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Another Look at Canadian Landscape
The most recent project of Berlin based artist Charles Stankievech presents us with a 35 mm film installation which reimagines Northern Canadian landscape and its relationship to military infrastructure and the architecture of remote outposts. The time-lapse footage is accompanied by a highly effective soundtrack scored by the artist himself. The footage for the project, The Soniferous Æther of The Land Beyond The Land Beyond, was shot by Stankievech while at the CFS ALERT Signals Intelligence Station - the northern-most settlement on earth that remains populated year round. The Station was built on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut in the 1950’s, and has a complex military history with the station having been used throughout the cold war as surveillance for Russian communications. Today it is a Canadian operation with about 200 inhabitants at any given time. The name of the project plays with a phrase describing the region in the Inuit language Inukitut, which translates to “The Land Beyond the Land of the People”. Filmed during the winter months, the station is shrouded in darkness, with inhabitants taking refuge from temperatures reaching -50 degrees celsius.
The result is an unsettling vision of the far North - the footage definitely relies on certain aesthetics that are linked to science fiction, and even our expectations of solitary outposts at the end of the world. Stankievech explains in conversation with WIRED that this outpost is a place where “the celestial meets the terrestial” with a landscape that easily relates to outer space. The haunting images in the film render this far-off destination as an extra-terrestrial or even post-human environment.
Here’s the artist’s website for more details. The above images are screen shots from the film - if you weren’t lucky enough to catch the project in person at Toronto’s Nuit Blanche (like me) - you can take a look at the trailer here.
-Katherine Lawson
Another Look at Canadian Landscape
The most recent project of Berlin based artist Charles Stankievech presents us with a 35 mm film installation which reimagines Northern Canadian landscape and its relationship to military infrastructure and the architecture of remote outposts. The time-lapse footage is accompanied by a highly effective soundtrack scored by the artist himself. The footage for the project, The Soniferous Æther of The Land Beyond The Land Beyond, was shot by Stankievech while at the CFS ALERT Signals Intelligence Station - the northern-most settlement on earth that remains populated year round. The Station was built on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut in the 1950’s, and has a complex military history with the station having been used throughout the cold war as surveillance for Russian communications. Today it is a Canadian operation with about 200 inhabitants at any given time. The name of the project plays with a phrase describing the region in the Inuit language Inukitut, which translates to “The Land Beyond the Land of the People”. Filmed during the winter months, the station is shrouded in darkness, with inhabitants taking refuge from temperatures reaching -50 degrees celsius.
The result is an unsettling vision of the far North - the footage definitely relies on certain aesthetics that are linked to science fiction, and even our expectations of solitary outposts at the end of the world. Stankievech explains in conversation with WIRED that this outpost is a place where “the celestial meets the terrestial” with a landscape that easily relates to outer space. The haunting images in the film render this far-off destination as an extra-terrestrial or even post-human environment.
Here’s the artist’s website for more details. The above images are screen shots from the film - if you weren’t lucky enough to catch the project in person at Toronto’s Nuit Blanche (like me) - you can take a look at the trailer here.
-Katherine Lawson

Another Look at Canadian Landscape

The most recent project of Berlin based artist Charles Stankievech presents us with a 35 mm film installation which reimagines Northern Canadian landscape and its relationship to military infrastructure and the architecture of remote outposts. The time-lapse footage is accompanied by a highly effective soundtrack scored by the artist himself. The footage for the project, The Soniferous Æther of The Land Beyond The Land Beyond, was shot by Stankievech while at the CFS ALERT Signals Intelligence Station - the northern-most settlement on earth that remains populated year round. The Station was built on Ellesmere Island, Nunavut in the 1950’s, and has a complex military history with the station having been used throughout the cold war as surveillance for Russian communications. Today it is a Canadian operation with about 200 inhabitants at any given time. The name of the project plays with a phrase describing the region in the Inuit language Inukitut, which translates to “The Land Beyond the Land of the People”. Filmed during the winter months, the station is shrouded in darkness, with inhabitants taking refuge from temperatures reaching -50 degrees celsius.

The result is an unsettling vision of the far North - the footage definitely relies on certain aesthetics that are linked to science fiction, and even our expectations of solitary outposts at the end of the world. Stankievech explains in conversation with WIRED that this outpost is a place where “the celestial meets the terrestial” with a landscape that easily relates to outer space. The haunting images in the film render this far-off destination as an extra-terrestrial or even post-human environment.

Here’s the artist’s website for more details. The above images are screen shots from the film - if you weren’t lucky enough to catch the project in person at Toronto’s Nuit Blanche (like me) - you can take a look at the trailer here.

