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Landscape Photomontage
Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.
Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.
Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.
The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 
Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Photomontage
Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.
Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.
Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.
The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 
Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Photomontage
Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.
Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.
Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.
The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 
Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Photomontage
Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.
Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.
Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.
The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 
Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.
-Anna Paluch

Landscape Photomontage


Photographing landscapes should not be limited to a simple point and click. There are many different capturing and editing techniques that artists, such as Matt Wisniewski, Keira Gruttner, and Fong Qi Wei, use in order to capture their surroundings through their unique perspectives and digital tools.

Matt Wisniewski is a collage artist based in New York who takes fashion photographs and manipulates them to fit into a specific geological element or landscape photograph. His “Landscape” Series turns mountain ranges into heads atop human shoulders, or trees on a hillside into cascading hair. His other series’ “Mineral Minds” and “My Home is the Sea” combine minerals and stones, and crashing waves (respectfully) with the models, acting as either extensions of their anatomy or wardrobe. His work is both landscape and portrait photography in one.

Keira Gruttner also uses collage to combine elements of landscape, but unlike Matt Wisniewski, Gruttner specifically focuses on nature. The artist states that her upbringing on the East Coast of Canada inspired her to create her collages. Her work is more tactile than other digital collages, as she first prints her landscapes and then carefully selects elements from each and assembles the pieces together, like a puzzle. She often repeats the process again through scanning the first collage, to then print and prepare for the final collage.

The work of Fong Qi Wei, “Time is a Dimension”, is also puzzle-like, connecting different time-periods of the day with urban skylines to show the daily changes in our atmosphere. In one picture, we are able to see both morning and evening, as if the two were always ongoing at the same time. The artist’s work plays with time and dimension, where the photograph is not only capturing one moment in time, but many times in, what is presented as, one moment. 

