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Szymon Kaliski’s “Biomimesis: Hyphae”

Polish artist Szymon Kaliski’s video installation “Biomimesis: Hyphae” (2013) is an interactive motion censored video piece, heavily influenced by fungal growth and the relationship between biology and technology. 

The piece includes abstract lines and minimalist shapes as a representation of the fungus and it’s growths. This simulated fungal growth can be ‘maintained’ by standing in front of the screen. The viewer’s movements act as the food which helps the digital life-form stay alive; no movement means the digital life-form before you begins to decay, and even die. It is a piece that puts a heavy responsibility on the audience; they have the power to create or destroy life, symbolic of the impact we have on both technological advancements and natural devastation (and vice versa). 

The artist uses a modified space colonization algorithm from Cinder Library with a combination of a motion tracking program from OpenCV library to create this piece which combines “fungal growth with cold digital aesthetics”. Open source libraries are amazing wells of resources, and allows for artists of various backgrounds to learn new (and important) skills in our digital age.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

szymon kaliskibiomimesisbiologytechnologyanna paluchdigital artvideo artmotion censorfungal growthopen sourceinteractive artartscienceart and science journal
Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 2014
The Nuit Blanche festivals, which happen in various cities all over the world throughout the year, are amazing opportunities to see innovative artists and a chance to bring the art to the streets, rather than hiding it away in a gallery. The cities of Ottawa and Gatineau made sure that their Nuit Blanche (NBOG) was both interactive and eclectic, encouraging audiences to not only look at the works, but be a part of their process.
What is unique about NBOG 2014 is that a majority of the interactive works focused on technology and engineering as artistic mediums.
Artists Christine Kim and Marcin Kedzior collaborated to design “PAPER ORBS" which visitors had to take off an intricate structure in order to wear in various fashions, creating a fluidity of the form. Similarly, Ingrid Dabringer also emphasized fluidity of form in her work with “Invisible Landscapes”, altering the structure of the works’ environment with string and optical illusion.
On the technological side, two artists focused primarily on the use of social media; 6artists and Jennifer Stewart. The collective known as 6artists performed the making of a sculpture, but the only communication between themselves and the audience all night was through Twitter. Jennifer Stewart also encouraged NBOG guests to communicate with her, but only through Snapchat. Another fun, interactive project was Krasimira Dimtchevska's “Free Speech & Free Art" which gave NBOG audiences free USB sticks of digital works created by the artist, a ‘souvenir’ piece, just like PAPER ORBS.
Interactive projections also were featured heavily in this year’s festival, such as Cheryl Pagurek's “Bodies of Water” (which appeared in her “Navigate" piece for NBOG), Galerie Montcalm's “PASSAGE PIXELLISÉ II”, Bear Witness' “Sentinels" which guarded the entrance to the Ottawa Art Gallery, and Jesse Stewart's “Passage”, to create unforgettable audio-visual experiences for all those attending NBOG.
As with every festival, there can be so much more to say. The eclectic mix of both professional and emerging artists, traditional arts and new media arts, made this year’s Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau among one of the most innovative and interactive Nuit Blanche festivals yet.
-Anna Paluch
Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 2014
The Nuit Blanche festivals, which happen in various cities all over the world throughout the year, are amazing opportunities to see innovative artists and a chance to bring the art to the streets, rather than hiding it away in a gallery. The cities of Ottawa and Gatineau made sure that their Nuit Blanche (NBOG) was both interactive and eclectic, encouraging audiences to not only look at the works, but be a part of their process.
What is unique about NBOG 2014 is that a majority of the interactive works focused on technology and engineering as artistic mediums.
Artists Christine Kim and Marcin Kedzior collaborated to design “PAPER ORBS" which visitors had to take off an intricate structure in order to wear in various fashions, creating a fluidity of the form. Similarly, Ingrid Dabringer also emphasized fluidity of form in her work with “Invisible Landscapes”, altering the structure of the works’ environment with string and optical illusion.
On the technological side, two artists focused primarily on the use of social media; 6artists and Jennifer Stewart. The collective known as 6artists performed the making of a sculpture, but the only communication between themselves and the audience all night was through Twitter. Jennifer Stewart also encouraged NBOG guests to communicate with her, but only through Snapchat. Another fun, interactive project was Krasimira Dimtchevska's “Free Speech & Free Art" which gave NBOG audiences free USB sticks of digital works created by the artist, a ‘souvenir’ piece, just like PAPER ORBS.
Interactive projections also were featured heavily in this year’s festival, such as Cheryl Pagurek's “Bodies of Water” (which appeared in her “Navigate" piece for NBOG), Galerie Montcalm's “PASSAGE PIXELLISÉ II”, Bear Witness' “Sentinels" which guarded the entrance to the Ottawa Art Gallery, and Jesse Stewart's “Passage”, to create unforgettable audio-visual experiences for all those attending NBOG.
As with every festival, there can be so much more to say. The eclectic mix of both professional and emerging artists, traditional arts and new media arts, made this year’s Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau among one of the most innovative and interactive Nuit Blanche festivals yet.
-Anna Paluch
Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 2014
The Nuit Blanche festivals, which happen in various cities all over the world throughout the year, are amazing opportunities to see innovative artists and a chance to bring the art to the streets, rather than hiding it away in a gallery. The cities of Ottawa and Gatineau made sure that their Nuit Blanche (NBOG) was both interactive and eclectic, encouraging audiences to not only look at the works, but be a part of their process.
