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Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch
Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch
Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch
Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch

Recycling New Technologies

When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.

But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?

Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.

Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ Leonard Ulian Finnabair Anna Dabrowska computer art recycle art technology art science mandala book binding steampunk upcycling art and science journal
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ aki inomata anna paluch hermit crabs animals shells plastic scanning technology 3D Printing art science art and science journal ct scan shelter home physiology architecture biology

As artist Leo Selvaggio attests to in his video above, privacy is becoming a precious commodity. With the ever-increasing prevalence of technology and mobile devices, it’s difficult to maintain a low profile. Many of our actions, both online and out and about, are being recorded and surveilled, either on a camera or by virtually tracking our positions via mobile devices. This has driven Selvaggio to create a work of art and a hacking device that allows for its wearer to walk about undetected by the cameras that surveil them - URME Surveillance. Pronounced “you-are-me”, this device is a 3-D printed rubber mask manufactured by ThatsMyFace.com. The level of rendering is realistic enough to fool the facial recognition software, so that every person wearing the mask is recognized as Leo Selvaggio, not themselves.

Selvaggio has been living and working in Chicago, stating in his video that it is the most surveilled city in America - with over 25,000 cameras rigged with military-grade facial recognition software, it’s easy to see why Selvaggio would want to create some sort of bypass for those who would rather not be monitored. Instead of hiding the public’s face, Selvaggio is giving them a new one, “protecting the public from surveillance and creating a safe space to explore our digital identities.”

Aside from the rubber mask, URME Surveillance has two other products available to users: a paper mask, best worn in large groups, and a video encryption software that places Selvaggio’s face over those that appear in the video. Selvaggio is aware of the less savory activities that these masks could be used for, but insists that URME Surveillance is an “organized artistic intervention”, driven by a desire to allow an individual the ability to “assert themselves in a public space”. As such, it is expected that these devices are used responsibly by those who choose to wear them. 

To learn more about URME Surveillance or support its Indiegogo campaign, click here.

- Lea Hamilton 

(source)

URME SurveillanceLeo Selvaggioarthackingmask3d printingtechnologysurveillanceartandsciencejournalLea Hamilton
Light Up the Skies
When two artists with different aesthetic backgrounds collaborate, they often create stunning pieces, and the collaboration between artist’s Aaron Koblin and Janet Echelman is no exception.
Janet Echelman, who has been featured already on Art & Science Journal, creates fishnet-like aerial sculptures that look as if they were floating entities in the sky. The nets’ shapes are manipulated to form anything from funnels to winged creatures. Aaron Koblin is an artist and designer who focuses on data and digital technologies, how this information relates to cultural trends and how people react to changing technologies.
These artists collaborated together on March 15, 2014 at TED 2014 to create “Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks” outside the Vancouver Convention Centre where the TED talks were being held. TED is integral to this installation, as the two artists met at TED 2011 after their talks. In order to make such an installation possible, Echelman needed the expertise of Autodesk, a 3D design engineering software that specializes in working with interesting design problems. The amazing feature about this outdoor installation is that passersby can choreograph the lights on the web with their smartphones, controlling the aesthetic nature of the piece through technology.
If you would like to see how a sculpture of this magnitude was imagined, and then installed, TED blog has a ‘making-of’ gallery.
The installation will be up in Vancouver until the 22nd of March, 2014.
-Anna Paluch
Light Up the Skies
When two artists with different aesthetic backgrounds collaborate, they often create stunning pieces, and the collaboration between artist’s Aaron Koblin and Janet Echelman is no exception.
Janet Echelman, who has been featured already on Art & Science Journal, creates fishnet-like aerial sculptures that look as if they were floating entities in the sky. The nets’ shapes are manipulated to form anything from funnels to winged creatures. Aaron Koblin is an artist and designer who focuses on data and digital technologies, how this information relates to cultural trends and how people react to changing technologies.
These artists collaborated together on March 15, 2014 at TED 2014 to create “Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks” outside the Vancouver Convention Centre where the TED talks were being held. TED is integral to this installation, as the two artists met at TED 2011 after their talks. In order to make such an installation possible, Echelman needed the expertise of Autodesk, a 3D design engineering software that specializes in working with interesting design problems. The amazing feature about this outdoor installation is that passersby can choreograph the lights on the web with their smartphones, controlling the aesthetic nature of the piece through technology.
If you would like to see how a sculpture of this magnitude was imagined, and then installed, TED blog has a ‘making-of’ gallery.
The installation will be up in Vancouver until the 22nd of March, 2014.
-Anna Paluch

