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Art as Aftershock
Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.
Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.
In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.
Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well. 
Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.
-Anna Paluch
Art as Aftershock
Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.
Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.
In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.
Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well. 
Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.
-Anna Paluch
Art as Aftershock
Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.
Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.
In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.
Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well. 
Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.
-Anna Paluch
Art as Aftershock
Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.
Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.
In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.
Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well. 
Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.
-Anna Paluch

Art as Aftershock

Earthquakes are dangerous phenomena, yet two artists chose to present these natural disasters, in a way that makes viewers contemplate, rather than fear them.

Luke Jerram and Carlos Amorales created works that comment on the 2011 Japanese Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami, and 1985 earthquake in Mexico City, respectively. Their works allow viewers to contemplate the nature of earthquakes with the help of visualizations through seismographic data.

In Jerram’s piece, the artist took the seismographic data from the Tōhoku earthquake, and rotated it using a computer program to see the data in three-dimensions, later printing it in those dimensions. The sculpture, made in 2011, represents nine minutes of the earthquake, allowing viewers to calculate, and imagine, the severity of the disaster on their own.

Amorales approaches the 1985 earthquake in a more theoretical presentation, in “Vertical Earthquake” (2010). Rather than using data, the artist creates his own fault lines and cracks on the walls, drawing epicentres around each. The artist chose to capture the chaos and emotion of the event. Within the installation, newspaper clippings of the disaster are displayed, with fault lines drawn on them as well.

Where Jerram uses data to help visualize the severity of the earthquake in Japan, Morales plays with drama and emotion, creating a fragmented image which symbolically reflects the earthquake that he witnessed. Both pieces however, are sobering reminders of the immense power our Earth has over man-made constructions.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ Luke Jerram Carlos Amorales anna paluch seismograph seismogam earthquake art science art and science journal sculpture installation Tohoko japan earthquake mexico city earthquake
Reimagined Ecosystems
Coral reefs come in many shapes, sizes and colours. Not only are they important to the oceans, but to the environment as a whole. Acting as the ‘rainforests of the sea’, coral reefs are home to a large array of diverse animals and plants, as well as being natural breakwaters which help to minimize the impact and damage from natural disasters such as cyclones. Coral reefs are not only beautiful, they are essentially life-sustaining, providing shelter for animals, which then feed people living near the reefs.
Artists that look to reefs for inspiration in their work include Courtney Mattison and Jane Ladan. 
In Mattison’s show Our Changing Seas III, the artist creates large scale ceramic coral reef sculptures, some white and some coloured, in order to show the effects that global warming has on the reefs. The vibrant reefs begin to be swallowed up by the bleached, dying reefs. The artist hopes that her work can influence others to act fast to protect the reefs while there is still time to save the living ones, and hopefully restore the bleached reefs to their once vibrant and life-sustaining selves. 
Jane Ladan works with the colours of these reefs to create her wearable art. The Mauritius-born artist, who is based in Ottawa, creates works that celebrate the rich colours and textures that are found in nature. She also uses Mauritius’ unique cultural blend, with influences coming from countries such as China and India, and its environment, mixing exotic flowers with undersea foliage, to help shape how she expresses herself creatively.
Where Mattison creates work to encourage preservation, Ladan creates work with a similar theme, in the sense that the beauty of her pieces should be seen as a reminder of the beauty of all natural things; in order to keep appreciating this beauty, we must do our part to help preserve it. 
-Anna Paluch
Reimagined Ecosystems
Coral reefs come in many shapes, sizes and colours. Not only are they important to the oceans, but to the environment as a whole. Acting as the ‘rainforests of the sea’, coral reefs are home to a large array of diverse animals and plants, as well as being natural breakwaters which help to minimize the impact and damage from natural disasters such as cyclones. Coral reefs are not only beautiful, they are essentially life-sustaining, providing shelter for animals, which then feed people living near the reefs.
Artists that look to reefs for inspiration in their work include Courtney Mattison and Jane Ladan. 
In Mattison’s show Our Changing Seas III, the artist creates large scale ceramic coral reef sculptures, some white and some coloured, in order to show the effects that global warming has on the reefs. The vibrant reefs begin to be swallowed up by the bleached, dying reefs. The artist hopes that her work can influence others to act fast to protect the reefs while there is still time to save the living ones, and hopefully restore the bleached reefs to their once vibrant and life-sustaining selves. 
Jane Ladan works with the colours of these reefs to create her wearable art. The Mauritius-born artist, who is based in Ottawa, creates works that celebrate the rich colours and textures that are found in nature. She also uses Mauritius’ unique cultural blend, with influences coming from countries such as China and India, and its environment, mixing exotic flowers with undersea foliage, to help shape how she expresses herself creatively.
Where Mattison creates work to encourage preservation, Ladan creates work with a similar theme, in the sense that the beauty of her pieces should be seen as a reminder of the beauty of all natural things; in order to keep appreciating this beauty, we must do our part to help preserve it. 
-Anna Paluch

