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The Telegarden
Between the years of 1995 and 2004 the University of South Carolina, and subsequently the Ars Electronica Centre in Austria, were home to an innovative project called “The Telegarden”. This garden featured an area of dirt and plants inside a planter, which also held an industrial robot arm, which could be controlled through the internet.
How the garden worked, was that people from all over the world were able to observe the garden through a camera in the robot arm, but also, have the power to water and tend to the plants. If there was a free space the robot arm even allowed an individual, through the internet, the ability to plant a seed and take care of it. 
Professor Ken Goldberg explained that the decision to use a garden for this interactive project was that it is “very human, very immediate, very tactile”, a stark contrast to the idea of the internet and anything associated with it as complex, mathematical and machine-like. The internet is fast-paced, connecting us to other people and information in milliseconds, but the garden cannot be rushed, it must be cared for carefully,
As Randall Packer states:
“The Telegarden creates a physical garden as an environment to stage social interaction and community in virtual space. The Telegarden is a metaphor for the care and feeding of the delicate social ecology of the net." — San Jose Museum of Art, April 1998.

-Anna Paluch

The Telegarden

Between the years of 1995 and 2004 the University of South Carolina, and subsequently the Ars Electronica Centre in Austria, were home to an innovative project called “The Telegarden”. This garden featured an area of dirt and plants inside a planter, which also held an industrial robot arm, which could be controlled through the internet.

How the garden worked, was that people from all over the world were able to observe the garden through a camera in the robot arm, but also, have the power to water and tend to the plants. If there was a free space the robot arm even allowed an individual, through the internet, the ability to plant a seed and take care of it. 

Professor Ken Goldberg explained that the decision to use a garden for this interactive project was that it is “very human, very immediate, very tactile”, a stark contrast to the idea of the internet and anything associated with it as complex, mathematical and machine-like. The internet is fast-paced, connecting us to other people and information in milliseconds, but the garden cannot be rushed, it must be cared for carefully,

As Randall Packer states:

The Telegarden creates a physical garden as an environment to stage social interaction and community in virtual space. The Telegarden is a metaphor for the care and feeding of the delicate social ecology of the net." — San Jose Museum of Art, April 1998.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

The Telegarden university of south carolina ars electronica anna paluch art science art and science journal garden biology robotics engineering biodiversity

Enter the Box


When watching the video 
Box (2013), it feels like watching a clip of a film studio’s 3-D graphics reel. In fact, Box is a live-performance piece created by the group Bot & Dolly that challenges the viewers perceptions of space and surface, by projecting images onto a moving box. Sounds simple enough, but the optical illusions that the performance creates questions logical space. An object goes from flat to three-dimensional within seconds, and then even within the structure, three-dimensional shapes begin to form.

The technology used behind this performance is called projection-mapping, where the projector follows the object perfectly, making it seem like a living thing, rather than a sedentary shape. Aside from projection mapping and a bit of human help, the whole project is controlled by robotics and engineering software, coming together to challenge the limits of artistic and technical expression.

If you haven’t already watched the video take a look! Feel yourself get hypnotized by the visual display on your screen. Imagine the endless possibilities of self-expression that can come from this type of technology.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