Light Up the Skies

When two artists with different aesthetic backgrounds collaborate, they often create stunning pieces, and the collaboration between artist’s Aaron Koblin and Janet Echelman is no exception.

Janet Echelman, who has been featured already on Art & Science Journal, creates fishnet-like aerial sculptures that look as if they were floating entities in the sky. The nets’ shapes are manipulated to form anything from funnels to winged creatures. Aaron Koblin is an artist and designer who focuses on data and digital technologies, how this information relates to cultural trends and how people react to changing technologies.

These artists collaborated together on March 15, 2014 at TED 2014 to create “Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks” outside the Vancouver Convention Centre where the TED talks were being held. TED is integral to this installation, as the two artists met at TED 2011 after their talks. In order to make such an installation possible, Echelman needed the expertise of Autodesk, a 3D design engineering software that specializes in working with interesting design problems. The amazing feature about this outdoor installation is that passersby can choreograph the lights on the web with their smartphones, controlling the aesthetic nature of the piece through technology.

If you would like to see how a sculpture of this magnitude was imagined, and then installed, TED blog has a ‘making-of’ gallery.

The installation will be up in Vancouver until the 22nd of March, 2014.

-Anna Paluch

2 Photos
/ Janet Echelman Aarron Koblin TED Vancouver webs technology engineering anna paluch art science art and science journal autodesk
Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck
Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.
Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.
For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.
- Victoria Nolte
Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck
Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.
Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.
For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.
- Victoria Nolte

Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck

Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.

Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.

For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.

- Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ art technology urban fiction 2.0 petra gemeinboeck locative media participatory art installation victoria nolte
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones

Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?

The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.

With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.

Visit the MeMo website.

- Lee Jones

8 Photos
/ art design death jessica charlesworth MeMo technology

Hoverboards Just Became Real (or Not?) - HUVrTech

Came across this video online and just had to share. A company called HUVrTech has launched a hoverboard set to be released in December 2014. Whether it’s real or not, it’s definitely a brilliant marketing stunt. 

Here’s their story:

"What began as a summer project in 2010 at the MIT Physics Graduate Program has evolved into one of the most exciting independent products to be developed out of MIT since the high-powered lithium-ion batteries developed by Yet-Ming Chiang in 2001. Our team consists of materials science, electricity & magnetism experts who’ve solved an important part of one of science’s mysteries: the key to antigravity.

The HUVr Board team ultimately aims to improve the efficiency, speed and sustainability of mass transportation. Yet rather than spend several more years closed off from the world while investing in research and development, the team and our world-class investors have worked to change the economics R&D by marketing this exciting consumer product in order to fund ongoing R&D.”

Visit their website here

- Lee Jones

arthoverboardhuvrtechdesigntechnology
Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening
 
As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.
This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.
Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 
- Lee Jones
Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening
 
As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.
This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.
Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 
- Lee Jones
Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening
 
As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.
This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.
Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 
- Lee Jones
Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening
 
As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.
This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.
Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 
- Lee Jones
Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening
 
As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.
This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.
Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 
- Lee Jones
Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening
 
As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.
This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.
Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 
- Lee Jones

Michael Burk’s “Therefore I am” Imagines Future Possibilities for Prenatal Screening


As advanced as technology is and with the number of devices and machines available to us, a machine that produces an in-depth look into the life and future of an unborn child, has still yet to be actualized. Ultrasounds and sonograms give us a peek into the life and development of a child while in the womb, but Michael Burk, of the Berlin University of the Arts, has created a way to look deeper into the life and future of those yet to be born. Burk’s Therefore I Am displays his fictional measuring instrument, the purpose of which is to produce a story about one’s life and ultimately their death.