Reimagined Ecosystems

Coral reefs come in many shapes, sizes and colours. Not only are they important to the oceans, but to the environment as a whole. Acting as the ‘rainforests of the sea’, coral reefs are home to a large array of diverse animals and plants, as well as being natural breakwaters which help to minimize the impact and damage from natural disasters such as cyclones. Coral reefs are not only beautiful, they are essentially life-sustaining, providing shelter for animals, which then feed people living near the reefs.

Artists that look to reefs for inspiration in their work include Courtney Mattison and Jane Ladan.

In Mattison’s show Our Changing Seas III, the artist creates large scale ceramic coral reef sculptures, some white and some coloured, in order to show the effects that global warming has on the reefs. The vibrant reefs begin to be swallowed up by the bleached, dying reefs. The artist hopes that her work can influence others to act fast to protect the reefs while there is still time to save the living ones, and hopefully restore the bleached reefs to their once vibrant and life-sustaining selves.

Jane Ladan works with the colours of these reefs to create her wearable art. The Mauritius-born artist, who is based in Ottawa, creates works that celebrate the rich colours and textures that are found in nature. She also uses Mauritius’ unique cultural blend, with influences coming from countries such as China and India, and its environment, mixing exotic flowers with undersea foliage, to help shape how she expresses herself creatively.

Where Mattison creates work to encourage preservation, Ladan creates work with a similar theme, in the sense that the beauty of her pieces should be seen as a reminder of the beauty of all natural things; in order to keep appreciating this beauty, we must do our part to help preserve it.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ jane ladan courtney mattison anna paluch coral reefs oceans nature art science art and science journal sculpture reefs sea seas ocean ecosystem Environment fashion conservation
Shadow Play
With the help of geometric sculptures, artist Fabrizio Corneli constructs intricate shadow-images. The artist plays with light and its reflective abilities to create human faces, animals and geometric patterns. It may seem like the artist’s work is made by simply cutting a stencil into a metal object, but the artist’s shadow pieces are actually made by placing specifically shaped, abstract metal objects on the projection surface, with the light bouncing off and through those objects, to cast shadows which mimic features such as eyes, mouths, or even a girl on a swing.
The end result is an intangible piece of art; yes, the sculptural elements are tangible, but the image, the actual focus of the piece cannot be touched without distorting it, nor can it be seen without the use of light.
With the help of mathematics, the artist is able to carefully position his abstract sculptures in a way that will optimally project the result of the light reflection. As the artist states, “light is energy which creates form”; all the artist has to do is create a vessel into which light can travel, and then step back, to allow the light itself to form its own work of art. Light not only reveals the shape, but also creates it.
The results are almost like non-images, as in, the shadows on the walls are residues of what should be there, or was there, or could be. The images create an environment of the anamorphosis, combining science and poetry, mathematics and art.

-Anna Paluch
Shadow Play
With the help of geometric sculptures, artist Fabrizio Corneli constructs intricate shadow-images. The artist plays with light and its reflective abilities to create human faces, animals and geometric patterns. It may seem like the artist’s work is made by simply cutting a stencil into a metal object, but the artist’s shadow pieces are actually made by placing specifically shaped, abstract metal objects on the projection surface, with the light bouncing off and through those objects, to cast shadows which mimic features such as eyes, mouths, or even a girl on a swing.
The end result is an intangible piece of art; yes, the sculptural elements are tangible, but the image, the actual focus of the piece cannot be touched without distorting it, nor can it be seen without the use of light.
With the help of mathematics, the artist is able to carefully position his abstract sculptures in a way that will optimally project the result of the light reflection. As the artist states, “light is energy which creates form”; all the artist has to do is create a vessel into which light can travel, and then step back, to allow the light itself to form its own work of art. Light not only reveals the shape, but also creates it.
The results are almost like non-images, as in, the shadows on the walls are residues of what should be there, or was there, or could be. The images create an environment of the anamorphosis, combining science and poetry, mathematics and art.

-Anna Paluch

Shadow Play

With the help of geometric sculptures, artist Fabrizio Corneli constructs intricate shadow-images. The artist plays with light and its reflective abilities to create human faces, animals and geometric patterns. It may seem like the artist’s work is made by simply cutting a stencil into a metal object, but the artist’s shadow pieces are actually made by placing specifically shaped, abstract metal objects on the projection surface, with the light bouncing off and through those objects, to cast shadows which mimic features such as eyes, mouths, or even a girl on a swing.

