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Rain Room
Rain Room, part of MoMA PS1’s exhibition, EXPO 1: New York, gives visitors the opportunity to experience the incredible:the power to control the rain.
3-D depth cameras, fixed on the sides of Rain Room, allow visitors to walk under the piece’s constant downpour without actually getting wet. When a person enters the 100 square metre room, the cameras detect the shape of the body and turn certain valves in the ceiling on and off. The result is a rain-free space that moves with the person, giving visitors a sense of control over the shower.
Following EXPO 1: New York's environmental theme, Rain Room looks into how science and innovation can help maintain the environment. It is also the latest and largest addition to a series of works by rAndom International, the studio which created the room. The series examines how viewers behave and interact with the works, a motive synonymous with Rain Room’s interactivity.
Rain Room first debuted last year in London and is currently on display at The Museum of Modern Art until July 28.

To view more photos of Rain Room, click here.
-Janine Truong

(Source: rAndom International / The Guardian / MoMA / The Barbican)
Rain Room
Rain Room, part of MoMA PS1’s exhibition, EXPO 1: New York, gives visitors the opportunity to experience the incredible:the power to control the rain.
3-D depth cameras, fixed on the sides of Rain Room, allow visitors to walk under the piece’s constant downpour without actually getting wet. When a person enters the 100 square metre room, the cameras detect the shape of the body and turn certain valves in the ceiling on and off. The result is a rain-free space that moves with the person, giving visitors a sense of control over the shower.
Following EXPO 1: New York's environmental theme, Rain Room looks into how science and innovation can help maintain the environment. It is also the latest and largest addition to a series of works by rAndom International, the studio which created the room. The series examines how viewers behave and interact with the works, a motive synonymous with Rain Room’s interactivity.
Rain Room first debuted last year in London and is currently on display at The Museum of Modern Art until July 28.

To view more photos of Rain Room, click here.
-Janine Truong

(Source: rAndom International / The Guardian / MoMA / The Barbican)
Rain Room
Rain Room, part of MoMA PS1’s exhibition, EXPO 1: New York, gives visitors the opportunity to experience the incredible:the power to control the rain.
3-D depth cameras, fixed on the sides of Rain Room, allow visitors to walk under the piece’s constant downpour without actually getting wet. When a person enters the 100 square metre room, the cameras detect the shape of the body and turn certain valves in the ceiling on and off. The result is a rain-free space that moves with the person, giving visitors a sense of control over the shower.
Following EXPO 1: New York's environmental theme, Rain Room looks into how science and innovation can help maintain the environment. It is also the latest and largest addition to a series of works by rAndom International, the studio which created the room. The series examines how viewers behave and interact with the works, a motive synonymous with Rain Room’s interactivity.
Rain Room first debuted last year in London and is currently on display at The Museum of Modern Art until July 28.

To view more photos of Rain Room, click here.
-Janine Truong

(Source: rAndom International / The Guardian / MoMA / The Barbican)

Rain Room

Rain Room, part of MoMA PS1’s exhibition, EXPO 1: New York, gives visitors the opportunity to experience the incredible:the power to control the rain.

3-D depth cameras, fixed on the sides of Rain Room, allow visitors to walk under the piece’s constant downpour without actually getting wet. When a person enters the 100 square metre room, the cameras detect the shape of the body and turn certain valves in the ceiling on and off. The result is a rain-free space that moves with the person, giving visitors a sense of control over the shower.

Following EXPO 1: New York's environmental theme, Rain Room looks into how science and innovation can help maintain the environment. It is also the latest and largest addition to a series of works by rAndom International, the studio which created the room. The series examines how viewers behave and interact with the works, a motive synonymous with Rain Room’s interactivity.

Rain Room first debuted last year in London and is currently on display at The Museum of Modern Art until July 28.

To view more photos of Rain Room, click here.

-Janine Truong

(Source: rAndom InternationalThe Guardian / MoMA / The Barbican)

3 Photos
/ rainroom art and science art science moma ps1 random international contemporary
Random International’s Rain Room
Have you ever wished you could control the weather? 
Random International, a multimedia artist collective studio in London, is known for their sensational participatory works. As in many of their past projects,Rain Room relies on audience participation and serves as a platform to explore and research the behaviours of its viewers. 
In this ambitious project, installed now at the Barbican Centre in London, viewers progress through a one hundred square metre of falling water, and in the process attempt to avoid being drenched. The project is a meticulously choreographed downpour that responds to the movements of the viewer, making it entirely possible to control the rain. 
Rain Room therefore not only encourages its audience to become participants, but also invites them to contemplate how technology alters our environment, ultimately questioning the role humans play in its alteration. It provides an instance where the forces beyond human control (i.e.: the weather) are manipulated by human activity.
For more information about Rain Room and Random International, please visit the Barbican Centre’s website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Random International’s Rain Room
Have you ever wished you could control the weather? 
Random International, a multimedia artist collective studio in London, is known for their sensational participatory works. As in many of their past projects,Rain Room relies on audience participation and serves as a platform to explore and research the behaviours of its viewers. 
In this ambitious project, installed now at the Barbican Centre in London, viewers progress through a one hundred square metre of falling water, and in the process attempt to avoid being drenched. The project is a meticulously choreographed downpour that responds to the movements of the viewer, making it entirely possible to control the rain. 
Rain Room therefore not only encourages its audience to become participants, but also invites them to contemplate how technology alters our environment, ultimately questioning the role humans play in its alteration. It provides an instance where the forces beyond human control (i.e.: the weather) are manipulated by human activity.
For more information about Rain Room and Random International, please visit the Barbican Centre’s website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Random International’s Rain Room
Have you ever wished you could control the weather? 
Random International, a multimedia artist collective studio in London, is known for their sensational participatory works. As in many of their past projects,Rain Room relies on audience participation and serves as a platform to explore and research the behaviours of its viewers. 
In this ambitious project, installed now at the Barbican Centre in London, viewers progress through a one hundred square metre of falling water, and in the process attempt to avoid being drenched. The project is a meticulously choreographed downpour that responds to the movements of the viewer, making it entirely possible to control the rain. 
Rain Room therefore not only encourages its audience to become participants, but also invites them to contemplate how technology alters our environment, ultimately questioning the role humans play in its alteration. It provides an instance where the forces beyond human control (i.e.: the weather) are manipulated by human activity.
For more information about Rain Room and Random International, please visit the Barbican Centre’s website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Random International’s Rain Room
Have you ever wished you could control the weather? 
Random International, a multimedia artist collective studio in London, is known for their sensational participatory works. As in many of their past projects,Rain Room relies on audience participation and serves as a platform to explore and research the behaviours of its viewers. 
In this ambitious project, installed now at the Barbican Centre in London, viewers progress through a one hundred square metre of falling water, and in the process attempt to avoid being drenched. The project is a meticulously choreographed downpour that responds to the movements of the viewer, making it entirely possible to control the rain. 
Rain Room therefore not only encourages its audience to become participants, but also invites them to contemplate how technology alters our environment, ultimately questioning the role humans play in its alteration. It provides an instance where the forces beyond human control (i.e.: the weather) are manipulated by human activity.
For more information about Rain Room and Random International, please visit the Barbican Centre’s website. 
- Victoria Nolte

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