This deeper look into prenatal diagnostics is executed by Burk’s machine, when initiated by the user. A blood sample is inserted, the dial is turned, and animation on the machine’s screen displays images that mimic chromosomes, and strands of deoxyribonucleic acid molecules. Once the machine is finished, it produces and prints a life story based on the blood sample measurement. A typical life story includes the gender of the person, their interests, their sexual orientation, and their career choice. The instrument gives a life, future, and real feel to a person who has yet to even take their first breath.

Watch the video Therefore I Am on vimeo. 

- Lee Jones

6 Photos
/ art technology prenatal screening michael burk Therefore I am vimeo
Creating Empathy: New Project Out of MIT Allows Readers to Feel What They See
Many of us have dove into a book and had the experience of feeling what the character you’re reading is going through. The trademark of a good writer is being able to engulf the reader with so much detail and such an interesting storyline that they don’t want to put the book down. Sensory fiction has taken that experience to a brand new, digital, and technologically advanced level. MIT researchers Felix Heibeck, Alexis Hope, and Julie Legaul have successfully created and designed the first ‘sensory fiction’ book and body apparatus.
With their invention, the reader of a book can not only empathize mentally, but also physically feel and experience what the characters in the book are feeling. Sensory fiction accomplishes this with a series of LED lights that change colour according to the mood described, a compression system that allows the reader to feel tension, and a heating device that changes the temperature of the skin. With the ability to physically impose emotions and feelings on the readers, this MIT project opens an even wider creative door for authors, who were in the past limited to printed words. As the user and reader, cuddling up with a new book will now make the imaginary feel more like reality.
Watch the video Sensory Fiction on Vimeo.
- Lee Jones
Creating Empathy: New Project Out of MIT Allows Readers to Feel What They See
Many of us have dove into a book and had the experience of feeling what the character you’re reading is going through. The trademark of a good writer is being able to engulf the reader with so much detail and such an interesting storyline that they don’t want to put the book down. Sensory fiction has taken that experience to a brand new, digital, and technologically advanced level. MIT researchers Felix Heibeck, Alexis Hope, and Julie Legaul have successfully created and designed the first ‘sensory fiction’ book and body apparatus.
With their invention, the reader of a book can not only empathize mentally, but also physically feel and experience what the characters in the book are feeling. Sensory fiction accomplishes this with a series of LED lights that change colour according to the mood described, a compression system that allows the reader to feel tension, and a heating device that changes the temperature of the skin. With the ability to physically impose emotions and feelings on the readers, this MIT project opens an even wider creative door for authors, who were in the past limited to printed words. As the user and reader, cuddling up with a new book will now make the imaginary feel more like reality.
Watch the video Sensory Fiction on Vimeo.
- Lee Jones
Creating Empathy: New Project Out of MIT Allows Readers to Feel What They See