-Katherine Lawson

2 Photos
/ charles stankievech art landscape sci fi military canadian film katherine lawson space
Trevor Paglen’s Nonfunctional Satellite 
Opening September 12th in Istanbul, Turkey, Protocinema features an installation by artist/astronomer/author Trevor Paglen (previously featured on A&SJ HERE). Perhaps best known for his photographic investigation of the covert operations conducted by government agencies such as the CIA and their covert satellites and offensive military drone program; this new work sees Paglen taking aerospace technologies typically associated with militarism and challenges their ability to exist in a manner at odds with their conventional function, with an emphasis on aesthetics and design.
Prototype for a Nonfunctional Satellite (Design 4; Build 3) 2013, is a sculpture designed to be placed into low-earth orbit and reflect sunlight down to the earth’s surface. Once launched, it would appear as a bright point of light slowly moving across the sky over the course of several months, before burning up in the atmosphere. This spacecraft-cum-art object combines maximum reflectivity with minimum weight, taking the shape of a giant mirror-like sphere.
Paglen ponders what the aerospace engineering industry would look like if its methods were decoupled from the corporate and military interests that currently fund all space endeavors. His nonfunctional satellite recasts the age old question of “art for art’s sake” within a different field and with a different spin, asking whether we can imagine a place for “aerospace engineering for aerospace engineering’s sake.” In doing so, the spacecraft functions as both a critique of the militarization and commercialization of the night sky, and a way to imagine how things could be different.
Founded in 2011, Protocinema is a nonprofit art organization that makes transnational, nomadic exhibitions in Istanbul and New York. Protocinema creates opportunities for emerging and established artists from all regions to realize new work and exhibit existing work in a variety of contexts that are open to the public, and accessible to a wide range of individuals.
- Rob Echlin

Trevor Paglen’s Nonfunctional Satellite

Opening September 12th in Istanbul, Turkey, Protocinema features an installation by artist/astronomer/author Trevor Paglen (previously featured on A&SJ HERE). Perhaps best known for his photographic investigation of the covert operations conducted by government agencies such as the CIA and their covert satellites and offensive military drone program; this new work sees Paglen taking aerospace technologies typically associated with militarism and challenges their ability to exist in a manner at odds with their conventional function, with an emphasis on aesthetics and design.

Prototype for a Nonfunctional Satellite (Design 4; Build 3) 2013, is a sculpture designed to be placed into low-earth orbit and reflect sunlight down to the earth’s surface. Once launched, it would appear as a bright point of light slowly moving across the sky over the course of several months, before burning up in the atmosphere. This spacecraft-cum-art object combines maximum reflectivity with minimum weight, taking the shape of a giant mirror-like sphere.

Paglen ponders what the aerospace engineering industry would look like if its methods were decoupled from the corporate and military interests that currently fund all space endeavors. His nonfunctional satellite recasts the age old question of “art for art’s sake” within a different field and with a different spin, asking whether we can imagine a place for “aerospace engineering for aerospace engineering’s sake.” In doing so, the spacecraft functions as both a critique of the militarization and commercialization of the night sky, and a way to imagine how things could be different.

Founded in 2011, Protocinema is a nonprofit art organization that makes transnational, nomadic exhibitions in Istanbul and New York. Protocinema creates opportunities for emerging and established artists from all regions to realize new work and exhibit existing work in a variety of contexts that are open to the public, and accessible to a wide range of individuals.