What is unique about NBOG 2014 is that a majority of the interactive works focused on technology and engineering as artistic mediums.
Artists Christine Kim and Marcin Kedzior collaborated to design “PAPER ORBS" which visitors had to take off an intricate structure in order to wear in various fashions, creating a fluidity of the form. Similarly, Ingrid Dabringer also emphasized fluidity of form in her work with “Invisible Landscapes”, altering the structure of the works’ environment with string and optical illusion.
On the technological side, two artists focused primarily on the use of social media; 6artists and Jennifer Stewart. The collective known as 6artists performed the making of a sculpture, but the only communication between themselves and the audience all night was through Twitter. Jennifer Stewart also encouraged NBOG guests to communicate with her, but only through Snapchat. Another fun, interactive project was Krasimira Dimtchevska's “Free Speech & Free Art" which gave NBOG audiences free USB sticks of digital works created by the artist, a ‘souvenir’ piece, just like PAPER ORBS.
Interactive projections also were featured heavily in this year’s festival, such as Cheryl Pagurek's “Bodies of Water” (which appeared in her “Navigate" piece for NBOG), Galerie Montcalm's “PASSAGE PIXELLISÉ II”, Bear Witness' “Sentinels" which guarded the entrance to the Ottawa Art Gallery, and Jesse Stewart's “Passage”, to create unforgettable audio-visual experiences for all those attending NBOG.
As with every festival, there can be so much more to say. The eclectic mix of both professional and emerging artists, traditional arts and new media arts, made this year’s Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau among one of the most innovative and interactive Nuit Blanche festivals yet.
-Anna Paluch
Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 2014
The Nuit Blanche festivals, which happen in various cities all over the world throughout the year, are amazing opportunities to see innovative artists and a chance to bring the art to the streets, rather than hiding it away in a gallery. The cities of Ottawa and Gatineau made sure that their Nuit Blanche (NBOG) was both interactive and eclectic, encouraging audiences to not only look at the works, but be a part of their process.
What is unique about NBOG 2014 is that a majority of the interactive works focused on technology and engineering as artistic mediums.
Artists Christine Kim and Marcin Kedzior collaborated to design “PAPER ORBS" which visitors had to take off an intricate structure in order to wear in various fashions, creating a fluidity of the form. Similarly, Ingrid Dabringer also emphasized fluidity of form in her work with “Invisible Landscapes”, altering the structure of the works’ environment with string and optical illusion.
On the technological side, two artists focused primarily on the use of social media; 6artists and Jennifer Stewart. The collective known as 6artists performed the making of a sculpture, but the only communication between themselves and the audience all night was through Twitter. Jennifer Stewart also encouraged NBOG guests to communicate with her, but only through Snapchat. Another fun, interactive project was Krasimira Dimtchevska's “Free Speech & Free Art" which gave NBOG audiences free USB sticks of digital works created by the artist, a ‘souvenir’ piece, just like PAPER ORBS.
Interactive projections also were featured heavily in this year’s festival, such as Cheryl Pagurek's “Bodies of Water” (which appeared in her “Navigate" piece for NBOG), Galerie Montcalm's “PASSAGE PIXELLISÉ II”, Bear Witness' “Sentinels" which guarded the entrance to the Ottawa Art Gallery, and Jesse Stewart's “Passage”, to create unforgettable audio-visual experiences for all those attending NBOG.
As with every festival, there can be so much more to say. The eclectic mix of both professional and emerging artists, traditional arts and new media arts, made this year’s Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau among one of the most innovative and interactive Nuit Blanche festivals yet.
-Anna Paluch
Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 2014
The Nuit Blanche festivals, which happen in various cities all over the world throughout the year, are amazing opportunities to see innovative artists and a chance to bring the art to the streets, rather than hiding it away in a gallery. The cities of Ottawa and Gatineau made sure that their Nuit Blanche (NBOG) was both interactive and eclectic, encouraging audiences to not only look at the works, but be a part of their process.
What is unique about NBOG 2014 is that a majority of the interactive works focused on technology and engineering as artistic mediums.
Artists Christine Kim and Marcin Kedzior collaborated to design “PAPER ORBS" which visitors had to take off an intricate structure in order to wear in various fashions, creating a fluidity of the form. Similarly, Ingrid Dabringer also emphasized fluidity of form in her work with “Invisible Landscapes”, altering the structure of the works’ environment with string and optical illusion.
On the technological side, two artists focused primarily on the use of social media; 6artists and Jennifer Stewart. The collective known as 6artists performed the making of a sculpture, but the only communication between themselves and the audience all night was through Twitter. Jennifer Stewart also encouraged NBOG guests to communicate with her, but only through Snapchat. Another fun, interactive project was Krasimira Dimtchevska's “Free Speech & Free Art" which gave NBOG audiences free USB sticks of digital works created by the artist, a ‘souvenir’ piece, just like PAPER ORBS.
Interactive projections also were featured heavily in this year’s festival, such as Cheryl Pagurek's “Bodies of Water” (which appeared in her “Navigate" piece for NBOG), Galerie Montcalm's “PASSAGE PIXELLISÉ II”, Bear Witness' “Sentinels" which guarded the entrance to the Ottawa Art Gallery, and Jesse Stewart's “Passage”, to create unforgettable audio-visual experiences for all those attending NBOG.
As with every festival, there can be so much more to say. The eclectic mix of both professional and emerging artists, traditional arts and new media arts, made this year’s Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau among one of the most innovative and interactive Nuit Blanche festivals yet.
-Anna Paluch

Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 2014

The Nuit Blanche festivals, which happen in various cities all over the world throughout the year, are amazing opportunities to see innovative artists and a chance to bring the art to the streets, rather than hiding it away in a gallery. The cities of Ottawa and Gatineau made sure that their Nuit Blanche (NBOG) was both interactive and eclectic, encouraging audiences to not only look at the works, but be a part of their process.

What is unique about NBOG 2014 is that a majority of the interactive works focused on technology and engineering as artistic mediums.

Artists Christine Kim and Marcin Kedzior collaborated to design “PAPER ORBS" which visitors had to take off an intricate structure in order to wear in various fashions, creating a fluidity of the form. Similarly, Ingrid Dabringer also emphasized fluidity of form in her work with “Invisible Landscapes”, altering the structure of the works’ environment with string and optical illusion.

On the technological side, two artists focused primarily on the use of social media; 6artists and Jennifer Stewart. The collective known as 6artists performed the making of a sculpture, but the only communication between themselves and the audience all night was through Twitter. Jennifer Stewart also encouraged NBOG guests to communicate with her, but only through Snapchat. Another fun, interactive project was Krasimira Dimtchevska's “Free Speech & Free Art" which gave NBOG audiences free USB sticks of digital works created by the artist, a ‘souvenir’ piece, just like PAPER ORBS.

Interactive projections also were featured heavily in this year’s festival, such as Cheryl Pagurek's “Bodies of Water” (which appeared in her “Navigate" piece for NBOG), Galerie Montcalm's “PASSAGE PIXELLISÉ II”, Bear Witness' “Sentinels" which guarded the entrance to the Ottawa Art Gallery, and Jesse Stewart's “Passage”, to create unforgettable audio-visual experiences for all those attending NBOG.

As with every festival, there can be so much more to say. The eclectic mix of both professional and emerging artists, traditional arts and new media arts, made this year’s Nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau among one of the most innovative and interactive Nuit Blanche festivals yet.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ anna paluch Christine Kim Marcin Kedzior nbog14 nuit Blanche Ottawa+Gatineau 6artists Jennifer Stewart Cheryl Pagurek Galerie Montcalm Bear Witness Jesse Stewart Krasimira Dimtchevska interactive art technology performance Projection social media engineering art science art and science journal local art ottawa art
SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch
SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch
SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch
SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design
Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.
It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.
Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.
Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.
-Anna Paluch

SpotLIGHT on Super Nature Design

Shanghai-based design company Super Nature Design has a unique approach to engaging audiences, by focusing on creating works that are interactive in design, communicate visually with those engaging with it, and most importantly, doing all of the above through the use of media technology.

It is not unheard of for design companies to create art, and Super Nature has a strong portfolio of interactive works, particularly those that use light and geometry to engage audiences, creating a dialogue between them, the space they are in, and the materiality and function of the work before them.

