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Globalizing the Tag
 You couldn’t necessarily call him a cyborg, or a magician, but artist Alex Kiessling has managed to use robotic arms to create artworks in three separate cities simultaneously. The project, called Long Distance Art, incorporates satellite feeds and industrial robots, acting as an extension of the artist’s hand around the globe. While Kiessling himself was drawing and painting in Vienna, the robots physically mimicked him in London and Berlin.
The piece itself sets up an interesting dialogue between street artists and telepresence. By introducing communications technology into his art practice, Kiessling has raised the bar of the mobility of street art, altering the context of graffiti to that of a global scale. He is also broadcasting and globalizing his own personal ‘tag’, or his identity as a street artist. The robots have allowed him to transcend the confines of space and location, making living in the city whose streets are the canvas unnecessary. As robots and technology become more available and affordable, it becomes easier for an artist to replicate this identity through their artwork. Kiessling’s project also marks an historic moment for graffiti itself by being able to extend the sociopolitical power of graffiti into separate cultural contexts. 
To view a video of the project in action, click here.
- Lea Hamilton
Globalizing the Tag
 You couldn’t necessarily call him a cyborg, or a magician, but artist Alex Kiessling has managed to use robotic arms to create artworks in three separate cities simultaneously. The project, called Long Distance Art, incorporates satellite feeds and industrial robots, acting as an extension of the artist’s hand around the globe. While Kiessling himself was drawing and painting in Vienna, the robots physically mimicked him in London and Berlin.
The piece itself sets up an interesting dialogue between street artists and telepresence. By introducing communications technology into his art practice, Kiessling has raised the bar of the mobility of street art, altering the context of graffiti to that of a global scale. He is also broadcasting and globalizing his own personal ‘tag’, or his identity as a street artist. The robots have allowed him to transcend the confines of space and location, making living in the city whose streets are the canvas unnecessary. As robots and technology become more available and affordable, it becomes easier for an artist to replicate this identity through their artwork. Kiessling’s project also marks an historic moment for graffiti itself by being able to extend the sociopolitical power of graffiti into separate cultural contexts. 
To view a video of the project in action, click here.
- Lea Hamilton
Globalizing the Tag
 You couldn’t necessarily call him a cyborg, or a magician, but artist Alex Kiessling has managed to use robotic arms to create artworks in three separate cities simultaneously. The project, called Long Distance Art, incorporates satellite feeds and industrial robots, acting as an extension of the artist’s hand around the globe. While Kiessling himself was drawing and painting in Vienna, the robots physically mimicked him in London and Berlin.
The piece itself sets up an interesting dialogue between street artists and telepresence. By introducing communications technology into his art practice, Kiessling has raised the bar of the mobility of street art, altering the context of graffiti to that of a global scale. He is also broadcasting and globalizing his own personal ‘tag’, or his identity as a street artist. The robots have allowed him to transcend the confines of space and location, making living in the city whose streets are the canvas unnecessary. As robots and technology become more available and affordable, it becomes easier for an artist to replicate this identity through their artwork. Kiessling’s project also marks an historic moment for graffiti itself by being able to extend the sociopolitical power of graffiti into separate cultural contexts. 
To view a video of the project in action, click here.
- Lea Hamilton

Globalizing the Tag

 You couldn’t necessarily call him a cyborg, or a magician, but artist Alex Kiessling has managed to use robotic arms to create artworks in three separate cities simultaneously. The project, called Long Distance Art, incorporates satellite feeds and industrial robots, acting as an extension of the artist’s hand around the globe. While Kiessling himself was drawing and painting in Vienna, the robots physically mimicked him in London and Berlin.

The piece itself sets up an interesting dialogue between street artists and telepresence. By introducing communications technology into his art practice, Kiessling has raised the bar of the mobility of street art, altering the context of graffiti to that of a global scale. He is also broadcasting and globalizing his own personal ‘tag’, or his identity as a street artist. The robots have allowed him to transcend the confines of space and location, making living in the city whose streets are the canvas unnecessary. As robots and technology become more available and affordable, it becomes easier for an artist to replicate this identity through their artwork. Kiessling’s project also marks an historic moment for graffiti itself by being able to extend the sociopolitical power of graffiti into separate cultural contexts. 

To view a video of the project in action, click here.

- Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

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Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones
Vincent Fournier
In this series The Man Machine Vincent Fournier documents current robotic technologies from all over the world. In his works, he is interested in how fiction is become reality. As he states,
"My work was fed with the world of childhood, with some sort of buried memory where reality and fiction are becoming confused, even merge somehow, a world in which things don’t even have a name yet. I remember stories which could have existed, stories in which the truth is dangerously flirting with the false, all together serious and absurd, amusing and disquieting, past or future."
His photographs focus on narrative. We can see this in the robots playing with children or the robots sitting in an office. Immediately we create a story of a robot living a very human life. Yet at the same time the settings and environments show a futuristic world that is also recognizable as our own. As Fournier states, ”What I find extremely appealing is the aesthetic world of science, machines, geometric patterns.” These scenes look futuristic, yet they are now. To see more of his works. click here. 
- Lee Jones

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