Many of us have dove into a book and had the experience of feeling what the character you’re reading is going through. The trademark of a good writer is being able to engulf the reader with so much detail and such an interesting storyline that they don’t want to put the book down. Sensory fiction has taken that experience to a brand new, digital, and technologically advanced level. MIT researchers Felix Heibeck, Alexis Hope, and Julie Legaul have successfully created and designed the first ‘sensory fiction’ book and body apparatus.
With their invention, the reader of a book can not only empathize mentally, but also physically feel and experience what the characters in the book are feeling. Sensory fiction accomplishes this with a series of LED lights that change colour according to the mood described, a compression system that allows the reader to feel tension, and a heating device that changes the temperature of the skin. With the ability to physically impose emotions and feelings on the readers, this MIT project opens an even wider creative door for authors, who were in the past limited to printed words. As the user and reader, cuddling up with a new book will now make the imaginary feel more like reality.
Watch the video Sensory Fiction on Vimeo.
- Lee Jones
Creating Empathy: New Project Out of MIT Allows Readers to Feel What They See
Many of us have dove into a book and had the experience of feeling what the character you’re reading is going through. The trademark of a good writer is being able to engulf the reader with so much detail and such an interesting storyline that they don’t want to put the book down. Sensory fiction has taken that experience to a brand new, digital, and technologically advanced level. MIT researchers Felix Heibeck, Alexis Hope, and Julie Legaul have successfully created and designed the first ‘sensory fiction’ book and body apparatus.
With their invention, the reader of a book can not only empathize mentally, but also physically feel and experience what the characters in the book are feeling. Sensory fiction accomplishes this with a series of LED lights that change colour according to the mood described, a compression system that allows the reader to feel tension, and a heating device that changes the temperature of the skin. With the ability to physically impose emotions and feelings on the readers, this MIT project opens an even wider creative door for authors, who were in the past limited to printed words. As the user and reader, cuddling up with a new book will now make the imaginary feel more like reality.
Watch the video Sensory Fiction on Vimeo.
- Lee Jones
Creating Empathy: New Project Out of MIT Allows Readers to Feel What They See
Many of us have dove into a book and had the experience of feeling what the character you’re reading is going through. The trademark of a good writer is being able to engulf the reader with so much detail and such an interesting storyline that they don’t want to put the book down. Sensory fiction has taken that experience to a brand new, digital, and technologically advanced level. MIT researchers Felix Heibeck, Alexis Hope, and Julie Legaul have successfully created and designed the first ‘sensory fiction’ book and body apparatus.
With their invention, the reader of a book can not only empathize mentally, but also physically feel and experience what the characters in the book are feeling. Sensory fiction accomplishes this with a series of LED lights that change colour according to the mood described, a compression system that allows the reader to feel tension, and a heating device that changes the temperature of the skin. With the ability to physically impose emotions and feelings on the readers, this MIT project opens an even wider creative door for authors, who were in the past limited to printed words. As the user and reader, cuddling up with a new book will now make the imaginary feel more like reality.
Watch the video Sensory Fiction on Vimeo.
- Lee Jones

