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Mitch Payne’s Renewable Energy
In this collaborative photo series, photographer Mitch Payne worked with designer Kyle Bean to develop images of the micro systems of renewable energy. The goal of the series was to strip the systems to their simplest possible signifiers. As Payne describes this motive,
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject. For this particular series, each image depicts a glass tank housing various setups acting as ‘energy sources’ that power a light bulb.”
In the same vein as his series on the periodic table, Payne’s work focuses on how to represent movement and energy on an abstract level. The artist bounced around ideas with Bean and art director Gemma Fletcher on how best to interpret the systems in a simple and self-explanatory manner. The results —  keeping the systems inside of the tank concentrated the message and focused on the materials that create energy. As with many of Payne’s works, this series aims to educate and enhance the viewers perception of current events within the scientific umbrella.
The artist also wants readers to know that he is looking to collaborate with scientific writers on various subjects. If you have an interesting column or subject and would be interested in creating a “Photographic Essay,” get in touch here.
- Lee Jones 
Mitch Payne’s Renewable Energy
In this collaborative photo series, photographer Mitch Payne worked with designer Kyle Bean to develop images of the micro systems of renewable energy. The goal of the series was to strip the systems to their simplest possible signifiers. As Payne describes this motive,
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject. For this particular series, each image depicts a glass tank housing various setups acting as ‘energy sources’ that power a light bulb.”
In the same vein as his series on the periodic table, Payne’s work focuses on how to represent movement and energy on an abstract level. The artist bounced around ideas with Bean and art director Gemma Fletcher on how best to interpret the systems in a simple and self-explanatory manner. The results —  keeping the systems inside of the tank concentrated the message and focused on the materials that create energy. As with many of Payne’s works, this series aims to educate and enhance the viewers perception of current events within the scientific umbrella.
The artist also wants readers to know that he is looking to collaborate with scientific writers on various subjects. If you have an interesting column or subject and would be interested in creating a “Photographic Essay,” get in touch here.
- Lee Jones 
Mitch Payne’s Renewable Energy
In this collaborative photo series, photographer Mitch Payne worked with designer Kyle Bean to develop images of the micro systems of renewable energy. The goal of the series was to strip the systems to their simplest possible signifiers. As Payne describes this motive,
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject. For this particular series, each image depicts a glass tank housing various setups acting as ‘energy sources’ that power a light bulb.”
In the same vein as his series on the periodic table, Payne’s work focuses on how to represent movement and energy on an abstract level. The artist bounced around ideas with Bean and art director Gemma Fletcher on how best to interpret the systems in a simple and self-explanatory manner. The results —  keeping the systems inside of the tank concentrated the message and focused on the materials that create energy. As with many of Payne’s works, this series aims to educate and enhance the viewers perception of current events within the scientific umbrella.
The artist also wants readers to know that he is looking to collaborate with scientific writers on various subjects. If you have an interesting column or subject and would be interested in creating a “Photographic Essay,” get in touch here.
- Lee Jones 
Mitch Payne’s Renewable Energy
In this collaborative photo series, photographer Mitch Payne worked with designer Kyle Bean to develop images of the micro systems of renewable energy. The goal of the series was to strip the systems to their simplest possible signifiers. As Payne describes this motive,
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject. For this particular series, each image depicts a glass tank housing various setups acting as ‘energy sources’ that power a light bulb.”
In the same vein as his series on the periodic table, Payne’s work focuses on how to represent movement and energy on an abstract level. The artist bounced around ideas with Bean and art director Gemma Fletcher on how best to interpret the systems in a simple and self-explanatory manner. The results —  keeping the systems inside of the tank concentrated the message and focused on the materials that create energy. As with many of Payne’s works, this series aims to educate and enhance the viewers perception of current events within the scientific umbrella.
The artist also wants readers to know that he is looking to collaborate with scientific writers on various subjects. If you have an interesting column or subject and would be interested in creating a “Photographic Essay,” get in touch here.
- Lee Jones 
Mitch Payne’s Renewable Energy
In this collaborative photo series, photographer Mitch Payne worked with designer Kyle Bean to develop images of the micro systems of renewable energy. The goal of the series was to strip the systems to their simplest possible signifiers. As Payne describes this motive,
“It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject. For this particular series, each image depicts a glass tank housing various setups acting as ‘energy sources’ that power a light bulb.”
In the same vein as his series on the periodic table, Payne’s work focuses on how to represent movement and energy on an abstract level. The artist bounced around ideas with Bean and art director Gemma Fletcher on how best to interpret the systems in a simple and self-explanatory manner. The results —  keeping the systems inside of the tank concentrated the message and focused on the materials that create energy. As with many of Payne’s works, this series aims to educate and enhance the viewers perception of current events within the scientific umbrella.
The artist also wants readers to know that he is looking to collaborate with scientific writers on various subjects. If you have an interesting column or subject and would be interested in creating a “Photographic Essay,” get in touch here.
- Lee Jones 