The end result is an intangible piece of art; yes, the sculptural elements are tangible, but the image, the actual focus of the piece cannot be touched without distorting it, nor can it be seen without the use of light.

With the help of mathematics, the artist is able to carefully position his abstract sculptures in a way that will optimally project the result of the light reflection. As the artist states, “light is energy which creates form”; all the artist has to do is create a vessel into which light can travel, and then step back, to allow the light itself to form its own work of art. Light not only reveals the shape, but also creates it.

The results are almost like non-images, as in, the shadows on the walls are residues of what should be there, or was there, or could be. The images create an environment of the anamorphosis, combining science and poetry, mathematics and art.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ fabrizio corneli anna paluch optics light shadow sculpture art science art and science journal

Andrew O’Malley’s Light Sculptures

Some artists may find it difficult to create works that truly engage an audience, but Ottawa artist Andrew O’Malley is not one of them. His lighting works are playful and entertaining, combining finely crafted cases, hand-built electronics, and custom programming to create pieces that evolve in front of our eyes; like ‘living’, electronic sculptures.

The artist is fascinated with the rules of programming, and how even something structured can create random results. A light box may be programmed to change colours at certain times periods, but the fun part is seeing what colours the program will choose. It helps too that the artist studied electrical engineering, allowing him to have the knowledge behind the science in order to express programs and circuits creatively through art. 

One of Andrew’s pieces, Electric Window 4 (2009), uses sixteen LED lights to create gradient effects between light intensities, as well as transitions and patterns. The work is always changing; instead of having people stare at the same image, different viewers see a different art piece. The pattern that one person saw first, is different to what another person will see first, and this dynamic art piece allows for diverse conversation and understanding of the art.

If you would like to see some of Andrew’s pieces in person, he is represented by Cube Gallery in Ottawa, where they not only have a collection of his light boxes, but also a DOTKLOK (2010)!

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

andrew o'malleyanna paluchlightlight boxeselectronicslocalOttawaCube Galleryartscienceart and science journalsculpture
Bobby Jaber’s chemistry Porcelainia

 “Chemistry is the study of changes in matter. More than any other art form, ceramics dramatically demonstrates chemical change, especially at the physical level.”
 
American artist Bobby Jaber retired from teaching chemistry over 20 years ago, with the desire to create art that drew on his roots as a science educator. He chose to become a clay sculptor in his retirement, and his art gained attention for its shapes that mimic molecules and molecular structures. His favourite shape to work with is the truncated icosahedron, a shape that reveals itself to look like the carbon 60 molecule. The carbon 60 molecule is often known as the most beautiful of the molecules due to this spherical shape.
 
Jaber’s choice in using the medium of clay cleverly places emphasis on chemistry to further link together science and art. Clay is a form of earth with unique chemical qualities. The processes that a piece of clay undergoes in its life, to become a sculpture, is a microcosm where we can see some of science’s overarching laws: equilibrium, entropy, force, steady states, and closed systems. Jaber outlines these connections between the laws of physics and chemistry, and his own processes, on his website.
  
Now at age 76, Jaber appears to be quite philosophically reflective about his process and what it has meant to the last 20 years of his life: “It’s not what you start with or what you end up with, but it’s what lies between the beginning and the end that is the meaning of the whole act of creation… and you never finish anything perfectly…”
 

Jaber calls his approach to pottery making the ‘octahedral approach’, and hopes other potential sculptors can follow and enjoy the process as much as he does.  

- alinta krauth
Bobby Jaber’s chemistry Porcelainia

 “Chemistry is the study of changes in matter. More than any other art form, ceramics dramatically demonstrates chemical change, especially at the physical level.”
 
American artist Bobby Jaber retired from teaching chemistry over 20 years ago, with the desire to create art that drew on his roots as a science educator. He chose to become a clay sculptor in his retirement, and his art gained attention for its shapes that mimic molecules and molecular structures. His favourite shape to work with is the truncated icosahedron, a shape that reveals itself to look like the carbon 60 molecule. The carbon 60 molecule is often known as the most beautiful of the molecules due to this spherical shape.
 
Jaber’s choice in using the medium of clay cleverly places emphasis on chemistry to further link together science and art. Clay is a form of earth with unique chemical qualities. The processes that a piece of clay undergoes in its life, to become a sculpture, is a microcosm where we can see some of science’s overarching laws: equilibrium, entropy, force, steady states, and closed systems. Jaber outlines these connections between the laws of physics and chemistry, and his own processes, on his website.
  