- Rob Echlin

Trevor Paglen installation art art and science journal Sciene Space Aerospace
Landscape Revisited
The ability for people to go into space has opened many doors in terms of exploration and knowledge of the universe, yet it has also given us a chance to look at our Earth from a different perspective.
Col. Chris Hadfield is a Canadian astronaut, currently onboard the International Space Station, who takes pictures of the Earth while on his mission in space. It is a new style of landscape photography. Previously, our only options in terms of ‘landscape’ photography were to take a picture of the Earth, on Earth, or capture the vast expanse of space via astrophotography.
Now, we can take into account the scale of the Earth; how massive desserts are, how tiny cities are. We can see both natural beauty and industrial devastation. His images are reflections of the various societies in this world, and its history. Like all great photographs, they tell stories, either about lost civilizations, daily routines or environmental changes. 
Though not everyone can just get into a spaceship and take pictures all day, what Col. Chris Hadfield is doing, is opening doors for future artists, scientists, and explorers, to see the different ways in which we can capture our surroundings, through photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Revisited
The ability for people to go into space has opened many doors in terms of exploration and knowledge of the universe, yet it has also given us a chance to look at our Earth from a different perspective.
Col. Chris Hadfield is a Canadian astronaut, currently onboard the International Space Station, who takes pictures of the Earth while on his mission in space. It is a new style of landscape photography. Previously, our only options in terms of ‘landscape’ photography were to take a picture of the Earth, on Earth, or capture the vast expanse of space via astrophotography.
Now, we can take into account the scale of the Earth; how massive desserts are, how tiny cities are. We can see both natural beauty and industrial devastation. His images are reflections of the various societies in this world, and its history. Like all great photographs, they tell stories, either about lost civilizations, daily routines or environmental changes. 
Though not everyone can just get into a spaceship and take pictures all day, what Col. Chris Hadfield is doing, is opening doors for future artists, scientists, and explorers, to see the different ways in which we can capture our surroundings, through photography.
-Anna Paluch
Landscape Revisited
The ability for people to go into space has opened many doors in terms of exploration and knowledge of the universe, yet it has also given us a chance to look at our Earth from a different perspective.
Col. Chris Hadfield is a Canadian astronaut, currently onboard the International Space Station, who takes pictures of the Earth while on his mission in space. It is a new style of landscape photography. Previously, our only options in terms of ‘landscape’ photography were to take a picture of the Earth, on Earth, or capture the vast expanse of space via astrophotography.
Now, we can take into account the scale of the Earth; how massive desserts are, how tiny cities are. We can see both natural beauty and industrial devastation. His images are reflections of the various societies in this world, and its history. Like all great photographs, they tell stories, either about lost civilizations, daily routines or environmental changes. 
Though not everyone can just get into a spaceship and take pictures all day, what Col. Chris Hadfield is doing, is opening doors for future artists, scientists, and explorers, to see the different ways in which we can capture our surroundings, through photography.
-Anna Paluch

Landscape Revisited

The ability for people to go into space has opened many doors in terms of exploration and knowledge of the universe, yet it has also given us a chance to look at our Earth from a different perspective.

Col. Chris Hadfield is a Canadian astronaut, currently onboard the International Space Station, who takes pictures of the Earth while on his mission in space. It is a new style of landscape photography. Previously, our only options in terms of ‘landscape’ photography were to take a picture of the Earth, on Earth, or capture the vast expanse of space via astrophotography.

Now, we can take into account the scale of the Earth; how massive desserts are, how tiny cities are. We can see both natural beauty and industrial devastation. His images are reflections of the various societies in this world, and its history. Like all great photographs, they tell stories, either about lost civilizations, daily routines or environmental changes.