scienceartanna paluchboxprojectionvideoart and science journalbox & dollyroboticsengineeringsoftwareoptical illusiontechnology
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Darcy Whyte
Darcy Whyte, an inventor/artist, recently came up with drawing robots that can make portraits. Whyte was inspired to create this work after seeing a painting by Chuck Close. 
"He used color juxtaposition to achieve additive color mixing. I believe the color gamut is actually wider than a printing process or RGB monitor so the piece is very striking. The additive mixing combined with a unique color system gives an experience not seen with ordinary mixing of pigment or even textiles. It helped me realize that a painting robot was doable. And worth doing because it could be used explore different color systems and paint application methods. A machine would take care much of the labor content since it could do overnight and could run for days without a rest."
On the way to a painting robot, he came up with one that draws. As Whyte describes how the drawing robot works, 
“The drawing robot moves a pen around a sheet of paper using a pair of motors and strings attached to little spools. The strings actually hold up the pen like a gondola. The motors are controlled by an open source micro-controller called Arduino. Image interpretation is done on a computer running open source software called processing.org. The processing.org environment interprets the jpeg image and comes up with commands to move the motors. Arduino sends the commands to the Arduino which in turn controls the motors through a stepper motor controller.  I’ve written some software for this and have also used some of the other software such as Sandy Nobles Polargraph software.” 
So what’s the next step? Well yesterday Whyte purchased the parts for his first painting robot including linear bearings and some power transmission components. To follow the project, and to learn more about the drawing robot, click here.
- Lee Jones 
Darcy Whyte
Darcy Whyte, an inventor/artist, recently came up with drawing robots that can make portraits. Whyte was inspired to create this work after seeing a painting by Chuck Close. 
"He used color juxtaposition to achieve additive color mixing. I believe the color gamut is actually wider than a printing process or RGB monitor so the piece is very striking. The additive mixing combined with a unique color system gives an experience not seen with ordinary mixing of pigment or even textiles. It helped me realize that a painting robot was doable. And worth doing because it could be used explore different color systems and paint application methods. A machine would take care much of the labor content since it could do overnight and could run for days without a rest."
On the way to a painting robot, he came up with one that draws. As Whyte describes how the drawing robot works, 
“The drawing robot moves a pen around a sheet of paper using a pair of motors and strings attached to little spools. The strings actually hold up the pen like a gondola. The motors are controlled by an open source micro-controller called Arduino. Image interpretation is done on a computer running open source software called processing.org. The processing.org environment interprets the jpeg image and comes up with commands to move the motors. Arduino sends the commands to the Arduino which in turn controls the motors through a stepper motor controller.  I’ve written some software for this and have also used some of the other software such as Sandy Nobles Polargraph software.” 
So what’s the next step? Well yesterday Whyte purchased the parts for his first painting robot including linear bearings and some power transmission components. To follow the project, and to learn more about the drawing robot, click here.
- Lee Jones 
Darcy Whyte
Darcy Whyte, an inventor/artist, recently came up with drawing robots that can make portraits. Whyte was inspired to create this work after seeing a painting by Chuck Close. 
"He used color juxtaposition to achieve additive color mixing. I believe the color gamut is actually wider than a printing process or RGB monitor so the piece is very striking. The additive mixing combined with a unique color system gives an experience not seen with ordinary mixing of pigment or even textiles. It helped me realize that a painting robot was doable. And worth doing because it could be used explore different color systems and paint application methods. A machine would take care much of the labor content since it could do overnight and could run for days without a rest."
On the way to a painting robot, he came up with one that draws. As Whyte describes how the drawing robot works, 
“The drawing robot moves a pen around a sheet of paper using a pair of motors and strings attached to little spools. The strings actually hold up the pen like a gondola. The motors are controlled by an open source micro-controller called Arduino. Image interpretation is done on a computer running open source software called processing.org. The processing.org environment interprets the jpeg image and comes up with commands to move the motors. Arduino sends the commands to the Arduino which in turn controls the motors through a stepper motor controller.  I’ve written some software for this and have also used some of the other software such as Sandy Nobles Polargraph software.” 
So what’s the next step? Well yesterday Whyte purchased the parts for his first painting robot including linear bearings and some power transmission components. To follow the project, and to learn more about the drawing robot, click here.
- Lee Jones 
Darcy Whyte
Darcy Whyte, an inventor/artist, recently came up with drawing robots that can make portraits. Whyte was inspired to create this work after seeing a painting by Chuck Close. 
"He used color juxtaposition to achieve additive color mixing. I believe the color gamut is actually wider than a printing process or RGB monitor so the piece is very striking. The additive mixing combined with a unique color system gives an experience not seen with ordinary mixing of pigment or even textiles. It helped me realize that a painting robot was doable. And worth doing because it could be used explore different color systems and paint application methods. A machine would take care much of the labor content since it could do overnight and could run for days without a rest."
On the way to a painting robot, he came up with one that draws. As Whyte describes how the drawing robot works, 
“The drawing robot moves a pen around a sheet of paper using a pair of motors and strings attached to little spools. The strings actually hold up the pen like a gondola. The motors are controlled by an open source micro-controller called Arduino. Image interpretation is done on a computer running open source software called processing.org. The processing.org environment interprets the jpeg image and comes up with commands to move the motors. Arduino sends the commands to the Arduino which in turn controls the motors through a stepper motor controller.  I’ve written some software for this and have also used some of the other software such as Sandy Nobles Polargraph software.” 
So what’s the next step? Well yesterday Whyte purchased the parts for his first painting robot including linear bearings and some power transmission components. To follow the project, and to learn more about the drawing robot, click here.
- Lee Jones 
Darcy Whyte
Darcy Whyte, an inventor/artist, recently came up with drawing robots that can make portraits. Whyte was inspired to create this work after seeing a painting by Chuck Close. 
"He used color juxtaposition to achieve additive color mixing. I believe the color gamut is actually wider than a printing process or RGB monitor so the piece is very striking. The additive mixing combined with a unique color system gives an experience not seen with ordinary mixing of pigment or even textiles. It helped me realize that a painting robot was doable. And worth doing because it could be used explore different color systems and paint application methods. A machine would take care much of the labor content since it could do overnight and could run for days without a rest."
On the way to a painting robot, he came up with one that draws. As Whyte describes how the drawing robot works, 
“The drawing robot moves a pen around a sheet of paper using a pair of motors and strings attached to little spools. The strings actually hold up the pen like a gondola. The motors are controlled by an open source micro-controller called Arduino. Image interpretation is done on a computer running open source software called processing.org. The processing.org environment interprets the jpeg image and comes up with commands to move the motors. Arduino sends the commands to the Arduino which in turn controls the motors through a stepper motor controller.  I’ve written some software for this and have also used some of the other software such as Sandy Nobles Polargraph software.” 
So what’s the next step? Well yesterday Whyte purchased the parts for his first painting robot including linear bearings and some power transmission components. To follow the project, and to learn more about the drawing robot, click here.
- Lee Jones 