Now at age 76, Jaber appears to be quite philosophically reflective about his process and what it has meant to the last 20 years of his life: “It’s not what you start with or what you end up with, but it’s what lies between the beginning and the end that is the meaning of the whole act of creation… and you never finish anything perfectly…”
 

Jaber calls his approach to pottery making the ‘octahedral approach’, and hopes other potential sculptors can follow and enjoy the process as much as he does.  

- alinta krauth
Bobby Jaber’s chemistry Porcelainia

 “Chemistry is the study of changes in matter. More than any other art form, ceramics dramatically demonstrates chemical change, especially at the physical level.”
 
American artist Bobby Jaber retired from teaching chemistry over 20 years ago, with the desire to create art that drew on his roots as a science educator. He chose to become a clay sculptor in his retirement, and his art gained attention for its shapes that mimic molecules and molecular structures. His favourite shape to work with is the truncated icosahedron, a shape that reveals itself to look like the carbon 60 molecule. The carbon 60 molecule is often known as the most beautiful of the molecules due to this spherical shape.
 
Jaber’s choice in using the medium of clay cleverly places emphasis on chemistry to further link together science and art. Clay is a form of earth with unique chemical qualities. The processes that a piece of clay undergoes in its life, to become a sculpture, is a microcosm where we can see some of science’s overarching laws: equilibrium, entropy, force, steady states, and closed systems. Jaber outlines these connections between the laws of physics and chemistry, and his own processes, on his website.
  
Now at age 76, Jaber appears to be quite philosophically reflective about his process and what it has meant to the last 20 years of his life: “It’s not what you start with or what you end up with, but it’s what lies between the beginning and the end that is the meaning of the whole act of creation… and you never finish anything perfectly…”
 

Jaber calls his approach to pottery making the ‘octahedral approach’, and hopes other potential sculptors can follow and enjoy the process as much as he does.  

- alinta krauth

Bobby Jaber’s chemistry Porcelainia

 “Chemistry is the study of changes in matter. More than any other art form, ceramics dramatically demonstrates chemical change, especially at the physical level.”

 

American artist Bobby Jaber retired from teaching chemistry over 20 years ago, with the desire to create art that drew on his roots as a science educator. He chose to become a clay sculptor in his retirement, and his art gained attention for its shapes that mimic molecules and molecular structures. His favourite shape to work with is the truncated icosahedron, a shape that reveals itself to look like the carbon 60 molecule. The carbon 60 molecule is often known as the most beautiful of the molecules due to this spherical shape.

 

Jaber’s choice in using the medium of clay cleverly places emphasis on chemistry to further link together science and art. Clay is a form of earth with unique chemical qualities. The processes that a piece of clay undergoes in its life, to become a sculpture, is a microcosm where we can see some of science’s overarching laws: equilibrium, entropy, force, steady states, and closed systems. Jaber outlines these connections between the laws of physics and chemistry, and his own processes, on his website.

  

Now at age 76, Jaber appears to be quite philosophically reflective about his process and what it has meant to the last 20 years of his life: “It’s not what you start with or what you end up with, but it’s what lies between the beginning and the end that is the meaning of the whole act of creation… and you never finish anything perfectly…”

 

Jaber calls his approach to pottery making the ‘octahedral approach’, and hopes other potential sculptors can follow and enjoy the process as much as he does.  

- alinta krauth

3 Photos
/ art science art and science bobby jaber ceramics pottery clay chemistry physics alinta krauth retirement process molecule molecular philosophical porcelain porcelainia sculptor sculpture
Glass Engineering
Watch your step next time you go to an exhibition space with artist Andy Paiko’s work, because it is all made out of glass. Whether it is an mere aesthetic piece or one that is functional, Paiko is able to create amazing sculptures that are gorgeously intricate in design. The artist’s work includes hourglasses, with real sand pouring through them, and even hanging pieces that look like giant Christmas ornaments. 
Paiko’s other work, however, is what really makes this artist stand out. Some of his glass pieces are functional items, combining engineering with art. The work Transference (2009) is a collaborative piece that combines glass and sound to create a kinetic-sound installation reinterpreting the glass armonica. Other pieces include a fully functioning glass seismograph, and even a spinning wheel. His work not only combines beauty and form, but precise mathematics in design.
-Anna Paluch
Glass Engineering
Watch your step next time you go to an exhibition space with artist Andy Paiko’s work, because it is all made out of glass. Whether it is an mere aesthetic piece or one that is functional, Paiko is able to create amazing sculptures that are gorgeously intricate in design. The artist’s work includes hourglasses, with real sand pouring through them, and even hanging pieces that look like giant Christmas ornaments. 
Paiko’s other work, however, is what really makes this artist stand out. Some of his glass pieces are functional items, combining engineering with art. The work Transference (2009) is a collaborative piece that combines glass and sound to create a kinetic-sound installation reinterpreting the glass armonica. Other pieces include a fully functioning glass seismograph, and even a spinning wheel. His work not only combines beauty and form, but precise mathematics in design.
-Anna Paluch
Glass Engineering
Watch your step next time you go to an exhibition space with artist Andy Paiko’s work, because it is all made out of glass. Whether it is an mere aesthetic piece or one that is functional, Paiko is able to create amazing sculptures that are gorgeously intricate in design. The artist’s work includes hourglasses, with real sand pouring through them, and even hanging pieces that look like giant Christmas ornaments. 
Paiko’s other work, however, is what really makes this artist stand out. Some of his glass pieces are functional items, combining engineering with art. The work Transference (2009) is a collaborative piece that combines glass and sound to create a kinetic-sound installation reinterpreting the glass armonica. Other pieces include a fully functioning glass seismograph, and even a spinning wheel. His work not only combines beauty and form, but precise mathematics in design.
-Anna Paluch

