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The Birth and Death of Stars by Sanjeev Sivarulrasa
For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, Sanjeev Sivarulrasa will be showing his installation of six long-exposure astro-photographic works printed on aluminum. These images will depict star-birth and star-death regions of the night sky.
The images are from Sivarulrasa’s visits to Eastern Ontario. As he describes leaving the city: “For me, the pristine night sky is a meditative space that engages the senses and the mind. In cities, the night sky appears bland and almost featureless – most people don’t even bother to look up. That’s the reality of living under light pollution. By driving an hour or more away from the city lights of Ottawa, I get to see a panorama of stars from horizon to horizon, which invites observation and awareness.”
In his works, Sivalrurasa is interested in the subjective experience rather than the presumed objective reality. His tools are a telescope, lenses, oculars and a digital camera, but he captures his images over several hours, or sometimes even several nights, and then combines the images digitally in his studio to create the final composite work.
For Nuit Blanche on September 21st, his works will be on display at the Fritizi Gallery on Wellington Street.
- Lee Jones
The Birth and Death of Stars by Sanjeev Sivarulrasa
For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, Sanjeev Sivarulrasa will be showing his installation of six long-exposure astro-photographic works printed on aluminum. These images will depict star-birth and star-death regions of the night sky.
The images are from Sivarulrasa’s visits to Eastern Ontario. As he describes leaving the city: “For me, the pristine night sky is a meditative space that engages the senses and the mind. In cities, the night sky appears bland and almost featureless – most people don’t even bother to look up. That’s the reality of living under light pollution. By driving an hour or more away from the city lights of Ottawa, I get to see a panorama of stars from horizon to horizon, which invites observation and awareness.”
In his works, Sivalrurasa is interested in the subjective experience rather than the presumed objective reality. His tools are a telescope, lenses, oculars and a digital camera, but he captures his images over several hours, or sometimes even several nights, and then combines the images digitally in his studio to create the final composite work.
For Nuit Blanche on September 21st, his works will be on display at the Fritizi Gallery on Wellington Street.
- Lee Jones

The Birth and Death of Stars by Sanjeev Sivarulrasa

For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, Sanjeev Sivarulrasa will be showing his installation of six long-exposure astro-photographic works printed on aluminum. These images will depict star-birth and star-death regions of the night sky.

The images are from Sivarulrasa’s visits to Eastern Ontario. As he describes leaving the city: “For me, the pristine night sky is a meditative space that engages the senses and the mind. In cities, the night sky appears bland and almost featureless – most people don’t even bother to look up. That’s the reality of living under light pollution. By driving an hour or more away from the city lights of Ottawa, I get to see a panorama of stars from horizon to horizon, which invites observation and awareness.”

In his works, Sivalrurasa is interested in the subjective experience rather than the presumed objective reality. His tools are a telescope, lenses, oculars and a digital camera, but he captures his images over several hours, or sometimes even several nights, and then combines the images digitally in his studio to create the final composite work.

For Nuit Blanche on September 21st, his works will be on display at the Fritizi Gallery on Wellington Street.

- Lee Jones

2 Photos
/ ottawa art nuit blanche ottawa gatineau sanjeev sivarulrasa astronomy photography
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders

Zach Nader’s Counterweight

There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 

Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 

In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:

Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.

   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 

See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 

- Erin Saunders

8 Photos
/ art science digital media photography photoshop family zach nader
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin

Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.

A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.

An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.

The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.

- Rob Echlin

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

9 Photos
/ art and science journal photography Edward Burtynsky burtynsky TIFF
Sterilisation
Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).
In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”
Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy. 
- Lee Jones
Sterilisation
Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).
In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”
Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy. 
- Lee Jones
Sterilisation
Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).
In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”
Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy. 
- Lee Jones
Sterilisation
Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).
In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”
Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy. 
- Lee Jones

Sterilisation

Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).

