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Kate MacDowell
In this work, Crave, the artist Kate MacDowell has hand-sculptured porcelain to make a human/plant hybrid. MacDowell is better known for her animal/plant hybrids, but in this series the plant appears to grow out of human veins and body parts. As MacDowell discusses the influences in her work,
"The romantic ideal of a union with the natural world conflicts with our contemporary impact on the environment.  These pieces are in part responses to environmental stressors including climate change, toxic pollution, and gm crops.  They also borrow from myth, art history, figures of speech and other cultural touchstones.  In some pieces aspects of the human figure stand-in for ourselves and act out sometimes harrowing, sometimes humorous transformations which illustrate our current relationship with the natural world.  In each case the union between man and nature is shown to be one of friction and discomfort with the disturbing implication that we too are vulnerable to being victimized by our destructive practices."
To see more of MacDowell’s works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Kate MacDowell
In this work, Crave, the artist Kate MacDowell has hand-sculptured porcelain to make a human/plant hybrid. MacDowell is better known for her animal/plant hybrids, but in this series the plant appears to grow out of human veins and body parts. As MacDowell discusses the influences in her work,
"The romantic ideal of a union with the natural world conflicts with our contemporary impact on the environment.  These pieces are in part responses to environmental stressors including climate change, toxic pollution, and gm crops.  They also borrow from myth, art history, figures of speech and other cultural touchstones.  In some pieces aspects of the human figure stand-in for ourselves and act out sometimes harrowing, sometimes humorous transformations which illustrate our current relationship with the natural world.  In each case the union between man and nature is shown to be one of friction and discomfort with the disturbing implication that we too are vulnerable to being victimized by our destructive practices."
To see more of MacDowell’s works, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Klaus Enrique
Klaus Enrique, who studied genetics at the University of Nottingham, turned to photography as a way to show the unexpected. As his portfolio states, he likes to combine things in unlikely ways.
"Juxtapositions that inspire concerned thought, but assume - and conquer - the formidable challenge of embedding within each of the photographs, through the display of the unexpected and/or the contradictory, a consistently-poignant representation of life’s unending potential."
What I find interesting about Enrique’s work is how it plays into our natural disposition to always look for human faces in our environment. A grouping of vegetables, fruits and flowers suddenly turns into a human face because of the way our minds are wired. We take it for granted, it’s so much a part of our life that we never think about it, but the way humans look at the world is to look for themselves. For more information on Enrique’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Klaus Enrique
Klaus Enrique, who studied genetics at the University of Nottingham, turned to photography as a way to show the unexpected. As his portfolio states, he likes to combine things in unlikely ways.
"Juxtapositions that inspire concerned thought, but assume - and conquer - the formidable challenge of embedding within each of the photographs, through the display of the unexpected and/or the contradictory, a consistently-poignant representation of life’s unending potential."
What I find interesting about Enrique’s work is how it plays into our natural disposition to always look for human faces in our environment. A grouping of vegetables, fruits and flowers suddenly turns into a human face because of the way our minds are wired. We take it for granted, it’s so much a part of our life that we never think about it, but the way humans look at the world is to look for themselves. For more information on Enrique’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones
Klaus Enrique
Klaus Enrique, who studied genetics at the University of Nottingham, turned to photography as a way to show the unexpected. As his portfolio states, he likes to combine things in unlikely ways.
"Juxtapositions that inspire concerned thought, but assume - and conquer - the formidable challenge of embedding within each of the photographs, through the display of the unexpected and/or the contradictory, a consistently-poignant representation of life’s unending potential."
What I find interesting about Enrique’s work is how it plays into our natural disposition to always look for human faces in our environment. A grouping of vegetables, fruits and flowers suddenly turns into a human face because of the way our minds are wired. We take it for granted, it’s so much a part of our life that we never think about it, but the way humans look at the world is to look for themselves. For more information on Enrique’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones

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