Internet’s origins as a military-funded form of communication.
Look for 99 Red Beacons on September 21, 2013 during Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau!
- Victoria Nolte

99 Red Beacons by Britta Evans-Fenton

Today’s widespread use of the Internet and evolving forms of digital and social media has allowed us to be constantly plugged into our various communicative devices. This dependence on the web has essentially blurred the lines between the individual and the collective. As our devices allow us to become digital beacons, we shed our anonymity and remain in constant contact with the world around us.

Where would we be without the Internet?

With many of these issues in mind, Ottawa-based artist Britta Evans-Fenton (who we have featured on our blog before) has proposed an installation/performance piece that highlights the ubiquity of digital communication and sheds light on the unusual history of the Internet. The installation will be part of this year’s installment of Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau.

Britta’s inspiration for this project comes from the German Cold War protest song, “99 Luftballons” by Nena. As Britta discovered in her research, the technology that has developed into the World Wide Web was originally developed through Cold War military funding. The song references the military’s influence over lines of communication and comments on the paranoia and hysteria associated with war.

99 Red Beacons is a roaming installation featuring 99 blinking red balloons. Volunteers will carry the balloons around the city as they emit anonymous Morse code messages written by members of the Canadian Armed Forces. The physical presence of the balloons, gliding in the air, is likened to the image of the millions of messages that “float” through the air as they travel between phones, computers, tablets, and e-readers. In this sense, the balloons serve as a reminder of the prevalence of digital messaging, while the messages written by Canadian soldiers refer to the Internet’s origins as a military-funded form of communication.

Look for 99 Red Beacons on September 21, 2013 during Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau!

- Victoria Nolte

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Karina Bergmans’s Ligaments and Ligatures 
This past week Karina Bergmans’s Ligaments and Ligatures opened at City Hall Gallery in Ottawa. Bergmans is a multi-diciplinary artist who in the past has worked on sculptures, public art installations and public interventions. In this series, the artist used reclaimed textiles to create literal interpretations of critical illnesses. Her works include elements of comedy—bright colours, visual puns— and the use of fabric reminds one of stuffed toys and pillows. By using these materials, Bergmans allows us to see and contemplate illnesses and infections without being repelled. Overall, the series is a great way to bring health issues back into public awareness. 
Visit the exhibit at the City Hall Gallery in Ottawa until July 28th, and for more information click here. 
- Lee Jones
Karina Bergmans’s Ligaments and Ligatures 
This past week Karina Bergmans’s Ligaments and Ligatures opened at City Hall Gallery in Ottawa. Bergmans is a multi-diciplinary artist who in the past has worked on sculptures, public art installations and public interventions. In this series, the artist used reclaimed textiles to create literal interpretations of critical illnesses. Her works include elements of comedy—bright colours, visual puns— and the use of fabric reminds one of stuffed toys and pillows. By using these materials, Bergmans allows us to see and contemplate illnesses and infections without being repelled. Overall, the series is a great way to bring health issues back into public awareness. 
Visit the exhibit at the City Hall Gallery in Ottawa until July 28th, and for more information click here. 
- Lee Jones
Karina Bergmans’s Ligaments and Ligatures 
This past week Karina Bergmans’s Ligaments and Ligatures opened at City Hall Gallery in Ottawa. Bergmans is a multi-diciplinary artist who in the past has worked on sculptures, public art installations and public interventions. In this series, the artist used reclaimed textiles to create literal interpretations of critical illnesses. Her works include elements of comedy—bright colours, visual puns— and the use of fabric reminds one of stuffed toys and pillows. By using these materials, Bergmans allows us to see and contemplate illnesses and infections without being repelled. Overall, the series is a great way to bring health issues back into public awareness. 
Visit the exhibit at the City Hall Gallery in Ottawa until July 28th, and for more information click here. 
- Lee Jones

Call for Interns

Art & Science Journal is currently accepting applications for summer Content Interns in our new office space in Ottawa. Driven by a talented team of Staff Writers and Contributors, Art & Science Journal is a biannual publication and website focused on art works concerned with science, nature, and technology. Our mission is to promote, explore, and inspire the wonder that occurs when art and science collide. We strive to be an informative and engaging resource for educators, students, and artscience enthusiasts alike.  Our 2 Content Interns will be crucial contributors to a very exciting Art & Science Journal project launching in September 2013.  Intern Responsibilities:  - Research and develop content for the aforementioned Art & Science Journal project.  - Fact check and proofread content for the Project. - Participate in editorial development and attend regular Staff Meetings.  - Write a weekly column on artandsciencejournal.com - Offer editorial support to the Editor-in-Chief and Project Manager.  - Text based social media participation.  Our Interns will be expected to devote a minimum of 10 hours per week to the Project, 5 of which will be completed in the office in collaboration with the Project Manager and Editor-in-Chief. The internship will run from June 3 - August 30, 2013.  This is an excellent opportunity for university and college students and recent graduates in the Ottawa-Gatineau region to gain valuable editorial and research experience and be part of an exciting new project at Art & Science Journal. Our internships are unpaid, but students may arrange to complete the internship for course credit at their respected university or college.  To apply, please send your C.V. and two samples of written work (short articles, article pitches for Art & Science Journal, or class essays) to the Project Manager at victorianolte@artandsciencejournal.com. Samples should not exceed 1,000 words in length.  All applications are due by midnight on Tuesday May 7, 2013. Qualified applicants will be contacted for an interview, to be held the week of May 13 - 17.  Thank you for your interest in Art & Science Journal! Good luck! - Victoria Nolte (Source: artandsciencejournal.com)
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