In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 

It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”

Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy

- Lee Jones

4 Photos
/ art photography science mitch payne lee jones sterilisation sterilization zena may hendrick gemma fletcher
Patrick Rochon’s Motion to Light
Extreme sports and art don’t usually go hand-in-hand, but photographer Patrick Rochon has found a way to counter that. The area of photography in which Rochon specializes is light-painting, which in itself is its own artistic genre. Setting the camera to a longer exposure time allows light-painters to create photographs that, you guessed it, look like they have been painted with light. The result is mesmerizing.
In Rochons’ Motion to Light series, he attached LED lights to wakeboards, and allowed the professional athletes the freedom to create their own compositions, as he snapped away on the shoreline. This was the first time the photographer had ever done such a project, but the experiment was a success.
Not only did the LED’s mimic large, vibrantly-coloured brushstrokes, but the reflection in the water added to the texture of the overall piece. Like seeing two different, traditional, art styles come together in one photograph, through an un-traditional method.
It seems that even sports and technology, are able to inspire creative works.
-Anna Paluch

Patrick Rochon’s Motion to Light


Extreme sports and art don’t usually go hand-in-hand, but photographer
Patrick Rochon has found a way to counter that. The area of photography in which Rochon specializes is light-painting, which in itself is its own artistic genre. Setting the camera to a longer exposure time allows light-painters to create photographs that, you guessed it, look like they have been painted with light. The result is mesmerizing.

In Rochons’ Motion to Light series, he attached LED lights to wakeboards, and allowed the professional athletes the freedom to create their own compositions, as he snapped away on the shoreline. This was the first time the photographer had ever done such a project, but the experiment was a success.

Not only did the LED’s mimic large, vibrantly-coloured brushstrokes, but the reflection in the water added to the texture of the overall piece. Like seeing two different, traditional, art styles come together in one photograph, through an un-traditional method.

It seems that even sports and technology, are able to inspire creative works.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

patrick rochon art science photography light painting sports wakeboarding anna paluch art and science journal
Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth
Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found imagery where there was none. At least, none of the imagery was deliberate. With our imagination, we humans often find symbols and meanings in ambiguous images. This psychological phenomenon, known as pareidolia, is the driving force behind Google Faces’s fascinating portraits of Earth.
Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, founders of the Berlin studio Onformative, were curious to see if a machine was capable of replicating pareidolia. The duo came across the idea while engaged in a different project using the same face recognition technology. In order to search for instances of pareidolia, a computer operates Google Maps while a robot uses an algorithm to detect faces on the Earth’s surface. With the aid of ofxBerkelium and a face tracking library made by Jason Saragih, Onformative’s Facetracker has produced a surprising number of viable images.
Onformative’s Facetracker has circled the planet several times and, although not all of its results produce obvious faces, the project has shown that machines are capable of replicating pareidolia.
To see more of Onformative’s landscape portraits, click here.
(Sources: Onformative/Fast Company/Wired

-Janine Truong
Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth
Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found imagery where there was none. At least, none of the imagery was deliberate. With our imagination, we humans often find symbols and meanings in ambiguous images. This psychological phenomenon, known as pareidolia, is the driving force behind Google Faces’s fascinating portraits of Earth.
Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, founders of the Berlin studio Onformative, were curious to see if a machine was capable of replicating pareidolia. The duo came across the idea while engaged in a different project using the same face recognition technology. In order to search for instances of pareidolia, a computer operates Google Maps while a robot uses an algorithm to detect faces on the Earth’s surface. With the aid of ofxBerkelium and a face tracking library made by Jason Saragih, Onformative’s Facetracker has produced a surprising number of viable images.
Onformative’s Facetracker has circled the planet several times and, although not all of its results produce obvious faces, the project has shown that machines are capable of replicating pareidolia.
To see more of Onformative’s landscape portraits, click here.
(Sources: Onformative/Fast Company/Wired

-Janine Truong
Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth
Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found imagery where there was none. At least, none of the imagery was deliberate. With our imagination, we humans often find symbols and meanings in ambiguous images. This psychological phenomenon, known as pareidolia, is the driving force behind Google Faces’s fascinating portraits of Earth.
Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, founders of the Berlin studio Onformative, were curious to see if a machine was capable of replicating pareidolia. The duo came across the idea while engaged in a different project using the same face recognition technology. In order to search for instances of pareidolia, a computer operates Google Maps while a robot uses an algorithm to detect faces on the Earth’s surface. With the aid of ofxBerkelium and a face tracking library made by Jason Saragih, Onformative’s Facetracker has produced a surprising number of viable images.
Onformative’s Facetracker has circled the planet several times and, although not all of its results produce obvious faces, the project has shown that machines are capable of replicating pareidolia.
To see more of Onformative’s landscape portraits, click here.
(Sources: Onformative/Fast Company/Wired