Darcy Whyte

Darcy Whyte, an inventor/artist, recently came up with drawing robots that can make portraits. Whyte was inspired to create this work after seeing a painting by Chuck Close. 

"He used color juxtaposition to achieve additive color mixing. I believe the color gamut is actually wider than a printing process or RGB monitor so the piece is very striking. The additive mixing combined with a unique color system gives an experience not seen with ordinary mixing of pigment or even textiles. It helped me realize that a painting robot was doable. And worth doing because it could be used explore different color systems and paint application methods. A machine would take care much of the labor content since it could do overnight and could run for days without a rest."

On the way to a painting robot, he came up with one that draws. As Whyte describes how the drawing robot works, 

The drawing robot moves a pen around a sheet of paper using a pair of motors and strings attached to little spools. The strings actually hold up the pen like a gondola. The motors are controlled by an open source micro-controller called Arduino. Image interpretation is done on a computer running open source software called processing.org. The processing.org environment interprets the jpeg image and comes up with commands to move the motors. Arduino sends the commands to the Arduino which in turn controls the motors through a stepper motor controller.  I’ve written some software for this and have also used some of the other software such as Sandy Nobles Polargraph software.” 

So what’s the next step? Well yesterday Whyte purchased the parts for his first painting robot including linear bearings and some power transmission components. To follow the project, and to learn more about the drawing robot, click here.