Creating Empathy: New Project Out of MIT Allows Readers to Feel What They See

Many of us have dove into a book and had the experience of feeling what the character you’re reading is going through. The trademark of a good writer is being able to engulf the reader with so much detail and such an interesting storyline that they don’t want to put the book down. Sensory fiction has taken that experience to a brand new, digital, and technologically advanced level. MIT researchers Felix Heibeck, Alexis Hope, and Julie Legaul have successfully created and designed the first ‘sensory fiction’ book and body apparatus.

With their invention, the reader of a book can not only empathize mentally, but also physically feel and experience what the characters in the book are feeling. Sensory fiction accomplishes this with a series of LED lights that change colour according to the mood described, a compression system that allows the reader to feel tension, and a heating device that changes the temperature of the skin. With the ability to physically impose emotions and feelings on the readers, this MIT project opens an even wider creative door for authors, who were in the past limited to printed words. As the user and reader, cuddling up with a new book will now make the imaginary feel more like reality.

Watch the video Sensory Fiction on Vimeo.

- Lee Jones

5 Photos
/ art technology MIT Sensory Fiction felix heibeck alexis hope julie legaul
Donato Sansone’s Digital Nightmares
Some artists sketch, others draw, some paint, while others animate, and some, like Donato Sansone, do it all. Donato Sansone’s Portrait is a combination of portraiture and video that turns stills into motion. Along with sound by Enrico Ascoli, Sansone has recently completed his video installation entitled, Portrait, which gives movement and sound to his dream-like visual renderings. Sansone uses images of real people, and through video editing and manipulation, elevates the still art into a heightened, more life-like dimension. As a collective showcase, his portraits are vividly stunning.
Describing his pieces as both, ‘nightmarish’ and ‘grotesque’, Sansone transforms ordinary people into extraordinary art. His stills and video captivate and invite the viewer to thoroughly inspect every square inch of the portrait. Putting his pieces to motion, along with enlisting the help of Ascoli, for sound, Sansone has managed to give life to and eloquently display a beautifully disfigured nightmare in just less than three minutes. Each piece in the Portrait collection features a headshot of an individual, with its natural lines and feature placements artfully and skillfully manipulated. The onlooker can easily identify the subject but is left to stare and marvel at its transformation
Watch the video, Portrait, here. 
- Lee Jones
Donato Sansone’s Digital Nightmares
Some artists sketch, others draw, some paint, while others animate, and some, like Donato Sansone, do it all. Donato Sansone’s Portrait is a combination of portraiture and video that turns stills into motion. Along with sound by Enrico Ascoli, Sansone has recently completed his video installation entitled, Portrait, which gives movement and sound to his dream-like visual renderings. Sansone uses images of real people, and through video editing and manipulation, elevates the still art into a heightened, more life-like dimension. As a collective showcase, his portraits are vividly stunning.
Describing his pieces as both, ‘nightmarish’ and ‘grotesque’, Sansone transforms ordinary people into extraordinary art. His stills and video captivate and invite the viewer to thoroughly inspect every square inch of the portrait. Putting his pieces to motion, along with enlisting the help of Ascoli, for sound, Sansone has managed to give life to and eloquently display a beautifully disfigured nightmare in just less than three minutes. Each piece in the Portrait collection features a headshot of an individual, with its natural lines and feature placements artfully and skillfully manipulated. The onlooker can easily identify the subject but is left to stare and marvel at its transformation
Watch the video, Portrait, here. 
- Lee Jones
Donato Sansone’s Digital Nightmares
Some artists sketch, others draw, some paint, while others animate, and some, like Donato Sansone, do it all. Donato Sansone’s Portrait is a combination of portraiture and video that turns stills into motion. Along with sound by Enrico Ascoli, Sansone has recently completed his video installation entitled, Portrait, which gives movement and sound to his dream-like visual renderings. Sansone uses images of real people, and through video editing and manipulation, elevates the still art into a heightened, more life-like dimension. As a collective showcase, his portraits are vividly stunning.
Describing his pieces as both, ‘nightmarish’ and ‘grotesque’, Sansone transforms ordinary people into extraordinary art. His stills and video captivate and invite the viewer to thoroughly inspect every square inch of the portrait. Putting his pieces to motion, along with enlisting the help of Ascoli, for sound, Sansone has managed to give life to and eloquently display a beautifully disfigured nightmare in just less than three minutes. Each piece in the Portrait collection features a headshot of an individual, with its natural lines and feature placements artfully and skillfully manipulated. The onlooker can easily identify the subject but is left to stare and marvel at its transformation
Watch the video, Portrait, here. 
- Lee Jones
Donato Sansone’s Digital Nightmares