-Janine Truong
Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth
Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found imagery where there was none. At least, none of the imagery was deliberate. With our imagination, we humans often find symbols and meanings in ambiguous images. This psychological phenomenon, known as pareidolia, is the driving force behind Google Faces’s fascinating portraits of Earth.
Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, founders of the Berlin studio Onformative, were curious to see if a machine was capable of replicating pareidolia. The duo came across the idea while engaged in a different project using the same face recognition technology. In order to search for instances of pareidolia, a computer operates Google Maps while a robot uses an algorithm to detect faces on the Earth’s surface. With the aid of ofxBerkelium and a face tracking library made by Jason Saragih, Onformative’s Facetracker has produced a surprising number of viable images.
Onformative’s Facetracker has circled the planet several times and, although not all of its results produce obvious faces, the project has shown that machines are capable of replicating pareidolia.
To see more of Onformative’s landscape portraits, click here.
(Sources: Onformative/Fast Company/Wired

-Janine Truong
Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth
Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found imagery where there was none. At least, none of the imagery was deliberate. With our imagination, we humans often find symbols and meanings in ambiguous images. This psychological phenomenon, known as pareidolia, is the driving force behind Google Faces’s fascinating portraits of Earth.
Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, founders of the Berlin studio Onformative, were curious to see if a machine was capable of replicating pareidolia. The duo came across the idea while engaged in a different project using the same face recognition technology. In order to search for instances of pareidolia, a computer operates Google Maps while a robot uses an algorithm to detect faces on the Earth’s surface. With the aid of ofxBerkelium and a face tracking library made by Jason Saragih, Onformative’s Facetracker has produced a surprising number of viable images.
Onformative’s Facetracker has circled the planet several times and, although not all of its results produce obvious faces, the project has shown that machines are capable of replicating pareidolia.
To see more of Onformative’s landscape portraits, click here.
(Sources: Onformative/Fast Company/Wired

-Janine Truong

Google Faces: Portraits of the Earth

Stars, clouds, grilled cheese – these are all places where humans have found imagery where there was none. At least, none of the imagery was deliberate. With our imagination, we humans often find symbols and meanings in ambiguous images. This psychological phenomenon, known as pareidolia, is the driving force behind Google Faces’s fascinating portraits of Earth.

Julia Laub and Cedric Kiefer, founders of the Berlin studio Onformative, were curious to see if a machine was capable of replicating pareidolia. The duo came across the idea while engaged in a different project using the same face recognition technology. In order to search for instances of pareidolia, a computer operates Google Maps while a robot uses an algorithm to detect faces on the Earth’s surface. With the aid of ofxBerkelium and a face tracking library made by Jason Saragih, Onformative’s Facetracker has produced a surprising number of viable images.

Onformative’s Facetracker has circled the planet several times and, although not all of its results produce obvious faces, the project has shown that machines are capable of replicating pareidolia.

To see more of Onformative’s landscape portraits, click here.