Each of these artists plays with our perceptions in terms of how we remember our surroundings and especially our relationship with the landscapes around us. Their works are refreshing examples of the new techniques in landscape photography.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ anna paluch keira gruttner fong qi wei matt wisniewski photography digital photography collage nature landscape art science anatomy art and science journal photomontage
Encased
A frame is not the only way to encase an artwork for display. More artists are experimenting with plastic resins or glass to create their pieces. The resin preserves the work, more so than a wooden frame would do. The results are often similar to prehistoric sap with various objects from leaves to bugs, found within them.
If it wasn’t for plastic resin, some of artist Peter Alexander’s works would not even exist, as his piece “Cloud Box” (1966) consisted of “introducing water vapor to the liquid resin during the casting process” which created the cloud within. The artist was actually able to ‘catch’ a cloud, or technically, create a cloud and trap it forever, thanks to the resin.
Another artist who tampers with their resin to create unique pieces is Michal Macku, who in 1989 began working with ‘gellage’, his own invention of combining collage elements and gelatin. Working with gelatin prints, the artist is able to reshape his photographs, “changing their relationships and endowing them with new meanings during the transfer”. He then combines this process with state-of-the-art technology to great his large scale glass gellages, which trap his images in a 3D setting, rather than flat like a photograph.
Roni Horn’s “Well and Truly” (2009-2010) plays with illusion, where the work at first seems like a container holding water, but inspecting the piece reveals the work’s true medium; a solid cylinder of glass. The artist emanates the characteristic of water, its changeability, by allowing air to come into contact with the top of the glass as it sets in its mold, creating a smooth gloss. The artist undermines “all certainty about [the piece’s] solid or liquid nature” changing the physical experience of the viewer.
Changing physical materiality is also present in Kirsten Baskett’s pieces, such as “Autonoma”. Baskett etches delicate images onto fine Japanese kozo paper, later encasing them in clear resin, and the once “fragile paper becomes indestructible and untouchable”. The artist sees her pieces as frozen in time, permanently available to view, but never to experience the true materiality of the object captured within.
-Anna Paluch
Encased
A frame is not the only way to encase an artwork for display. More artists are experimenting with plastic resins or glass to create their pieces. The resin preserves the work, more so than a wooden frame would do. The results are often similar to prehistoric sap with various objects from leaves to bugs, found within them.
If it wasn’t for plastic resin, some of artist Peter Alexander’s works would not even exist, as his piece “Cloud Box” (1966) consisted of “introducing water vapor to the liquid resin during the casting process” which created the cloud within. The artist was actually able to ‘catch’ a cloud, or technically, create a cloud and trap it forever, thanks to the resin.
Another artist who tampers with their resin to create unique pieces is Michal Macku, who in 1989 began working with ‘gellage’, his own invention of combining collage elements and gelatin. Working with gelatin prints, the artist is able to reshape his photographs, “changing their relationships and endowing them with new meanings during the transfer”. He then combines this process with state-of-the-art technology to great his large scale glass gellages, which trap his images in a 3D setting, rather than flat like a photograph.
Roni Horn’s “Well and Truly” (2009-2010) plays with illusion, where the work at first seems like a container holding water, but inspecting the piece reveals the work’s true medium; a solid cylinder of glass. The artist emanates the characteristic of water, its changeability, by allowing air to come into contact with the top of the glass as it sets in its mold, creating a smooth gloss. The artist undermines “all certainty about [the piece’s] solid or liquid nature” changing the physical experience of the viewer.
Changing physical materiality is also present in Kirsten Baskett’s pieces, such as “Autonoma”. Baskett etches delicate images onto fine Japanese kozo paper, later encasing them in clear resin, and the once “fragile paper becomes indestructible and untouchable”. The artist sees her pieces as frozen in time, permanently available to view, but never to experience the true materiality of the object captured within.
-Anna Paluch
Encased
A frame is not the only way to encase an artwork for display. More artists are experimenting with plastic resins or glass to create their pieces. The resin preserves the work, more so than a wooden frame would do. The results are often similar to prehistoric sap with various objects from leaves to bugs, found within them.
If it wasn’t for plastic resin, some of artist Peter Alexander’s works would not even exist, as his piece “Cloud Box” (1966) consisted of “introducing water vapor to the liquid resin during the casting process” which created the cloud within. The artist was actually able to ‘catch’ a cloud, or technically, create a cloud and trap it forever, thanks to the resin.
Another artist who tampers with their resin to create unique pieces is Michal Macku, who in 1989 began working with ‘gellage’, his own invention of combining collage elements and gelatin. Working with gelatin prints, the artist is able to reshape his photographs, “changing their relationships and endowing them with new meanings during the transfer”. He then combines this process with state-of-the-art technology to great his large scale glass gellages, which trap his images in a 3D setting, rather than flat like a photograph.
Roni Horn’s “Well and Truly” (2009-2010) plays with illusion, where the work at first seems like a container holding water, but inspecting the piece reveals the work’s true medium; a solid cylinder of glass. The artist emanates the characteristic of water, its changeability, by allowing air to come into contact with the top of the glass as it sets in its mold, creating a smooth gloss. The artist undermines “all certainty about [the piece’s] solid or liquid nature” changing the physical experience of the viewer.
Changing physical materiality is also present in Kirsten Baskett’s pieces, such as “Autonoma”. Baskett etches delicate images onto fine Japanese kozo paper, later encasing them in clear resin, and the once “fragile paper becomes indestructible and untouchable”. The artist sees her pieces as frozen in time, permanently available to view, but never to experience the true materiality of the object captured within.
-Anna Paluch
Encased
A frame is not the only way to encase an artwork for display. More artists are experimenting with plastic resins or glass to create their pieces. The resin preserves the work, more so than a wooden frame would do. The results are often similar to prehistoric sap with various objects from leaves to bugs, found within them.
If it wasn’t for plastic resin, some of artist Peter Alexander’s works would not even exist, as his piece “Cloud Box” (1966) consisted of “introducing water vapor to the liquid resin during the casting process” which created the cloud within. The artist was actually able to ‘catch’ a cloud, or technically, create a cloud and trap it forever, thanks to the resin.
Another artist who tampers with their resin to create unique pieces is Michal Macku, who in 1989 began working with ‘gellage’, his own invention of combining collage elements and gelatin. Working with gelatin prints, the artist is able to reshape his photographs, “changing their relationships and endowing them with new meanings during the transfer”. He then combines this process with state-of-the-art technology to great his large scale glass gellages, which trap his images in a 3D setting, rather than flat like a photograph.
Roni Horn’s “Well and Truly” (2009-2010) plays with illusion, where the work at first seems like a container holding water, but inspecting the piece reveals the work’s true medium; a solid cylinder of glass. The artist emanates the characteristic of water, its changeability, by allowing air to come into contact with the top of the glass as it sets in its mold, creating a smooth gloss. The artist undermines “all certainty about [the piece’s] solid or liquid nature” changing the physical experience of the viewer.
Changing physical materiality is also present in Kirsten Baskett’s pieces, such as “Autonoma”. Baskett etches delicate images onto fine Japanese kozo paper, later encasing them in clear resin, and the once “fragile paper becomes indestructible and untouchable”. The artist sees her pieces as frozen in time, permanently available to view, but never to experience the true materiality of the object captured within.
-Anna Paluch