- Lee Jones 

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ art science invention darcy whyte ottawa robot robotics lee jones
STELARC
How long has the man/machine relationship troubled everyone from philosophers, artists and engineers to scientists? If the body is not just a biological given but as susceptible and contingent as anything else, where do we stand in this embodied relation? Better yet, how do we express it? In the era of increased connectivity brought on with the infrastructure of information communication technologies (internet), and the increasing capabilities of science, technology and medicine, new frontiers once only spoken of in science fiction are becoming reality. In light of new horizons, we can and must choose how we conceive of and redesign our bodies. For one thing is clear, as long as there are bodies there will always be a technological relation that is in need of investigation, interpretation and expression. Who could be more appropriate to write about in regards to the man/machine relation other than STELARC—perhaps the progenitor of expressing these new frontiers via the body as the work of art.
For Stelarc, the body is both the site of experiment and the medium of expression between the relationship of technology and the human. In Stelarc’s own words, the artist of the 21st century is one who can become a genetic sculpture working with the body itself and always posing the question what does it mean to be human? Guiding his experiments include ideas of comparative anatomy, evolutionary architecture and the performance and enhancement of the body.
Stelarc’s experiments are no investigation of utilitarian improvements to the body led by a naive post-human Kurzwielian quest. There is no moment of a transcendental uplink of consciousness, a merger with machine where the mind is uploaded as software and the Extropian dream of immortality and endless extension can be lived out. Finally, there is not a concern with categories and meanings that are generally ascribed to the artist e.g. post-human, but the actualizing of ideas through visual and experimental performance. What these performances reveal to us is that for Stelarc, it is the considering of radical and alternative sorts of embodiments and multiple trajectories of the man/machine relation, one not restricted to symbiosis (chimeras) or the body as purely host to technology.
With the insertion of technology into the body, the body is not only enhanced but a richer potent subjective experience is made possible. Take for instance the 3rd Hand Experiment. It is a performance of mixed realities (machine, biological, data based streams and virtual systems)—an overlapping of various modes of operations where new interfaces are engineered. In another performance, Stelarc’s body was connected to muscle stimulators remotely controlled by users on the Internet—users were able to stimulate movement by the click of a mouse. The themes explored in these two performances are what Stelarc calls a Cyborgian construct, where the concern is not the local space that is occupied by the body but a remotely accessible body that performs with a distributed agency across space and time. Alternatively, in the Ear on Arm Project, he had a cell-cultivated ear surgically embedded in his arm (which remains to this day). This allows remote users the accessibility to tune in and listen through his prosthetic ear to the environment that he is experiencing. It is not only a replication of bodily structure or anatomical architecture, but about the remote accessibility of bodies in an era of diminished boundaries and connectivity, where spatiality has paradoxically both increased and decreased.
In pushing the frontiers for contemporary visual, performance and body art, Stelarc challenges our assumptions of human action and agency and asks us to consider what it means to be embodied spatially, whether physically or virtually. His performances also reveal how human action and agency can change with different technological and bodily relations and what the limits could be (if any). By proposing alternate and diverse uses of the body we are forced to confront the reality of its contingency and changeability. Primarily, the artwork of Stelarc leaves us with a vision that there is such a thing possible as a fluid, collaborative, transitive and connective body without organs—a body that can be continuously re-engineered and re-expressed only limited by one’s own vision of what it means to be human. 
Interview with Stelarc here Website here
- Lee-Michael Pronko 
STELARC
How long has the man/machine relationship troubled everyone from philosophers, artists and engineers to scientists? If the body is not just a biological given but as susceptible and contingent as anything else, where do we stand in this embodied relation? Better yet, how do we express it? In the era of increased connectivity brought on with the infrastructure of information communication technologies (internet), and the increasing capabilities of science, technology and medicine, new frontiers once only spoken of in science fiction are becoming reality. In light of new horizons, we can and must choose how we conceive of and redesign our bodies. For one thing is clear, as long as there are bodies there will always be a technological relation that is in need of investigation, interpretation and expression. Who could be more appropriate to write about in regards to the man/machine relation other than STELARC—perhaps the progenitor of expressing these new frontiers via the body as the work of art.
For Stelarc, the body is both the site of experiment and the medium of expression between the relationship of technology and the human. In Stelarc’s own words, the artist of the 21st century is one who can become a genetic sculpture working with the body itself and always posing the question what does it mean to be human? Guiding his experiments include ideas of comparative anatomy, evolutionary architecture and the performance and enhancement of the body.
Stelarc’s experiments are no investigation of utilitarian improvements to the body led by a naive post-human Kurzwielian quest. There is no moment of a transcendental uplink of consciousness, a merger with machine where the mind is uploaded as software and the Extropian dream of immortality and endless extension can be lived out. Finally, there is not a concern with categories and meanings that are generally ascribed to the artist e.g. post-human, but the actualizing of ideas through visual and experimental performance. What these performances reveal to us is that for Stelarc, it is the considering of radical and alternative sorts of embodiments and multiple trajectories of the man/machine relation, one not restricted to symbiosis (chimeras) or the body as purely host to technology.