Glass Engineering

Watch your step next time you go to an exhibition space with artist Andy Paiko’s work, because it is all made out of glass. Whether it is an mere aesthetic piece or one that is functional, Paiko is able to create amazing sculptures that are gorgeously intricate in design. The artist’s work includes hourglasses, with real sand pouring through them, and even hanging pieces that look like giant Christmas ornaments. 

Paiko’s other work, however, is what really makes this artist stand out. Some of his glass pieces are functional items, combining engineering with art. The work Transference (2009) is a collaborative piece that combines glass and sound to create a kinetic-sound installation reinterpreting the glass armonica. Other pieces include a fully functioning glass seismograph, and even a spinning wheel. His work not only combines beauty and form, but precise mathematics in design.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ glass sculpture glass sculpture engineering art and science journal art science anna paluch andy paiko
Body of Constructs

The sculptural works of James Roper are assembled in a way that they almost look like exploding micro-organisms, frozen in time. His work Construct which is part of his greater installation work Chaosmos II (2011) and Into the Fold (2005-2008) seems to play on the ideas of chaos within the vast microbiological world. Many of Roper’s works focus on the complex structures of the human body, by assembling small triangular pieces, to create a spherical shape, which is then combined to create a larger shape. This process is reminiscent of fractals, starting from small basic shapes, evolving into a more defined concept.
The artwork is a burst of energy, a quality often found in the artists’ works. The spontaneity of composition and colour, play with possibilities; is this random representation of form, or could it be a leaf cell, a human cell, maybe even a rock molecule?
-Anna Paluch
Body of Constructs

The sculptural works of James Roper are assembled in a way that they almost look like exploding micro-organisms, frozen in time. His work Construct which is part of his greater installation work Chaosmos II (2011) and Into the Fold (2005-2008) seems to play on the ideas of chaos within the vast microbiological world. Many of Roper’s works focus on the complex structures of the human body, by assembling small triangular pieces, to create a spherical shape, which is then combined to create a larger shape. This process is reminiscent of fractals, starting from small basic shapes, evolving into a more defined concept.
The artwork is a burst of energy, a quality often found in the artists’ works. The spontaneity of composition and colour, play with possibilities; is this random representation of form, or could it be a leaf cell, a human cell, maybe even a rock molecule?
-Anna Paluch

Body of Constructs

The sculptural works of James Roper are assembled in a way that they almost look like exploding micro-organisms, frozen in time. His work Construct which is part of his greater installation work Chaosmos II (2011) and Into the Fold (2005-2008) seems to play on the ideas of chaos within the vast microbiological world. Many of Roper’s works focus on the complex structures of the human body, by assembling small triangular pieces, to create a spherical shape, which is then combined to create a larger shape. This process is reminiscent of fractals, starting from small basic shapes, evolving into a more defined concept.

The artwork is a burst of energy, a quality often found in the artists’ works. The spontaneity of composition and colour, play with possibilities; is this random representation of form, or could it be a leaf cell, a human cell, maybe even a rock molecule?