Encased

A frame is not the only way to encase an artwork for display. More artists are experimenting with plastic resins or glass to create their pieces. The resin preserves the work, more so than a wooden frame would do. The results are often similar to prehistoric sap with various objects from leaves to bugs, found within them.

If it wasn’t for plastic resin, some of artist Peter Alexander’s works would not even exist, as his piece “Cloud Box” (1966) consisted of “introducing water vapor to the liquid resin during the casting process” which created the cloud within. The artist was actually able to ‘catch’ a cloud, or technically, create a cloud and trap it forever, thanks to the resin.

Another artist who tampers with their resin to create unique pieces is Michal Macku, who in 1989 began working with ‘gellage’, his own invention of combining collage elements and gelatin. Working with gelatin prints, the artist is able to reshape his photographs, “changing their relationships and endowing them with new meanings during the transfer”. He then combines this process with state-of-the-art technology to great his large scale glass gellages, which trap his images in a 3D setting, rather than flat like a photograph.

Roni Horn’s “Well and Truly” (2009-2010) plays with illusion, where the work at first seems like a container holding water, but inspecting the piece reveals the work’s true medium; a solid cylinder of glass. The artist emanates the characteristic of water, its changeability, by allowing air to come into contact with the top of the glass as it sets in its mold, creating a smooth gloss. The artist undermines “all certainty about [the piece’s] solid or liquid nature” changing the physical experience of the viewer.

Changing physical materiality is also present in Kirsten Baskett’s pieces, such as “Autonoma”. Baskett etches delicate images onto fine Japanese kozo paper, later encasing them in clear resin, and the once “fragile paper becomes indestructible and untouchable”. The artist sees her pieces as frozen in time, permanently available to view, but never to experience the true materiality of the object captured within.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ anna paluch michal macku peter alexander roni horn kirsten baskett resin plastic resin glass resin photography art science preservation art and science journal gellage materiality changeability
Processing the Process
Jacinthe Lessard-L’s photographic and sculptural series La Chambre, 2010-2012, beautifully illuminates the integral relationship of art and the technology that makes it possible. Visitors to Truck Contemporary Gallery in Calgary where the works are being exhibited were confronted with walls lined with larger-than-life prints of colourful geometric shapes. These forms seem at once familiar in shape, but also alien due to the strange matte texture and bright pops of colour. Lessard-L’s series is visually stunning and initially elusive, thus drawing the viewer in for a closer look. Upon further inspection it becomes evident that the photos have captured the images of casts of the inner chambers of popular cameras from previous decades.
The strange physicality and unnatural colours of the silicone casts emphasize the wonder of the photographic process. In making visible the interior machinery of these devices one would assume that it would make the process more comprehensible, but it ironically remains just as elusive, if not more so.
There is a poetic self-referentiality to these works. The casts take shape within the camera in the same chambers where light is transformed into a photographic image. Lessard-L’s process makes physical the transformation chambers of the camera, putting the device and its process through a materialization of itself.  As Luba Diduch writes in an essay on this body of work “Lessard’s intention is to create an homage to an important space that, she says, is shrinking over time due to developments in technology.”
- Emily Cluett
Processing the Process
Jacinthe Lessard-L’s photographic and sculptural series La Chambre, 2010-2012, beautifully illuminates the integral relationship of art and the technology that makes it possible. Visitors to Truck Contemporary Gallery in Calgary where the works are being exhibited were confronted with walls lined with larger-than-life prints of colourful geometric shapes. These forms seem at once familiar in shape, but also alien due to the strange matte texture and bright pops of colour. Lessard-L’s series is visually stunning and initially elusive, thus drawing the viewer in for a closer look. Upon further inspection it becomes evident that the photos have captured the images of casts of the inner chambers of popular cameras from previous decades.
The strange physicality and unnatural colours of the silicone casts emphasize the wonder of the photographic process. In making visible the interior machinery of these devices one would assume that it would make the process more comprehensible, but it ironically remains just as elusive, if not more so.
There is a poetic self-referentiality to these works. The casts take shape within the camera in the same chambers where light is transformed into a photographic image. Lessard-L’s process makes physical the transformation chambers of the camera, putting the device and its process through a materialization of itself.  As Luba Diduch writes in an essay on this body of work “Lessard’s intention is to create an homage to an important space that, she says, is shrinking over time due to developments in technology.”
- Emily Cluett
Processing the Process
Jacinthe Lessard-L’s photographic and sculptural series La Chambre, 2010-2012, beautifully illuminates the integral relationship of art and the technology that makes it possible. Visitors to Truck Contemporary Gallery in Calgary where the works are being exhibited were confronted with walls lined with larger-than-life prints of colourful geometric shapes. These forms seem at once familiar in shape, but also alien due to the strange matte texture and bright pops of colour. Lessard-L’s series is visually stunning and initially elusive, thus drawing the viewer in for a closer look. Upon further inspection it becomes evident that the photos have captured the images of casts of the inner chambers of popular cameras from previous decades.
The strange physicality and unnatural colours of the silicone casts emphasize the wonder of the photographic process. In making visible the interior machinery of these devices one would assume that it would make the process more comprehensible, but it ironically remains just as elusive, if not more so.
There is a poetic self-referentiality to these works. The casts take shape within the camera in the same chambers where light is transformed into a photographic image. Lessard-L’s process makes physical the transformation chambers of the camera, putting the device and its process through a materialization of itself.  As Luba Diduch writes in an essay on this body of work “Lessard’s intention is to create an homage to an important space that, she says, is shrinking over time due to developments in technology.”
- Emily Cluett