(Sources: Onformative/Fast Company/Wired

-Janine Truong

5 Photos
/ Google Faces Google Maps Photography Onformative Technology Earth Portraits Pareidolia
Photo Friday with Alma Haser’s Cosmic Surgery
By superimposing copies of her models’ faces made into origami on their original portraits, Alma Haser creates interesting, although unsettling, images. The London artist creates these cubist-like images by printing multiple copies of her subject’s face, making them into origami, and then shooting the original photograph with the origami placed on top. This method allows Haser to bring her photography into another dimension. She is not only capturing or representing her models, but completely recreating them.
Although in the artist’s statement Haser never explicitly describes the play on words and relationship between “cosmic surgery” and “cosmetic surgery,” the viewer can imagine a future dystopia where manipulation and ideals of beauty, now unrecognizable to us, could exist. She writes, ” There is something quite alien about the manipulated faces, as if they belong to some futuristic next generation.”
For the entire series please go here.
-Rudayna Bahubeshi
Photo Friday with Alma Haser’s Cosmic Surgery
By superimposing copies of her models’ faces made into origami on their original portraits, Alma Haser creates interesting, although unsettling, images. The London artist creates these cubist-like images by printing multiple copies of her subject’s face, making them into origami, and then shooting the original photograph with the origami placed on top. This method allows Haser to bring her photography into another dimension. She is not only capturing or representing her models, but completely recreating them.
Although in the artist’s statement Haser never explicitly describes the play on words and relationship between “cosmic surgery” and “cosmetic surgery,” the viewer can imagine a future dystopia where manipulation and ideals of beauty, now unrecognizable to us, could exist. She writes, ” There is something quite alien about the manipulated faces, as if they belong to some futuristic next generation.”
For the entire series please go here.
-Rudayna Bahubeshi
Photo Friday with Alma Haser’s Cosmic Surgery
By superimposing copies of her models’ faces made into origami on their original portraits, Alma Haser creates interesting, although unsettling, images. The London artist creates these cubist-like images by printing multiple copies of her subject’s face, making them into origami, and then shooting the original photograph with the origami placed on top. This method allows Haser to bring her photography into another dimension. She is not only capturing or representing her models, but completely recreating them.
Although in the artist’s statement Haser never explicitly describes the play on words and relationship between “cosmic surgery” and “cosmetic surgery,” the viewer can imagine a future dystopia where manipulation and ideals of beauty, now unrecognizable to us, could exist. She writes, ” There is something quite alien about the manipulated faces, as if they belong to some futuristic next generation.”
For the entire series please go here.
-Rudayna Bahubeshi
Penelope Umbrico’s ‘Suns from Flickr’

Upon searching the word ‘sunsets’ on flickr Penelope Umbrico discovered more than half a million photos of sunsets that had been shared by people from all around the world. Selecting a few hundred from this vast collection she created the ‘suns from Flickr’ installation in which the selected photos were placed side-by-side forming a huge wall of suns.

What I find most interesting about this piece are the questions it raises about technology as an artefact and our use of it (in all its varying forms) for the representation of natural phenomena. The sun in all its ubiquity has and continues to be photographed via the many different types of photograph technology; many of these photographs are then shared on the internet on websites like flickr, facebook and of course tumblr. Umbrico, whether intentionally or inadvertedly, lays emphasis on the underlying veneer of irony that characterises nature photography. Photography as a medium of artistic expression has indeed impressed upon us many of the often-fleeting splendours of the natural world, splendours that are sufficiently ephemeral to render the capturing of them in time, through photography, more of a worthwhile pursuit. The sun however is and will, to the best of my scientific knowledge, always be here – the giver of life and warmth so completely eternal, it begs the question: why are there so many photos of it?

‘Suns from Flickr’ is currently on display as part of the ‘Landmark: the Fields of Photography’ exhibition now on at Somerset House in London: http://www.somersethouse.org.uk/about/press/press-releases/landmark-the-fields-of-photography

 - Adrian Deen

Penelope Umbrico’s ‘Suns from Flickr’

Upon searching the word ‘sunsets’ on flickr Penelope Umbrico discovered more than half a million photos of sunsets that had been shared by people from all around the world. Selecting a few hundred from this vast collection she created the ‘suns from Flickr’ installation in which the selected photos were placed side-by-side forming a huge wall of suns.

What I find most interesting about this piece are the questions it raises about technology as an artefact and our use of it (in all its varying forms) for the representation of natural phenomena. The sun in all its ubiquity has and continues to be photographed via the many different types of photograph technology; many of these photographs are then shared on the internet on websites like flickr, facebook and of course tumblr. Umbrico, whether intentionally or inadvertedly, lays emphasis on the underlying veneer of irony that characterises nature photography. Photography as a medium of artistic expression has indeed impressed upon us many of the often-fleeting splendours of the natural world, splendours that are sufficiently ephemeral to render the capturing of them in time, through photography, more of a worthwhile pursuit. The sun however is and will, to the best of my scientific knowledge, always be here – the giver of life and warmth so completely eternal, it begs the question: why are there so many photos of it?