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ anna paluch james roper fractal cells sculpture biology micro-organism human body art science art and science journal
Rogan Brown’s Paper Sculptures
Through his delicate paper sculptures, Rogan Brown expresses his fascination with the intricacy of the natural world. Drawing inspiration from scientific illustrations, Brown’s hand-cut pieces do not represent a single organism, but reflect themes found in nature. The patterns that Brown searches for exist in different scales, ranging from single cells to large geological formations.
Although each project is incredibly time consuming, Brown states that the amount of time spent on each sculpture is part of its meaning. Certainly, thinking about how much labour goes in to each piece leaves you in awe. The artist states that he chose paper as his medium because “it captures perfectly that mixture of delicacy and durability that for me characterizes the natural world” (Rogan Brown).
-Janine Truong
Rogan Brown’s Paper Sculptures
Through his delicate paper sculptures, Rogan Brown expresses his fascination with the intricacy of the natural world. Drawing inspiration from scientific illustrations, Brown’s hand-cut pieces do not represent a single organism, but reflect themes found in nature. The patterns that Brown searches for exist in different scales, ranging from single cells to large geological formations.
Although each project is incredibly time consuming, Brown states that the amount of time spent on each sculpture is part of its meaning. Certainly, thinking about how much labour goes in to each piece leaves you in awe. The artist states that he chose paper as his medium because “it captures perfectly that mixture of delicacy and durability that for me characterizes the natural world” (Rogan Brown).
-Janine Truong
Rogan Brown’s Paper Sculptures
Through his delicate paper sculptures, Rogan Brown expresses his fascination with the intricacy of the natural world. Drawing inspiration from scientific illustrations, Brown’s hand-cut pieces do not represent a single organism, but reflect themes found in nature. The patterns that Brown searches for exist in different scales, ranging from single cells to large geological formations.
Although each project is incredibly time consuming, Brown states that the amount of time spent on each sculpture is part of its meaning. Certainly, thinking about how much labour goes in to each piece leaves you in awe. The artist states that he chose paper as his medium because “it captures perfectly that mixture of delicacy and durability that for me characterizes the natural world” (Rogan Brown).
-Janine Truong
Rogan Brown’s Paper Sculptures
Through his delicate paper sculptures, Rogan Brown expresses his fascination with the intricacy of the natural world. Drawing inspiration from scientific illustrations, Brown’s hand-cut pieces do not represent a single organism, but reflect themes found in nature. The patterns that Brown searches for exist in different scales, ranging from single cells to large geological formations.
Although each project is incredibly time consuming, Brown states that the amount of time spent on each sculpture is part of its meaning. Certainly, thinking about how much labour goes in to each piece leaves you in awe. The artist states that he chose paper as his medium because “it captures perfectly that mixture of delicacy and durability that for me characterizes the natural world” (Rogan Brown).
-Janine Truong
Rogan Brown’s Paper Sculptures
Through his delicate paper sculptures, Rogan Brown expresses his fascination with the intricacy of the natural world. Drawing inspiration from scientific illustrations, Brown’s hand-cut pieces do not represent a single organism, but reflect themes found in nature. The patterns that Brown searches for exist in different scales, ranging from single cells to large geological formations.
Although each project is incredibly time consuming, Brown states that the amount of time spent on each sculpture is part of its meaning. Certainly, thinking about how much labour goes in to each piece leaves you in awe. The artist states that he chose paper as his medium because “it captures perfectly that mixture of delicacy and durability that for me characterizes the natural world” (Rogan Brown).
-Janine Truong
3-D Printing Reality

In the film Bladerunner, Replicants are androids - biorobotic, synthetic humans that try to pose as real people to avoid being terminated. They can pose as humans, despite being genetically engineered robots, because the differences between humans and androids in Bladerunner’s timeline is almost indistinguishable. What I am trying to point out is that in that universe, humans and technology have co-mingled in an intricate and intimate enough way to make them almost unrecognizable from the other. In a project that has the same title as the androids, Replicants, artist Lorna Barnshaw has tried to demonstrate the level of human interaction with technology and software by replicating real human portraits into a digital computer application, and bringing them back into physical reality via 3D-printing.

Using three different computer platforms and interfering as little as possible with said programs, Barnshaw has created a series of mask-like sculptures that both imitate and abstract the human form. One of the programs was set to turn a photograph into a 3-D model, resulting in a highly rendered, yet somewhat pixellated portrait mask. Another program has turned the face into a geometric, melting set of forms, turning the human face into a set of abstract, three dimensional data. The aim of the project was see what would happen if humanity was put through a digital filter while ‘replicating’ reality as closely as possible, manipulating each 3-D printing program as little as possible. While Bladerunner resides in the realm of science-fiction, the relationship between humanity and technology it portrays is echoed and applied in Replicants, a work made possible by real science and technology that is becoming more present and assimilated into mundane life. 
 
To view the project web page, click here.