Though not everyone can just get into a spaceship and take pictures all day, what Col. Chris Hadfield is doing, is opening doors for future artists, scientists, and explorers, to see the different ways in which we can capture our surroundings, through photography.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ Col. Chris Hadfield astrophotography landscape photography art science art and science journal anna paluch nature space
Galactic Poetry
The downfall of living in an urban center, is that all we get to see during the night are blankets of cloud (possibly smog), and if we’re lucky, a few stars. What artist Sanjeev Sivarulrasa is trying to show in his work, Night Light, is what we are missing out on; a magical world, swimming through space, with galaxies and nebulae bejeweling the cosmos.
It is visual poetry.
The artist uses astrophotography to capture the various forms and colours of the stars and planets outside of an observatory setting. According to journalist Becky Rynor, it is as if he is capturing the great masterpieces that our ancestors would see; a natural art. Space does not have to be sacred scientific ground; it can also be merely another aesthetic aspect of our lives, that inspires people to think about the greater world around us. The simple observer plays as big of a role, as the great scientist. When this right to observe is taken away from us, via artificial city lights, we have to make the effort to go to the sources such as countryside’s, forests, lakes, and mountains. We must go to the nature, to connect back to ancient ideas of aesthetic beauty, and renew the senses. Sanjeev’s astrophotographs are to be seen as meditative, bringing awareness to our daily surroundings, and that sometimes, we need to take a step back, and see the bigger picture.
Night Light is currently exhibited at Karsh-Masson Gallery, until the 5th of May, 2013, and there will be an artist talk on the 24th of March, 2013-Anna Paluch
Galactic Poetry
The downfall of living in an urban center, is that all we get to see during the night are blankets of cloud (possibly smog), and if we’re lucky, a few stars. What artist Sanjeev Sivarulrasa is trying to show in his work, Night Light, is what we are missing out on; a magical world, swimming through space, with galaxies and nebulae bejeweling the cosmos.
It is visual poetry.
The artist uses astrophotography to capture the various forms and colours of the stars and planets outside of an observatory setting. According to journalist Becky Rynor, it is as if he is capturing the great masterpieces that our ancestors would see; a natural art. Space does not have to be sacred scientific ground; it can also be merely another aesthetic aspect of our lives, that inspires people to think about the greater world around us. The simple observer plays as big of a role, as the great scientist. When this right to observe is taken away from us, via artificial city lights, we have to make the effort to go to the sources such as countryside’s, forests, lakes, and mountains. We must go to the nature, to connect back to ancient ideas of aesthetic beauty, and renew the senses. Sanjeev’s astrophotographs are to be seen as meditative, bringing awareness to our daily surroundings, and that sometimes, we need to take a step back, and see the bigger picture.
Night Light is currently exhibited at Karsh-Masson Gallery, until the 5th of May, 2013, and there will be an artist talk on the 24th of March, 2013-Anna Paluch
Galactic Poetry
The downfall of living in an urban center, is that all we get to see during the night are blankets of cloud (possibly smog), and if we’re lucky, a few stars. What artist Sanjeev Sivarulrasa is trying to show in his work, Night Light, is what we are missing out on; a magical world, swimming through space, with galaxies and nebulae bejeweling the cosmos.
It is visual poetry.
The artist uses astrophotography to capture the various forms and colours of the stars and planets outside of an observatory setting. According to journalist Becky Rynor, it is as if he is capturing the great masterpieces that our ancestors would see; a natural art. Space does not have to be sacred scientific ground; it can also be merely another aesthetic aspect of our lives, that inspires people to think about the greater world around us. The simple observer plays as big of a role, as the great scientist. When this right to observe is taken away from us, via artificial city lights, we have to make the effort to go to the sources such as countryside’s, forests, lakes, and mountains. We must go to the nature, to connect back to ancient ideas of aesthetic beauty, and renew the senses. Sanjeev’s astrophotographs are to be seen as meditative, bringing awareness to our daily surroundings, and that sometimes, we need to take a step back, and see the bigger picture.
Night Light is currently exhibited at Karsh-Masson Gallery, until the 5th of May, 2013, and there will be an artist talk on the 24th of March, 2013-Anna Paluch

Galactic Poetry


The downfall of living in an
urban center, is that all we get to see during the night are blankets of cloud (possibly smog), and if we’re lucky, a few stars. What artist Sanjeev Sivarulrasa is trying to show in his work, Night Light, is what we are missing out on; a magical world, swimming through space, with galaxies and nebulae bejeweling the cosmos.

It is visual poetry.

The artist uses astrophotography to capture the various forms and colours of the stars and planets outside of an observatory setting. According to journalist Becky Rynor, it is as if he is capturing the great masterpieces that our ancestors would see; a natural art. Space does not have to be sacred scientific ground; it can also be merely another aesthetic aspect of our lives, that inspires people to think about the greater world around us. The simple observer plays as big of a role, as the great scientist. When this right to observe is taken away from us, via artificial city lights, we have to make the effort to go to the sources such as countryside’s, forests, lakes, and mountains. We must go to the nature, to connect back to ancient ideas of aesthetic beauty, and renew the senses. Sanjeev’s astrophotographs are to be seen as meditative, bringing awareness to our daily surroundings, and that sometimes, we need to take a step back, and see the bigger picture.

Night Light is currently exhibited at Karsh-Masson Gallery, until the 5th of May, 2013, and there will be an artist talk on the 24th of March, 2013