Mitch Payne’s Renewable Energy

In this collaborative photo series, photographer Mitch Payne worked with designer Kyle Bean to develop images of the micro systems of renewable energy. The goal of the series was to strip the systems to their simplest possible signifiers. As Payne describes this motive,

It’s important not to over-complicate the subject, I think science can be as much a visual thing as a complicated spiral of information. When things are visually as simple as this, it can be easier to engage with a subject. For this particular series, each image depicts a glass tank housing various setups acting as ‘energy sources’ that power a light bulb.”

In the same vein as his series on the periodic table, Payne’s work focuses on how to represent movement and energy on an abstract level. The artist bounced around ideas with Bean and art director Gemma Fletcher on how best to interpret the systems in a simple and self-explanatory manner. The results —  keeping the systems inside of the tank concentrated the message and focused on the materials that create energy. As with many of Payne’s works, this series aims to educate and enhance the viewers perception of current events within the scientific umbrella.

The artist also wants readers to know that he is looking to collaborate with scientific writers on various subjects. If you have an interesting column or subject and would be interested in creating a “Photographic Essay,” get in touch here.

- Lee Jones 

5 Photos
/ art science renewable energy mitch payne kyle bean
Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source
Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.
For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”
So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).
Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 
Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream! 
In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source
Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.
For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”
So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).
Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 
Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream! 
In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source
Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.
For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”
So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).
Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 
Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream! 
In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron

Philips Bio-Light: Bacteria as Energy Source


Philips’ newest Microbial Home concept is a resourceful and visually dynamic bio-light that uses bioluminescent bacteria, fed with methane and composted material (poop and waste) as an energy source. As you can see, this light is not only an achievement technologically and scientifically, but it is pretty impressive aesthetically as well.

For Philips, however, this is more than a light — it is a life-changing idea: “Potentially biological products could be self-energizing, adaptive, responsive, self-repairing, act as biological sensors to environmental conditions, and change the way we communicate information.”

So there’s waste, and then light, but how does it work? In scientific terms, bioluminescent organisms produce luciferase, an enzyme, which interacts with a molecule called a luciferin, which emits light. This type of light is produced at low temperatures (unlike incandescence, where light is produced as a result of high heat).

Luminescent light is consequently less intense, described as “more suitable for … ambience and indication than functional illumination”. It is slower than conventional light sources, and its functionality depends on the living material’s life itself. What’s cool about that, though, is that the light emitted is susceptible to change, and likely to react to its environmental setting. Essentially, it’s an ambiance-creating light source with a life of its own. 

Philips sees a more practical future for this concept in night-time road markings, warning strips on flights of stairs, informational markings on cultural institutions, and the like. As well, they see potential in its ability to create new genres of atmospheric interior lighting, that could potentially have therapeutic effects. All of this said, there are no plans to sell this light as a Philips product. Instead, it is intended to spark discussion: “this concept is testing a possible future — not prescribing one.” Oh well… we can dream!

In the meantime, you can have a look at some other Philips Microbial Home concepts here. For more information on the bio-light, click here.

- Gabrielle Doiron

3 Photos
/ Microbial Home Philips art art and science artscience bacteria bio-light biology bioluminescence design environment future nature renewable energy science sustainability Gabrielle Doiron

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