With the insertion of technology into the body, the body is not only enhanced but a richer potent subjective experience is made possible. Take for instance the 3rd Hand Experiment. It is a performance of mixed realities (machine, biological, data based streams and virtual systems)—an overlapping of various modes of operations where new interfaces are engineered. In another performance, Stelarc’s body was connected to muscle stimulators remotely controlled by users on the Internet—users were able to stimulate movement by the click of a mouse. The themes explored in these two performances are what Stelarc calls a Cyborgian construct, where the concern is not the local space that is occupied by the body but a remotely accessible body that performs with a distributed agency across space and time. Alternatively, in the Ear on Arm Project, he had a cell-cultivated ear surgically embedded in his arm (which remains to this day). This allows remote users the accessibility to tune in and listen through his prosthetic ear to the environment that he is experiencing. It is not only a replication of bodily structure or anatomical architecture, but about the remote accessibility of bodies in an era of diminished boundaries and connectivity, where spatiality has paradoxically both increased and decreased.
In pushing the frontiers for contemporary visual, performance and body art, Stelarc challenges our assumptions of human action and agency and asks us to consider what it means to be embodied spatially, whether physically or virtually. His performances also reveal how human action and agency can change with different technological and bodily relations and what the limits could be (if any). By proposing alternate and diverse uses of the body we are forced to confront the reality of its contingency and changeability. Primarily, the artwork of Stelarc leaves us with a vision that there is such a thing possible as a fluid, collaborative, transitive and connective body without organs—a body that can be continuously re-engineered and re-expressed only limited by one’s own vision of what it means to be human. 
Interview with Stelarc here Website here
- Lee-Michael Pronko 
STELARC
How long has the man/machine relationship troubled everyone from philosophers, artists and engineers to scientists? If the body is not just a biological given but as susceptible and contingent as anything else, where do we stand in this embodied relation? Better yet, how do we express it? In the era of increased connectivity brought on with the infrastructure of information communication technologies (internet), and the increasing capabilities of science, technology and medicine, new frontiers once only spoken of in science fiction are becoming reality. In light of new horizons, we can and must choose how we conceive of and redesign our bodies. For one thing is clear, as long as there are bodies there will always be a technological relation that is in need of investigation, interpretation and expression. Who could be more appropriate to write about in regards to the man/machine relation other than STELARC—perhaps the progenitor of expressing these new frontiers via the body as the work of art.
For Stelarc, the body is both the site of experiment and the medium of expression between the relationship of technology and the human. In Stelarc’s own words, the artist of the 21st century is one who can become a genetic sculpture working with the body itself and always posing the question what does it mean to be human? Guiding his experiments include ideas of comparative anatomy, evolutionary architecture and the performance and enhancement of the body.
Stelarc’s experiments are no investigation of utilitarian improvements to the body led by a naive post-human Kurzwielian quest. There is no moment of a transcendental uplink of consciousness, a merger with machine where the mind is uploaded as software and the Extropian dream of immortality and endless extension can be lived out. Finally, there is not a concern with categories and meanings that are generally ascribed to the artist e.g. post-human, but the actualizing of ideas through visual and experimental performance. What these performances reveal to us is that for Stelarc, it is the considering of radical and alternative sorts of embodiments and multiple trajectories of the man/machine relation, one not restricted to symbiosis (chimeras) or the body as purely host to technology.
With the insertion of technology into the body, the body is not only enhanced but a richer potent subjective experience is made possible. Take for instance the 3rd Hand Experiment. It is a performance of mixed realities (machine, biological, data based streams and virtual systems)—an overlapping of various modes of operations where new interfaces are engineered. In another performance, Stelarc’s body was connected to muscle stimulators remotely controlled by users on the Internet—users were able to stimulate movement by the click of a mouse. The themes explored in these two performances are what Stelarc calls a Cyborgian construct, where the concern is not the local space that is occupied by the body but a remotely accessible body that performs with a distributed agency across space and time. Alternatively, in the Ear on Arm Project, he had a cell-cultivated ear surgically embedded in his arm (which remains to this day). This allows remote users the accessibility to tune in and listen through his prosthetic ear to the environment that he is experiencing. It is not only a replication of bodily structure or anatomical architecture, but about the remote accessibility of bodies in an era of diminished boundaries and connectivity, where spatiality has paradoxically both increased and decreased.
In pushing the frontiers for contemporary visual, performance and body art, Stelarc challenges our assumptions of human action and agency and asks us to consider what it means to be embodied spatially, whether physically or virtually. His performances also reveal how human action and agency can change with different technological and bodily relations and what the limits could be (if any). By proposing alternate and diverse uses of the body we are forced to confront the reality of its contingency and changeability. Primarily, the artwork of Stelarc leaves us with a vision that there is such a thing possible as a fluid, collaborative, transitive and connective body without organs—a body that can be continuously re-engineered and re-expressed only limited by one’s own vision of what it means to be human. 
Interview with Stelarc here Website here
- Lee-Michael Pronko 
STELARC
How long has the man/machine relationship troubled everyone from philosophers, artists and engineers to scientists? If the body is not just a biological given but as susceptible and contingent as anything else, where do we stand in this embodied relation? Better yet, how do we express it? In the era of increased connectivity brought on with the infrastructure of information communication technologies (internet), and the increasing capabilities of science, technology and medicine, new frontiers once only spoken of in science fiction are becoming reality. In light of new horizons, we can and must choose how we conceive of and redesign our bodies. For one thing is clear, as long as there are bodies there will always be a technological relation that is in need of investigation, interpretation and expression. Who could be more appropriate to write about in regards to the man/machine relation other than STELARC—perhaps the progenitor of expressing these new frontiers via the body as the work of art.
For Stelarc, the body is both the site of experiment and the medium of expression between the relationship of technology and the human. In Stelarc’s own words, the artist of the 21st century is one who can become a genetic sculpture working with the body itself and always posing the question what does it mean to be human? Guiding his experiments include ideas of comparative anatomy, evolutionary architecture and the performance and enhancement of the body.