Processing the Process

Jacinthe Lessard-L’s photographic and sculptural series La Chambre, 2010-2012, beautifully illuminates the integral relationship of art and the technology that makes it possible. Visitors to Truck Contemporary Gallery in Calgary where the works are being exhibited were confronted with walls lined with larger-than-life prints of colourful geometric shapes. These forms seem at once familiar in shape, but also alien due to the strange matte texture and bright pops of colour. Lessard-L’s series is visually stunning and initially elusive, thus drawing the viewer in for a closer look. Upon further inspection it becomes evident that the photos have captured the images of casts of the inner chambers of popular cameras from previous decades.

The strange physicality and unnatural colours of the silicone casts emphasize the wonder of the photographic process. In making visible the interior machinery of these devices one would assume that it would make the process more comprehensible, but it ironically remains just as elusive, if not more so.

There is a poetic self-referentiality to these works. The casts take shape within the camera in the same chambers where light is transformed into a photographic image. Lessard-L’s process makes physical the transformation chambers of the camera, putting the device and its process through a materialization of itself.  As Luba Diduch writes in an essay on this body of work “Lessard’s intention is to create an homage to an important space that, she says, is shrinking over time due to developments in technology.”

- Emily Cluett

3 Photos
/ photography camera sculpture Calgary
The Art of Our Bodies
The intricacies of the human body are explored in The New Cruelty’s work, where the production company based in Brooklyn took photographs of the famous BODIES: The Exhibition.
These photographs both fascinate and repulse, but most importantly, like the exhibit, they educate viewers, allowing us to get a glimpse of how our bodies function. After the initial shock of seeing our insides so exposed, viewers begin to discover the great detail in our veins and the spectrum of colour found just in and around the heart. Our bodies present themselves as works of art, in this case, exhibited and then photographed.
The aim of BODIES: The Exhibition is to “[allow] visitors to see the human body’s inner beauty in educational and awe-inspiring ways”, with bodies and organs preserved using “a revolutionary process called polymer preservation, in which human tissue is permanently preserved using liquid silicone rubber.” Every aspect of the body is covered, allowing curious minds to see up close that which most of us never get to see. 
The exhibit, and especially the pictures taken by The New Cruelty, shows just how much a part of nature we are; our whole-body vein system looks strikingly similar to the veins seen on leaves, and our pulmonary veins and arteries (attached to the heart) look more like coral reefs than human organs.
-Anna Paluch
The Art of Our Bodies
The intricacies of the human body are explored in The New Cruelty’s work, where the production company based in Brooklyn took photographs of the famous BODIES: The Exhibition.
These photographs both fascinate and repulse, but most importantly, like the exhibit, they educate viewers, allowing us to get a glimpse of how our bodies function. After the initial shock of seeing our insides so exposed, viewers begin to discover the great detail in our veins and the spectrum of colour found just in and around the heart. Our bodies present themselves as works of art, in this case, exhibited and then photographed.
The aim of BODIES: The Exhibition is to “[allow] visitors to see the human body’s inner beauty in educational and awe-inspiring ways”, with bodies and organs preserved using “a revolutionary process called polymer preservation, in which human tissue is permanently preserved using liquid silicone rubber.” Every aspect of the body is covered, allowing curious minds to see up close that which most of us never get to see. 
The exhibit, and especially the pictures taken by The New Cruelty, shows just how much a part of nature we are; our whole-body vein system looks strikingly similar to the veins seen on leaves, and our pulmonary veins and arteries (attached to the heart) look more like coral reefs than human organs.
-Anna Paluch