‘Suns from Flickr’ is currently on display as part of the ‘Landmark: the Fields of Photography’ exhibition now on at Somerset House in London: http://www.somersethouse.org.uk/about/press/press-releases/landmark-the-fields-of-photography

 - Adrian Deen

art science adrian deen penelope umbrico suns flickr photography
Landscape Revisited
The ability for people to go into space has opened many doors in terms of exploration and knowledge of the universe, yet it has also given us a chance to look at our Earth from a different perspective.
Col. Chris Hadfield is a Canadian astronaut, currently onboard the International Space Station, who takes pictures of the Earth while on his mission in space. It is a new style of landscape photography. Previously, our only options in terms of ‘landscape’ photography were to take a picture of the Earth, on Earth, or capture the vast expanse of space via astrophotography.
Now, we can take into account the scale of the Earth; how massive desserts are, how tiny cities are. We can see both natural beauty and industrial devastation. His images are reflections of the various societies in this world, and its history. Like all great photographs, they tell stories, either about lost civilizations, daily routines or environmental changes. 
Though not everyone can just get into a spaceship and take pictures all day, what Col. Chris Hadfield is doing, is opening doors for future artists, scientists, and explorers, to see the different ways in which we can capture our surroundings, through photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Revisited
The ability for people to go into space has opened many doors in terms of exploration and knowledge of the universe, yet it has also given us a chance to look at our Earth from a different perspective.
Col. Chris Hadfield is a Canadian astronaut, currently onboard the International Space Station, who takes pictures of the Earth while on his mission in space. It is a new style of landscape photography. Previously, our only options in terms of ‘landscape’ photography were to take a picture of the Earth, on Earth, or capture the vast expanse of space via astrophotography.
Now, we can take into account the scale of the Earth; how massive desserts are, how tiny cities are. We can see both natural beauty and industrial devastation. His images are reflections of the various societies in this world, and its history. Like all great photographs, they tell stories, either about lost civilizations, daily routines or environmental changes. 
Though not everyone can just get into a spaceship and take pictures all day, what Col. Chris Hadfield is doing, is opening doors for future artists, scientists, and explorers, to see the different ways in which we can capture our surroundings, through photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Revisited
The ability for people to go into space has opened many doors in terms of exploration and knowledge of the universe, yet it has also given us a chance to look at our Earth from a different perspective.
Col. Chris Hadfield is a Canadian astronaut, currently onboard the International Space Station, who takes pictures of the Earth while on his mission in space. It is a new style of landscape photography. Previously, our only options in terms of ‘landscape’ photography were to take a picture of the Earth, on Earth, or capture the vast expanse of space via astrophotography.
Now, we can take into account the scale of the Earth; how massive desserts are, how tiny cities are. We can see both natural beauty and industrial devastation. His images are reflections of the various societies in this world, and its history. Like all great photographs, they tell stories, either about lost civilizations, daily routines or environmental changes. 
Though not everyone can just get into a spaceship and take pictures all day, what Col. Chris Hadfield is doing, is opening doors for future artists, scientists, and explorers, to see the different ways in which we can capture our surroundings, through photography.
-Anna Paluch

Landscape Revisited

The ability for people to go into space has opened many doors in terms of exploration and knowledge of the universe, yet it has also given us a chance to look at our Earth from a different perspective.

Col. Chris Hadfield is a Canadian astronaut, currently onboard the International Space Station, who takes pictures of the Earth while on his mission in space. It is a new style of landscape photography. Previously, our only options in terms of ‘landscape’ photography were to take a picture of the Earth, on Earth, or capture the vast expanse of space via astrophotography.

Now, we can take into account the scale of the Earth; how massive desserts are, how tiny cities are. We can see both natural beauty and industrial devastation. His images are reflections of the various societies in this world, and its history. Like all great photographs, they tell stories, either about lost civilizations, daily routines or environmental changes.