Stelarc’s experiments are no investigation of utilitarian improvements to the body led by a naive post-human Kurzwielian quest. There is no moment of a transcendental uplink of consciousness, a merger with machine where the mind is uploaded as software and the Extropian dream of immortality and endless extension can be lived out. Finally, there is not a concern with categories and meanings that are generally ascribed to the artist e.g. post-human, but the actualizing of ideas through visual and experimental performance. What these performances reveal to us is that for Stelarc, it is the considering of radical and alternative sorts of embodiments and multiple trajectories of the man/machine relation, one not restricted to symbiosis (chimeras) or the body as purely host to technology.
With the insertion of technology into the body, the body is not only enhanced but a richer potent subjective experience is made possible. Take for instance the 3rd Hand Experiment. It is a performance of mixed realities (machine, biological, data based streams and virtual systems)—an overlapping of various modes of operations where new interfaces are engineered. In another performance, Stelarc’s body was connected to muscle stimulators remotely controlled by users on the Internet—users were able to stimulate movement by the click of a mouse. The themes explored in these two performances are what Stelarc calls a Cyborgian construct, where the concern is not the local space that is occupied by the body but a remotely accessible body that performs with a distributed agency across space and time. Alternatively, in the Ear on Arm Project, he had a cell-cultivated ear surgically embedded in his arm (which remains to this day). This allows remote users the accessibility to tune in and listen through his prosthetic ear to the environment that he is experiencing. It is not only a replication of bodily structure or anatomical architecture, but about the remote accessibility of bodies in an era of diminished boundaries and connectivity, where spatiality has paradoxically both increased and decreased.
In pushing the frontiers for contemporary visual, performance and body art, Stelarc challenges our assumptions of human action and agency and asks us to consider what it means to be embodied spatially, whether physically or virtually. His performances also reveal how human action and agency can change with different technological and bodily relations and what the limits could be (if any). By proposing alternate and diverse uses of the body we are forced to confront the reality of its contingency and changeability. Primarily, the artwork of Stelarc leaves us with a vision that there is such a thing possible as a fluid, collaborative, transitive and connective body without organs—a body that can be continuously re-engineered and re-expressed only limited by one’s own vision of what it means to be human. 
Interview with Stelarc here Website here
- Lee-Michael Pronko 
STELARC
How long has the man/machine relationship troubled everyone from philosophers, artists and engineers to scientists? If the body is not just a biological given but as susceptible and contingent as anything else, where do we stand in this embodied relation? Better yet, how do we express it? In the era of increased connectivity brought on with the infrastructure of information communication technologies (internet), and the increasing capabilities of science, technology and medicine, new frontiers once only spoken of in science fiction are becoming reality. In light of new horizons, we can and must choose how we conceive of and redesign our bodies. For one thing is clear, as long as there are bodies there will always be a technological relation that is in need of investigation, interpretation and expression. Who could be more appropriate to write about in regards to the man/machine relation other than STELARC—perhaps the progenitor of expressing these new frontiers via the body as the work of art.
For Stelarc, the body is both the site of experiment and the medium of expression between the relationship of technology and the human. In Stelarc’s own words, the artist of the 21st century is one who can become a genetic sculpture working with the body itself and always posing the question what does it mean to be human? Guiding his experiments include ideas of comparative anatomy, evolutionary architecture and the performance and enhancement of the body.
Stelarc’s experiments are no investigation of utilitarian improvements to the body led by a naive post-human Kurzwielian quest. There is no moment of a transcendental uplink of consciousness, a merger with machine where the mind is uploaded as software and the Extropian dream of immortality and endless extension can be lived out. Finally, there is not a concern with categories and meanings that are generally ascribed to the artist e.g. post-human, but the actualizing of ideas through visual and experimental performance. What these performances reveal to us is that for Stelarc, it is the considering of radical and alternative sorts of embodiments and multiple trajectories of the man/machine relation, one not restricted to symbiosis (chimeras) or the body as purely host to technology.
With the insertion of technology into the body, the body is not only enhanced but a richer potent subjective experience is made possible. Take for instance the 3rd Hand Experiment. It is a performance of mixed realities (machine, biological, data based streams and virtual systems)—an overlapping of various modes of operations where new interfaces are engineered. In another performance, Stelarc’s body was connected to muscle stimulators remotely controlled by users on the Internet—users were able to stimulate movement by the click of a mouse. The themes explored in these two performances are what Stelarc calls a Cyborgian construct, where the concern is not the local space that is occupied by the body but a remotely accessible body that performs with a distributed agency across space and time. Alternatively, in the Ear on Arm Project, he had a cell-cultivated ear surgically embedded in his arm (which remains to this day). This allows remote users the accessibility to tune in and listen through his prosthetic ear to the environment that he is experiencing. It is not only a replication of bodily structure or anatomical architecture, but about the remote accessibility of bodies in an era of diminished boundaries and connectivity, where spatiality has paradoxically both increased and decreased.
In pushing the frontiers for contemporary visual, performance and body art, Stelarc challenges our assumptions of human action and agency and asks us to consider what it means to be embodied spatially, whether physically or virtually. His performances also reveal how human action and agency can change with different technological and bodily relations and what the limits could be (if any). By proposing alternate and diverse uses of the body we are forced to confront the reality of its contingency and changeability. Primarily, the artwork of Stelarc leaves us with a vision that there is such a thing possible as a fluid, collaborative, transitive and connective body without organs—a body that can be continuously re-engineered and re-expressed only limited by one’s own vision of what it means to be human. 
Interview with Stelarc here Website here
- Lee-Michael Pronko 