The Art of Our Bodies

The intricacies of the human body are explored in The New Cruelty’s work, where the production company based in Brooklyn took photographs of the famous BODIES: The Exhibition.

These photographs both fascinate and repulse, but most importantly, like the exhibit, they educate viewers, allowing us to get a glimpse of how our bodies function. After the initial shock of seeing our insides so exposed, viewers begin to discover the great detail in our veins and the spectrum of colour found just in and around the heart. Our bodies present themselves as works of art, in this case, exhibited and then photographed.

The aim of BODIES: The Exhibition is to “[allow] visitors to see the human body’s inner beauty in educational and awe-inspiring ways”, with bodies and organs preserved using “a revolutionary process called polymer preservation, in which human tissue is permanently preserved using liquid silicone rubber.” Every aspect of the body is covered, allowing curious minds to see up close that which most of us never get to see.

The exhibit, and especially the pictures taken by The New Cruelty, shows just how much a part of nature we are; our whole-body vein system looks strikingly similar to the veins seen on leaves, and our pulmonary veins and arteries (attached to the heart) look more like coral reefs than human organs.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ The New Cruelty James Bareham anna paluch BODIES: The Exhibition bodies anatomy body human body art science photography art and science journal
Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography
Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.
Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions. 
Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.
Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch
Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography
Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.
Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions. 
Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.
Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch
Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography
Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.
Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions. 
Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.
Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch

Taking A Closer Look: Photomicrography

Photography has been used for decades to capture the images that we see with our eyes, but, it can also help us to see things that we could never see with just the naked eye.

Photomicrographers are those who photograph the microscopic world around us. With the help of special cameras, we can now see cell nuclei or the intestines of fruit flies if we so wanted to. There are hundreds of photomicrographers in the world, each with their own unique specialization or style; like artists, they present to us their own interpretations of microscopic objects, using various techniques, such as two-photon excitation microscopy, which “provides distinct advantages for three-dimensional imaging”. This process is used for “imaging of living cells, especially within intact tissues such as brain slices, embryos, whole organs, and even entire animals”, making Dr. Paul Appleton’s pictures both studies of biological components of organisms, but also aesthetically, vibrant, geometric abstractions.

Claudia Buttera creates similar pieces, most of them cells under stress, and frames them to be placed in a gallery setting, where both the science of the subject and aesthetic of the overall piece is appreciated for as a work of art. The muse is nature, the artist Buttera.