Some artists sketch, others draw, some paint, while others animate, and some, like Donato Sansone, do it all. Donato Sansone’s Portrait is a combination of portraiture and video that turns stills into motion. Along with sound by Enrico Ascoli, Sansone has recently completed his video installation entitled, Portrait, which gives movement and sound to his dream-like visual renderings. Sansone uses images of real people, and through video editing and manipulation, elevates the still art into a heightened, more life-like dimension. As a collective showcase, his portraits are vividly stunning.
Describing his pieces as both, ‘nightmarish’ and ‘grotesque’, Sansone transforms ordinary people into extraordinary art. His stills and video captivate and invite the viewer to thoroughly inspect every square inch of the portrait. Putting his pieces to motion, along with enlisting the help of Ascoli, for sound, Sansone has managed to give life to and eloquently display a beautifully disfigured nightmare in just less than three minutes. Each piece in the Portrait collection features a headshot of an individual, with its natural lines and feature placements artfully and skillfully manipulated. The onlooker can easily identify the subject but is left to stare and marvel at its transformation
Watch the video, Portrait, here. 
- Lee Jones
Donato Sansone’s Digital Nightmares
Some artists sketch, others draw, some paint, while others animate, and some, like Donato Sansone, do it all. Donato Sansone’s Portrait is a combination of portraiture and video that turns stills into motion. Along with sound by Enrico Ascoli, Sansone has recently completed his video installation entitled, Portrait, which gives movement and sound to his dream-like visual renderings. Sansone uses images of real people, and through video editing and manipulation, elevates the still art into a heightened, more life-like dimension. As a collective showcase, his portraits are vividly stunning.
Describing his pieces as both, ‘nightmarish’ and ‘grotesque’, Sansone transforms ordinary people into extraordinary art. His stills and video captivate and invite the viewer to thoroughly inspect every square inch of the portrait. Putting his pieces to motion, along with enlisting the help of Ascoli, for sound, Sansone has managed to give life to and eloquently display a beautifully disfigured nightmare in just less than three minutes. Each piece in the Portrait collection features a headshot of an individual, with its natural lines and feature placements artfully and skillfully manipulated. The onlooker can easily identify the subject but is left to stare and marvel at its transformation
Watch the video, Portrait, here. 
- Lee Jones
Donato Sansone’s Digital Nightmares
Some artists sketch, others draw, some paint, while others animate, and some, like Donato Sansone, do it all. Donato Sansone’s Portrait is a combination of portraiture and video that turns stills into motion. Along with sound by Enrico Ascoli, Sansone has recently completed his video installation entitled, Portrait, which gives movement and sound to his dream-like visual renderings. Sansone uses images of real people, and through video editing and manipulation, elevates the still art into a heightened, more life-like dimension. As a collective showcase, his portraits are vividly stunning.
Describing his pieces as both, ‘nightmarish’ and ‘grotesque’, Sansone transforms ordinary people into extraordinary art. His stills and video captivate and invite the viewer to thoroughly inspect every square inch of the portrait. Putting his pieces to motion, along with enlisting the help of Ascoli, for sound, Sansone has managed to give life to and eloquently display a beautifully disfigured nightmare in just less than three minutes. Each piece in the Portrait collection features a headshot of an individual, with its natural lines and feature placements artfully and skillfully manipulated. The onlooker can easily identify the subject but is left to stare and marvel at its transformation
Watch the video, Portrait, here. 
- Lee Jones

Donato Sansone’s Digital Nightmares

Some artists sketch, others draw, some paint, while others animate, and some, like Donato Sansone, do it all. Donato Sansone’s Portrait is a combination of portraiture and video that turns stills into motion. Along with sound by Enrico Ascoli, Sansone has recently completed his video installation entitled, Portrait, which gives movement and sound to his dream-like visual renderings. Sansone uses images of real people, and through video editing and manipulation, elevates the still art into a heightened, more life-like dimension. As a collective showcase, his portraits are vividly stunning.

Describing his pieces as both, ‘nightmarish’ and ‘grotesque’, Sansone transforms ordinary people into extraordinary art. His stills and video captivate and invite the viewer to thoroughly inspect every square inch of the portrait. Putting his pieces to motion, along with enlisting the help of Ascoli, for sound, Sansone has managed to give life to and eloquently display a beautifully disfigured nightmare in just less than three minutes. Each piece in the Portrait collection features a headshot of an individual, with its natural lines and feature placements artfully and skillfully manipulated. The onlooker can easily identify the subject but is left to stare and marvel at its transformation

Watch the video, Portrait, here. 

- Lee Jones

6 Photos
/ art technology donato sansone portrait vimeo

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