STELARC

How long has the man/machine relationship troubled everyone from philosophers, artists and engineers to scientists? If the body is not just a biological given but as susceptible and contingent as anything else, where do we stand in this embodied relation? Better yet, how do we express it? In the era of increased connectivity brought on with the infrastructure of information communication technologies (internet), and the increasing capabilities of science, technology and medicine, new frontiers once only spoken of in science fiction are becoming reality. In light of new horizons, we can and must choose how we conceive of and redesign our bodies. For one thing is clear, as long as there are bodies there will always be a technological relation that is in need of investigation, interpretation and expression. Who could be more appropriate to write about in regards to the man/machine relation other than STELARC—perhaps the progenitor of expressing these new frontiers via the body as the work of art.

For Stelarc, the body is both the site of experiment and the medium of expression between the relationship of technology and the human. In Stelarc’s own words, the artist of the 21st century is one who can become a genetic sculpture working with the body itself and always posing the question what does it mean to be human? Guiding his experiments include ideas of comparative anatomy, evolutionary architecture and the performance and enhancement of the body.

Stelarc’s experiments are no investigation of utilitarian improvements to the body led by a naive post-human Kurzwielian quest. There is no moment of a transcendental uplink of consciousness, a merger with machine where the mind is uploaded as software and the Extropian dream of immortality and endless extension can be lived out. Finally, there is not a concern with categories and meanings that are generally ascribed to the artist e.g. post-human, but the actualizing of ideas through visual and experimental performance. What these performances reveal to us is that for Stelarc, it is the considering of radical and alternative sorts of embodiments and multiple trajectories of the man/machine relation, one not restricted to symbiosis (chimeras) or the body as purely host to technology.

With the insertion of technology into the body, the body is not only enhanced but a richer potent subjective experience is made possible. Take for instance the 3rd Hand Experiment. It is a performance of mixed realities (machine, biological, data based streams and virtual systems)—an overlapping of various modes of operations where new interfaces are engineered. In another performance, Stelarc’s body was connected to muscle stimulators remotely controlled by users on the Internet—users were able to stimulate movement by the click of a mouse. The themes explored in these two performances are what Stelarc calls a Cyborgian construct, where the concern is not the local space that is occupied by the body but a remotely accessible body that performs with a distributed agency across space and time. Alternatively, in the Ear on Arm Project, he had a cell-cultivated ear surgically embedded in his arm (which remains to this day). This allows remote users the accessibility to tune in and listen through his prosthetic ear to the environment that he is experiencing. It is not only a replication of bodily structure or anatomical architecture, but about the remote accessibility of bodies in an era of diminished boundaries and connectivity, where spatiality has paradoxically both increased and decreased.