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ Sanjeev Sivarulrasa Astronomy astrophotography galaxy space anna paluch art science art and science journal karsh-masson gallery
Phoenix from the Ashes 
In German artist Thilo Frank’s The Phoenix is Closer than it Appears, the audience enters into the interior of the constructed room to experience a multi-dimensional view of themselves reflected back an infinite amount of times in the mirrored walls, floor, and ceiling.
What I find particularly interesting is the juxtaposition of the outside packaging of the space and the interior effect. On the outside, the audience is greeted with a single flat two dimensional reflection of their three dimensional reality in the gallery space by the mirrored exterior, but upon entering the mirrored interior, they are faced with an infinite and multi-dimensional reflection of themselves in the space. One can see themselves at all angles stretching into the seemingly infinite space creating a hypnotic experience. The room both tricks one’s eye and spacial senses into feeling like they are in an alternate and infinite reality.
As if the artist is addressing this feeling head on, the installed swing invites the viewer to swing and test the space’s possibilities. Rather than standing static in the room, the swing offers the audience a vehicle to move within the space and to view themselves in motion thus testing both the limits and possibilities of the mirrored room and its effect on the audience’s reflection. 
Finally, there has been reference to a sort of Matrix-like atmosphere in the space given the green hue and the multi-dimensional reflections making reference to a muti-dimensional reality. However, my immediate impression was that the room gave the feeling of floating in space—the ultimate infinite. With nothing solid below or above the audience, besides the mirrors reflecting back their image, to indicate that they are still in a gallery setting, the space disrupts the audiences secure feeling of having ground below their feet firmly planting them to the earth or a protective roof above their heads. 
Just like a Phoenix has an infinite amount of lives as it births itself from its ashes, the audience can experience an infinite version of themselves in Thilo Frank’s intriguing and hypnotic space.
For more on Thilo Frank, visit his artist’s website here.
For a youtube video of an audience member’s experience of The Phoenix is Closer than it Appears, click here.
-Katlin Rogers
Phoenix from the Ashes 
In German artist Thilo Frank’s The Phoenix is Closer than it Appears, the audience enters into the interior of the constructed room to experience a multi-dimensional view of themselves reflected back an infinite amount of times in the mirrored walls, floor, and ceiling.
What I find particularly interesting is the juxtaposition of the outside packaging of the space and the interior effect. On the outside, the audience is greeted with a single flat two dimensional reflection of their three dimensional reality in the gallery space by the mirrored exterior, but upon entering the mirrored interior, they are faced with an infinite and multi-dimensional reflection of themselves in the space. One can see themselves at all angles stretching into the seemingly infinite space creating a hypnotic experience. The room both tricks one’s eye and spacial senses into feeling like they are in an alternate and infinite reality.
As if the artist is addressing this feeling head on, the installed swing invites the viewer to swing and test the space’s possibilities. Rather than standing static in the room, the swing offers the audience a vehicle to move within the space and to view themselves in motion thus testing both the limits and possibilities of the mirrored room and its effect on the audience’s reflection. 
Finally, there has been reference to a sort of Matrix-like atmosphere in the space given the green hue and the multi-dimensional reflections making reference to a muti-dimensional reality. However, my immediate impression was that the room gave the feeling of floating in space—the ultimate infinite. With nothing solid below or above the audience, besides the mirrors reflecting back their image, to indicate that they are still in a gallery setting, the space disrupts the audiences secure feeling of having ground below their feet firmly planting them to the earth or a protective roof above their heads. 
Just like a Phoenix has an infinite amount of lives as it births itself from its ashes, the audience can experience an infinite version of themselves in Thilo Frank’s intriguing and hypnotic space.
For more on Thilo Frank, visit his artist’s website here.
For a youtube video of an audience member’s experience of The Phoenix is Closer than it Appears, click here.
-Katlin Rogers

Phoenix from the Ashes

In German artist Thilo Frank’s The Phoenix is Closer than it Appears, the audience enters into the interior of the constructed room to experience a multi-dimensional view of themselves reflected back an infinite amount of times in the mirrored walls, floor, and ceiling.

What I find particularly interesting is the juxtaposition of the outside packaging of the space and the interior effect. On the outside, the audience is greeted with a single flat two dimensional reflection of their three dimensional reality in the gallery space by the mirrored exterior, but upon entering the mirrored interior, they are faced with an infinite and multi-dimensional reflection of themselves in the space. One can see themselves at all angles stretching into the seemingly infinite space creating a hypnotic experience. The room both tricks one’s eye and spacial senses into feeling like they are in an alternate and infinite reality.

As if the artist is addressing this feeling head on, the installed swing invites the viewer to swing and test the space’s possibilities. Rather than standing static in the room, the swing offers the audience a vehicle to move within the space and to view themselves in motion thus testing both the limits and possibilities of the mirrored room and its effect on the audience’s reflection. 

Finally, there has been reference to a sort of Matrix-like atmosphere in the space given the green hue and the multi-dimensional reflections making reference to a muti-dimensional reality. However, my immediate impression was that the room gave the feeling of floating in space—the ultimate infinite. With nothing solid below or above the audience, besides the mirrors reflecting back their image, to indicate that they are still in a gallery setting, the space disrupts the audiences secure feeling of having ground below their feet firmly planting them to the earth or a protective roof above their heads. 

Just like a Phoenix has an infinite amount of lives as it births itself from its ashes, the audience can experience an infinite version of themselves in Thilo Frank’s intriguing and hypnotic space.

For more on Thilo Frank, visit his artist’s website here.

For a youtube video of an audience member’s experience of The Phoenix is Closer than it Appears, click here.

-Katlin Rogers

2 Photos
/ Art Science Space Mirrors Thilo Frank Matrix

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