-Lea Hamilton
3-D Printing Reality

In the film Bladerunner, Replicants are androids - biorobotic, synthetic humans that try to pose as real people to avoid being terminated. They can pose as humans, despite being genetically engineered robots, because the differences between humans and androids in Bladerunner’s timeline is almost indistinguishable. What I am trying to point out is that in that universe, humans and technology have co-mingled in an intricate and intimate enough way to make them almost unrecognizable from the other. In a project that has the same title as the androids, Replicants, artist Lorna Barnshaw has tried to demonstrate the level of human interaction with technology and software by replicating real human portraits into a digital computer application, and bringing them back into physical reality via 3D-printing.

Using three different computer platforms and interfering as little as possible with said programs, Barnshaw has created a series of mask-like sculptures that both imitate and abstract the human form. One of the programs was set to turn a photograph into a 3-D model, resulting in a highly rendered, yet somewhat pixellated portrait mask. Another program has turned the face into a geometric, melting set of forms, turning the human face into a set of abstract, three dimensional data. The aim of the project was see what would happen if humanity was put through a digital filter while ‘replicating’ reality as closely as possible, manipulating each 3-D printing program as little as possible. While Bladerunner resides in the realm of science-fiction, the relationship between humanity and technology it portrays is echoed and applied in Replicants, a work made possible by real science and technology that is becoming more present and assimilated into mundane life. 
 
To view the project web page, click here.

-Lea Hamilton
3-D Printing Reality

In the film Bladerunner, Replicants are androids - biorobotic, synthetic humans that try to pose as real people to avoid being terminated. They can pose as humans, despite being genetically engineered robots, because the differences between humans and androids in Bladerunner’s timeline is almost indistinguishable. What I am trying to point out is that in that universe, humans and technology have co-mingled in an intricate and intimate enough way to make them almost unrecognizable from the other. In a project that has the same title as the androids, Replicants, artist Lorna Barnshaw has tried to demonstrate the level of human interaction with technology and software by replicating real human portraits into a digital computer application, and bringing them back into physical reality via 3D-printing.

Using three different computer platforms and interfering as little as possible with said programs, Barnshaw has created a series of mask-like sculptures that both imitate and abstract the human form. One of the programs was set to turn a photograph into a 3-D model, resulting in a highly rendered, yet somewhat pixellated portrait mask. Another program has turned the face into a geometric, melting set of forms, turning the human face into a set of abstract, three dimensional data. The aim of the project was see what would happen if humanity was put through a digital filter while ‘replicating’ reality as closely as possible, manipulating each 3-D printing program as little as possible. While Bladerunner resides in the realm of science-fiction, the relationship between humanity and technology it portrays is echoed and applied in Replicants, a work made possible by real science and technology that is becoming more present and assimilated into mundane life. 
 
To view the project web page, click here.

-Lea Hamilton
3-D Printing Reality

In the film Bladerunner, Replicants are androids - biorobotic, synthetic humans that try to pose as real people to avoid being terminated. They can pose as humans, despite being genetically engineered robots, because the differences between humans and androids in Bladerunner’s timeline is almost indistinguishable. What I am trying to point out is that in that universe, humans and technology have co-mingled in an intricate and intimate enough way to make them almost unrecognizable from the other. In a project that has the same title as the androids, Replicants, artist Lorna Barnshaw has tried to demonstrate the level of human interaction with technology and software by replicating real human portraits into a digital computer application, and bringing them back into physical reality via 3D-printing.

Using three different computer platforms and interfering as little as possible with said programs, Barnshaw has created a series of mask-like sculptures that both imitate and abstract the human form. One of the programs was set to turn a photograph into a 3-D model, resulting in a highly rendered, yet somewhat pixellated portrait mask. Another program has turned the face into a geometric, melting set of forms, turning the human face into a set of abstract, three dimensional data. The aim of the project was see what would happen if humanity was put through a digital filter while ‘replicating’ reality as closely as possible, manipulating each 3-D printing program as little as possible. While Bladerunner resides in the realm of science-fiction, the relationship between humanity and technology it portrays is echoed and applied in Replicants, a work made possible by real science and technology that is becoming more present and assimilated into mundane life. 
 
To view the project web page, click here.

-Lea Hamilton

3-D Printing Reality


In the film Bladerunner, Replicants are androids - biorobotic, synthetic humans that try to pose as real people to avoid being terminated. They can pose as humans, despite being genetically engineered robots, because the differences between humans and androids in Bladerunner’s timeline is almost indistinguishable. What I am trying to point out is that in that universe, humans and technology have co-mingled in an intricate and intimate enough way to make them almost unrecognizable from the other. In a project that has the same title as the androids, Replicants, artist Lorna Barnshaw has tried to demonstrate the level of human interaction with technology and software by replicating real human portraits into a digital computer application, and bringing them back into physical reality via 3D-printing.