In pushing the frontiers for contemporary visual, performance and body art, Stelarc challenges our assumptions of human action and agency and asks us to consider what it means to be embodied spatially, whether physically or virtually. His performances also reveal how human action and agency can change with different technological and bodily relations and what the limits could be (if any). By proposing alternate and diverse uses of the body we are forced to confront the reality of its contingency and changeability. Primarily, the artwork of Stelarc leaves us with a vision that there is such a thing possible as a fluid, collaborative, transitive and connective body without organs—a body that can be continuously re-engineered and re-expressed only limited by one’s own vision of what it means to be human. 

Interview with Stelarc here Website here

5 Photos
/ Technology Robotics Performance & Visual Art Bio-Art Body Augmentation Science Stelarc Evolution Spatiality
Wim Delvoye and Cloaca
I promised more Delvoye, and here we have him. If you hadn’t already noticed, he is all over the map. Last time on A&SJ, we checked out his x-ray stained glass. This time, we’re looking at his Cloaca factory - a collection of machines that he has modelled after the human digestive tract, which mimic the process of digestion and turn food into excrement. 
In addition to exhibiting his machines in action, Delvoye also sells packaged Cloaca. Treating Cloaca as a consumer product, he has designed a series of logos for this brand, which play with the iconography of companies such as Ford, Mr.Clean, and Chanel. 
Many feel that this installation comes off as gimmicky and perverted, but I believe  it raises several timely concerns. To name a few: it challenges excessive commoditization, it toys with the possibility of replicating the human body, and it forces us to consider the intricacies of our physical existence. 
For more images, visit Delvoye’s site. For an excellent review of the installation, read Els Fiers’ A Human Masterpiece.
- Melissa
Wim Delvoye and Cloaca
I promised more Delvoye, and here we have him. If you hadn’t already noticed, he is all over the map. Last time on A&SJ, we checked out his x-ray stained glass. This time, we’re looking at his Cloaca factory - a collection of machines that he has modelled after the human digestive tract, which mimic the process of digestion and turn food into excrement. 
In addition to exhibiting his machines in action, Delvoye also sells packaged Cloaca. Treating Cloaca as a consumer product, he has designed a series of logos for this brand, which play with the iconography of companies such as Ford, Mr.Clean, and Chanel. 
Many feel that this installation comes off as gimmicky and perverted, but I believe  it raises several timely concerns. To name a few: it challenges excessive commoditization, it toys with the possibility of replicating the human body, and it forces us to consider the intricacies of our physical existence. 
For more images, visit Delvoye’s site. For an excellent review of the installation, read Els Fiers’ A Human Masterpiece.
- Melissa
Wim Delvoye and Cloaca
I promised more Delvoye, and here we have him. If you hadn’t already noticed, he is all over the map. Last time on A&SJ, we checked out his x-ray stained glass. This time, we’re looking at his Cloaca factory - a collection of machines that he has modelled after the human digestive tract, which mimic the process of digestion and turn food into excrement. 
In addition to exhibiting his machines in action, Delvoye also sells packaged Cloaca. Treating Cloaca as a consumer product, he has designed a series of logos for this brand, which play with the iconography of companies such as Ford, Mr.Clean, and Chanel. 
Many feel that this installation comes off as gimmicky and perverted, but I believe  it raises several timely concerns. To name a few: it challenges excessive commoditization, it toys with the possibility of replicating the human body, and it forces us to consider the intricacies of our physical existence. 
For more images, visit Delvoye’s site. For an excellent review of the installation, read Els Fiers’ A Human Masterpiece.
- Melissa
Wim Delvoye and Cloaca
I promised more Delvoye, and here we have him. If you hadn’t already noticed, he is all over the map. Last time on A&SJ, we checked out his x-ray stained glass. This time, we’re looking at his Cloaca factory - a collection of machines that he has modelled after the human digestive tract, which mimic the process of digestion and turn food into excrement. 
In addition to exhibiting his machines in action, Delvoye also sells packaged Cloaca. Treating Cloaca as a consumer product, he has designed a series of logos for this brand, which play with the iconography of companies such as Ford, Mr.Clean, and Chanel. 
Many feel that this installation comes off as gimmicky and perverted, but I believe  it raises several timely concerns. To name a few: it challenges excessive commoditization, it toys with the possibility of replicating the human body, and it forces us to consider the intricacies of our physical existence. 
For more images, visit Delvoye’s site. For an excellent review of the installation, read Els Fiers’ A Human Masterpiece.
- Melissa

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