Nikola Rahme moves slightly further away from the subjects, revealing the actual features and body parts of wasps and beetles, instead of merely the puzzle pieces of their anatomy known as cells. Works such as Rahme’s help viewers put a ‘face’ to the cluster of shapes that the aforementioned photomicrographers capture.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ photomicrography cells science biology Microscopy microbiology nuclei photography Dr. Paul Appleton Claudia Buttera Nikola Rahme anna paluch art art and science journal
The Birth and Death of Stars by Sanjeev Sivarulrasa
For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, Sanjeev Sivarulrasa will be showing his installation of six long-exposure astro-photographic works printed on aluminum. These images will depict star-birth and star-death regions of the night sky.
The images are from Sivarulrasa’s visits to Eastern Ontario. As he describes leaving the city: “For me, the pristine night sky is a meditative space that engages the senses and the mind. In cities, the night sky appears bland and almost featureless – most people don’t even bother to look up. That’s the reality of living under light pollution. By driving an hour or more away from the city lights of Ottawa, I get to see a panorama of stars from horizon to horizon, which invites observation and awareness.”
In his works, Sivalrurasa is interested in the subjective experience rather than the presumed objective reality. His tools are a telescope, lenses, oculars and a digital camera, but he captures his images over several hours, or sometimes even several nights, and then combines the images digitally in his studio to create the final composite work.
For Nuit Blanche on September 21st, his works will be on display at the Fritizi Gallery on Wellington Street.
- Lee Jones
The Birth and Death of Stars by Sanjeev Sivarulrasa
For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, Sanjeev Sivarulrasa will be showing his installation of six long-exposure astro-photographic works printed on aluminum. These images will depict star-birth and star-death regions of the night sky.
The images are from Sivarulrasa’s visits to Eastern Ontario. As he describes leaving the city: “For me, the pristine night sky is a meditative space that engages the senses and the mind. In cities, the night sky appears bland and almost featureless – most people don’t even bother to look up. That’s the reality of living under light pollution. By driving an hour or more away from the city lights of Ottawa, I get to see a panorama of stars from horizon to horizon, which invites observation and awareness.”
In his works, Sivalrurasa is interested in the subjective experience rather than the presumed objective reality. His tools are a telescope, lenses, oculars and a digital camera, but he captures his images over several hours, or sometimes even several nights, and then combines the images digitally in his studio to create the final composite work.
For Nuit Blanche on September 21st, his works will be on display at the Fritizi Gallery on Wellington Street.
- Lee Jones

The Birth and Death of Stars by Sanjeev Sivarulrasa

For Nuit Blanche Ottawa-Gatineau, Sanjeev Sivarulrasa will be showing his installation of six long-exposure astro-photographic works printed on aluminum. These images will depict star-birth and star-death regions of the night sky.

The images are from Sivarulrasa’s visits to Eastern Ontario. As he describes leaving the city: “For me, the pristine night sky is a meditative space that engages the senses and the mind. In cities, the night sky appears bland and almost featureless – most people don’t even bother to look up. That’s the reality of living under light pollution. By driving an hour or more away from the city lights of Ottawa, I get to see a panorama of stars from horizon to horizon, which invites observation and awareness.”

In his works, Sivalrurasa is interested in the subjective experience rather than the presumed objective reality. His tools are a telescope, lenses, oculars and a digital camera, but he captures his images over several hours, or sometimes even several nights, and then combines the images digitally in his studio to create the final composite work.

For Nuit Blanche on September 21st, his works will be on display at the Fritizi Gallery on Wellington Street.

- Lee Jones

2 Photos
/ ottawa art nuit blanche ottawa gatineau sanjeev sivarulrasa astronomy photography
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders
Zach Nader’s Counterweight
There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 
Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 
In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:
“Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.
   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 
See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 
- Erin Saunders

Zach Nader’s Counterweight

There is no denying that digital media have facilitated what can only be described as an image-saturated world. As both producer and consumer, the “everyday” photographer now has access to virtually all the image-making technologies once only privy to a select few. One of the more fascinating developments in this phenomenon lies in the world of digital-imaging software; from the Instagram filter to the oft-preached Photoshop, programs are always working to tweak and re-touch our worlds. 

Brooklyn-based artist Zach Nader addresses what might be at stake in the editing obsession by posing this question, “How do image making technologies affect our experiences and memory?” In his 2012 project Counterweight, Nader uses the content-aware function in Photoshop to excess: he runs the program until it eliminates all the human figures from select family photographs. The function – of course meant to correct small imperfections – must attempt to “fill in” the voids left by the human figures and reconstruct the background as best it can. As we can see from Nader’s results, the digital tool cannot possibly fill the space with absolute accuracy, and what’s left are somewhat haunting images on which we can see both the attempt at digital intervention, and the ghostly impressions of a human presence. 

In an interview with In-B, Nader explains why this kind of software combined with the family snapshot-as-medium interests him especially:

Family snapshots are an unusual type of image. I began with them because they are used to simply idealize their subjects…These snapshots exist to show people in a specific place, and were often created quickly and with little to no knowledge of the apparatus used – a button was pushed. They become incredibly significant though as markers of what happened when and where – they are the record. Of course filters can be applied and objects added or removed, but that is not the primary concern for most users. The light might be terrible, someone may have moved, or the photographer really should have just gotten closer, but these are the images that people run into burning buildings for or pay exuberant fees for data recovery.