Though not everyone can just get into a spaceship and take pictures all day, what Col. Chris Hadfield is doing, is opening doors for future artists, scientists, and explorers, to see the different ways in which we can capture our surroundings, through photography.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ Col. Chris Hadfield astrophotography landscape photography art science art and science journal anna paluch nature space
Photo Friday With the Russian Tourists Who Climbed the Pyramids
This past week, photos and a rather contentious story of a few Russian tourists have been covered by dozens of major news sources. The stunning photos above were captured illegally by a small group of tourists at the Ancient Egyptian Pyramids, who hid from guards for four hours after closing time before climbing the Pyramid of Giza. 
Despite breaking the rules and the chaos that would ensue if more people tried to pull this off, I love these photographs. I have had the opportunity to visit the Pyramids a couple of times, and these photos portray the kind of experience that one hopes for but doesn’t necessarily receive. While the visit makes for an incredible experience, and the history and wonder is palpable, I remember the line ups, maze of tour buses, and litter as well as I can recall anything else. These photos inspire the sublime wonder of the Pyramids without all of the distractions.
Since the stunt, one of the photographers, Vadim Makhorov, has publicly apologized, though quite obviously without actually regretting the action. Nor is this the first brush with the law for the team, which included Vitaliy Raskalov, named Russian Skywalker by the Huffington Post . Check out his Instagram account for more photos.
Should the team have apologized? Or are photos like this an example of when rules are made to be broken?
Photo Friday With the Russian Tourists Who Climbed the Pyramids
This past week, photos and a rather contentious story of a few Russian tourists have been covered by dozens of major news sources. The stunning photos above were captured illegally by a small group of tourists at the Ancient Egyptian Pyramids, who hid from guards for four hours after closing time before climbing the Pyramid of Giza. 
Despite breaking the rules and the chaos that would ensue if more people tried to pull this off, I love these photographs. I have had the opportunity to visit the Pyramids a couple of times, and these photos portray the kind of experience that one hopes for but doesn’t necessarily receive. While the visit makes for an incredible experience, and the history and wonder is palpable, I remember the line ups, maze of tour buses, and litter as well as I can recall anything else. These photos inspire the sublime wonder of the Pyramids without all of the distractions.
Since the stunt, one of the photographers, Vadim Makhorov, has publicly apologized, though quite obviously without actually regretting the action. Nor is this the first brush with the law for the team, which included Vitaliy Raskalov, named Russian Skywalker by the Huffington Post . Check out his Instagram account for more photos.
Should the team have apologized? Or are photos like this an example of when rules are made to be broken?
Photo Friday With the Russian Tourists Who Climbed the Pyramids
This past week, photos and a rather contentious story of a few Russian tourists have been covered by dozens of major news sources. The stunning photos above were captured illegally by a small group of tourists at the Ancient Egyptian Pyramids, who hid from guards for four hours after closing time before climbing the Pyramid of Giza. 
Despite breaking the rules and the chaos that would ensue if more people tried to pull this off, I love these photographs. I have had the opportunity to visit the Pyramids a couple of times, and these photos portray the kind of experience that one hopes for but doesn’t necessarily receive. While the visit makes for an incredible experience, and the history and wonder is palpable, I remember the line ups, maze of tour buses, and litter as well as I can recall anything else. These photos inspire the sublime wonder of the Pyramids without all of the distractions.
Since the stunt, one of the photographers, Vadim Makhorov, has publicly apologized, though quite obviously without actually regretting the action. Nor is this the first brush with the law for the team, which included Vitaliy Raskalov, named Russian Skywalker by the Huffington Post . Check out his Instagram account for more photos.
Should the team have apologized? Or are photos like this an example of when rules are made to be broken?

Photo Friday With the Russian Tourists Who Climbed the Pyramids

This past week, photos and a rather contentious story of a few Russian tourists have been covered by dozens of major news sources. The stunning photos above were captured illegally by a small group of tourists at the Ancient Egyptian Pyramids, who hid from guards for four hours after closing time before climbing the Pyramid of Giza. 

Despite breaking the rules and the chaos that would ensue if more people tried to pull this off, I love these photographs. I have had the opportunity to visit the Pyramids a couple of times, and these photos portray the kind of experience that one hopes for but doesn’t necessarily receive. While the visit makes for an incredible experience, and the history and wonder is palpable, I remember the line ups, maze of tour buses, and litter as well as I can recall anything else. These photos inspire the sublime wonder of the Pyramids without all of the distractions.

Since the stunt, one of the photographers, Vadim Makhorov, has publicly apologized, though quite obviously without actually regretting the action. Nor is this the first brush with the law for the team, which included Vitaliy Raskalov, named Russian Skywalker by the Huffington Post . Check out his Instagram account for more photos.

Should the team have apologized? Or are photos like this an example of when rules are made to be broken?

3 Photos
/ photography pyramids history art science rudayna bahubeshi Vitaliy Raskalov Vadim Makhorov

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