Using three different computer platforms and interfering as little as possible with said programs, Barnshaw has created a series of mask-like sculptures that both imitate and abstract the human form. One of the programs was set to turn a photograph into a 3-D model, resulting in a highly rendered, yet somewhat pixellated portrait mask. Another program has turned the face into a geometric, melting set of forms, turning the human face into a set of abstract, three dimensional data. The aim of the project was see what would happen if humanity was put through a digital filter while ‘replicating’ reality as closely as possible, manipulating each 3-D printing program as little as possible. While Bladerunner resides in the realm of science-fiction, the relationship between humanity and technology it portrays is echoed and applied in Replicants, a work made possible by real science and technology that is becoming more present and assimilated into mundane life. 

 

To view the project web page, click here.

-Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art technology 3-D printing Bladerunner Replicants Lorna Barnshaw Lea Hamilton sci-fi science-fiction reality androids portrait abstract sculpture
Livia Marin’s Broken Things
Usually when we break a plate or mug, we don’t think twice about throwing it away, and if we do try to repair it, the result is closer to a Frankenstein’s monster-esque piece of dinnerware than something used to eat off of. Yet contemporary Chilean artist Livia Marin focuses on this look of fragmentation and brokenness to create her series of work Broken Things (2009). 
What’s fun about Livia’s work is that she purposely creates fragmented sculptures of mugs or gravy boats, and silk screens intricate designs; the same designs, such as the Willow Pattern, that were mass-produced in the UK, and copied from Chinese decorative styles. This way, Marin is creating a piece that comments on and appropriates the mass-production of objects, often highly decorative pieces, and makes them into her own, unique handcrafted pieces.Some pieces are like a mismatched puzzle, while others surrealistically melt away from their ‘bodies’. As a whole though, her project is both stunning on an aesthetic level, as well as making us think about the mass-production of goods.
-Anna Paluch
Livia Marin’s Broken Things
Usually when we break a plate or mug, we don’t think twice about throwing it away, and if we do try to repair it, the result is closer to a Frankenstein’s monster-esque piece of dinnerware than something used to eat off of. Yet contemporary Chilean artist Livia Marin focuses on this look of fragmentation and brokenness to create her series of work Broken Things (2009). 
What’s fun about Livia’s work is that she purposely creates fragmented sculptures of mugs or gravy boats, and silk screens intricate designs; the same designs, such as the Willow Pattern, that were mass-produced in the UK, and copied from Chinese decorative styles. This way, Marin is creating a piece that comments on and appropriates the mass-production of objects, often highly decorative pieces, and makes them into her own, unique handcrafted pieces.Some pieces are like a mismatched puzzle, while others surrealistically melt away from their ‘bodies’. As a whole though, her project is both stunning on an aesthetic level, as well as making us think about the mass-production of goods.
-Anna Paluch
Livia Marin’s Broken Things
Usually when we break a plate or mug, we don’t think twice about throwing it away, and if we do try to repair it, the result is closer to a Frankenstein’s monster-esque piece of dinnerware than something used to eat off of. Yet contemporary Chilean artist Livia Marin focuses on this look of fragmentation and brokenness to create her series of work Broken Things (2009). 
What’s fun about Livia’s work is that she purposely creates fragmented sculptures of mugs or gravy boats, and silk screens intricate designs; the same designs, such as the Willow Pattern, that were mass-produced in the UK, and copied from Chinese decorative styles. This way, Marin is creating a piece that comments on and appropriates the mass-production of objects, often highly decorative pieces, and makes them into her own, unique handcrafted pieces.Some pieces are like a mismatched puzzle, while others surrealistically melt away from their ‘bodies’. As a whole though, her project is both stunning on an aesthetic level, as well as making us think about the mass-production of goods.
-Anna Paluch

Livia Marin’s Broken Things

Usually when we break a plate or mug, we don’t think twice about throwing it away, and if we do try to repair it, the result is closer to a Frankenstein’s monster-esque piece of dinnerware than something used to eat off of. Yet contemporary Chilean artist Livia Marin focuses on this look of fragmentation and brokenness to create her series of work Broken Things (2009). 

What’s fun about Livia’s work is that she purposely creates fragmented sculptures of mugs or gravy boats, and silk screens intricate designs; the same designs, such as the Willow Pattern, that were mass-produced in the UK, and copied from Chinese decorative styles. This way, Marin is creating a piece that comments on and appropriates the mass-production of objects, often highly decorative pieces, and makes them into her own, unique handcrafted pieces.

Some pieces are like a mismatched puzzle, while others surrealistically melt away from their ‘bodies’. As a whole though, her project is both stunning on an aesthetic level, as well as making us think about the mass-production of goods.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ livia marin art science art and science journal anna paluch pottery silk screen digital print sculpture

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