   This specific content-aware technique is one that I have used other works: Aspirations and optional features shown. I am very interested in the hardware and software that shapes the ways in which we make and view images. Content-aware is made for specific, and rather small, uses – having it fill in for representations of entire people and products breaks the tool from the intended use and opens up new possibilities.” 

See more of Nader’s work at his website here. 

- Erin Saunders

8 Photos
/ art science digital media photography photoshop family zach nader
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin
Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.
A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.
An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.
The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.
- Rob Echlin

Edward Burtynsky’s Latest Photographs, Water.

A sampling of photographer Edward Burtynsky’s latest works from the series Water (2007-2013). Burtynsky is perhaps best known for his award winning documentary Manufactured Landscapes, and his photographs of the oil industry, from its extraction, to its use and its subsequent disposal and waste. His beautiful, large-scale photographic prints provide the viewer with obvious visual pleasure, but they confront us with a moral dilemma regarding the exploitation of our finite natural resources.

An exhibition of Water opens at Nicholas Metivier Gallery, Burtynsky’s home gallery in Toronto on September 5th and runs through October 12th. The exhibition will travel to London’s Flowers Gallery next as it begins its world tour. As with all of Burtynsky’s series, the exhibition of prints is accompanied by a large, high quality coffee table book published by Steidl.

The creation of this series, spanning 6 years, was captured by the visionary director Jennifer Baichwal (of Manufactured Landscapes fame) in the documentary Watermark, which will have its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September. It is sure to be a breathtaking piece of film.

- Rob Echlin

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

9 Photos
/ art and science journal photography Edward Burtynsky burtynsky TIFF
Sterilisation
Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).
In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”
Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy. 
- Lee Jones
Sterilisation
Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).
In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”
Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy. 
- Lee Jones
Sterilisation
Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).
In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”
Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy. 
- Lee Jones
Sterilisation
Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).
In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”
Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy. 
- Lee Jones

Sterilisation

Sterilisation:(Science: technique) The complete destruction or elimination of all living microorganisms, accomplished by physical methods such as moist heat(steam), chemical agents (silver), radiation (gamma) or mechanical methods (immersion).

In this collaboration with designer Zena May Hendrick and art director Gemma Fletcher, photographer Mitch Payne captures visual representations of the forms of sterilisation within a Petri dish. As stated in our previous feature on Payne’s work, the photographer aims to make science open for discussion: 

It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject.”

Payne has been capturing concepts in science for the past year. He has worked on a project to visually represent the elements of the periodic table, and capturing the various sources of renewable energy

- Lee Jones

4 Photos
/ art photography science mitch payne lee jones sterilisation sterilization zena may hendrick gemma fletcher
Patrick Rochon’s Motion to Light
Extreme sports and art don’t usually go hand-in-hand, but photographer Patrick Rochon has found a way to counter that. The area of photography in which Rochon specializes is light-painting, which in itself is its own artistic genre. Setting the camera to a longer exposure time allows light-painters to create photographs that, you guessed it, look like they have been painted with light. The result is mesmerizing.
In Rochons’ Motion to Light series, he attached LED lights to wakeboards, and allowed the professional athletes the freedom to create their own compositions, as he snapped away on the shoreline. This was the first time the photographer had ever done such a project, but the experiment was a success.
Not only did the LED’s mimic large, vibrantly-coloured brushstrokes, but the reflection in the water added to the texture of the overall piece. Like seeing two different, traditional, art styles come together in one photograph, through an un-traditional method.
It seems that even sports and technology, are able to inspire creative works.
-Anna Paluch

Patrick Rochon’s Motion to Light


Extreme sports and art don’t usually go hand-in-hand, but photographer
Patrick Rochon has found a way to counter that. The area of photography in which Rochon specializes is light-painting, which in itself is its own artistic genre. Setting the camera to a longer exposure time allows light-painters to create photographs that, you guessed it, look like they have been painted with light. The result is mesmerizing.

In Rochons’ Motion to Light series, he attached LED lights to wakeboards, and allowed the professional athletes the freedom to create their own compositions, as he snapped away on the shoreline. This was the first time the photographer had ever done such a project, but the experiment was a success.

Not only did the LED’s mimic large, vibrantly-coloured brushstrokes, but the reflection in the water added to the texture of the overall piece. Like seeing two different, traditional, art styles come together in one photograph, through an un-traditional method.

It seems that even sports and technology, are able to inspire creative works.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

patrick rochon art science photography light painting sports wakeboarding anna paluch art and science journal

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