Some works, like “New Angles” (2010), include pyramid-like structures with lights that react to the movements of the viewer. Super Nature describes this work as one that reflects “the juxtaposition of subversive thinking and visual perception”, combining imagination, reality and technology. Further diving into the world of imagination is “Dreamscape” (2013) which utilizes the idea of a hypercube and the fourth dimension. Interacting with the work and its space allows audiences to experience different depths of field, as the lights travel through the many layers of the sculpture. This piece takes advantage of the architecture of the cube and characteristics of light, to create illusions that challenge our perceptions of visual dimensions.

Moving onto more literal homages to science, are works “PRISMA1666” (2011) and “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle” (2012). In “PRISMA1666”, Super Nature (collaborating with Wonwei) reference the year 1666, when Sir Isaac Newton conducted an experiment which today, is considered ”as a landmark discovery in the study of optics and color theory”. The piece consists of fifteen triangular blocks on a white surface, with colourful projections shining upon them, refracting and creating a performance of light. In “Lost in Pascal’s Triangle”, the mathematician’s triangle theory is magnified in the form of one-hundred LED triangles that are within their own fluorescent triangular holds. Audiences are encouraged to interact with the piece through a xylophone, which “generate[s] a series of music and lighting sequences”.

For more examples of their works, you can visit Super Nature Design’s website here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ anna paluch Super Nature Design Dreamscape New Angles PRISMA1666 Lost in Pascal's Triangle optics light technology optical illusion Wonwei geometry interactive art art science art and science journal LED hypercube dimensions media art design shanghai
Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch
Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch
Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch
Recycling New Technologies
When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.
But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?
Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.
Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.
-Anna Paluch

Recycling New Technologies

When the term ‘computer art’ is thrown around, it is safe to assume that some people automatically think about art that is created using digital mediums.

But what about ‘computer art’ as art that is made, literally, from parts of a computer?

Multimedia artist Leonard Ulian takes inspiration from traditional artistic practices such as sand mandalas and book binding, and combines this inspiration with various electrical components, computer parts and copper wire. Mimicking two time consuming traditional practices, Ulian’s work can be interpreted as creating a network between traditional and contemporary, or in the case of the mandalas specifically, comparing spiritual and ritualistic representations of the universe with the artist’s own fascination in how systems can be applied to the process of art making.

Similarly, mixed-media artist Anna Dabrowska, better known as Finnabair, takes inspiration from a Victorian-era style of art to create her ‘steampunk’ collages using found objects such as computer parts. The artist herself describe her practice as “industrial art, cyberpunk art, or artistic upcycling”, taking modern technologies that have been deemed obsolete, thrown out, and applying them to traditional art practices.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ Leonard Ulian Finnabair Anna Dabrowska computer art recycle art technology art science mandala book binding steampunk upcycling art and science journal
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch
Home Sweet Home
Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).
With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 
With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.
Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?
A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.
-Anna Paluch

Home Sweet Home

Usually plastic and the environment do not go hand in hand, but artist Aki Inomata uses plastic to create an environment for her little pet hermit crabs in “Why Not Hand Over a “Shelter” to Hermit Crabs?” (2009, 2010-2013).

With the help of CT scanning to render a three-dimensional model of an empty shell, Inomata creates her base and then builds houses atop these shell renderings. These architectural wonders mimic the style of popular dwellings, from Tokyo house-style to Paris apartments. 

With these plastic hermit crab habitats, Inomata wanted to explore not only the hermit crab’s adaptability to new surroundings, but how we adapt as well. Immigration, relocation, even acquiring a new identity or nationality is more or less the human version of growing out of a shell, and finding a new one to call ‘home’.

Not only is this series an amazing symbolic representation of our will to adapt, but also a fun way to learn more about the life and physiology of the hermit crab, as the dwellings are completely see-through. Have you ever wondered what a hermit crab’s body looks like inside its shell?

A video of both the hermit crabs in action and how the artist came about designing the shells can be found here.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ aki inomata anna paluch hermit crabs animals shells plastic scanning technology 3D Printing art science art and science journal ct scan shelter home physiology architecture biology

As artist Leo Selvaggio attests to in his video above, privacy is becoming a precious commodity. With the ever-increasing prevalence of technology and mobile devices, it’s difficult to maintain a low profile. Many of our actions, both online and out and about, are being recorded and surveilled, either on a camera or by virtually tracking our positions via mobile devices. This has driven Selvaggio to create a work of art and a hacking device that allows for its wearer to walk about undetected by the cameras that surveil them - URME Surveillance. Pronounced “you-are-me”, this device is a 3-D printed rubber mask manufactured by ThatsMyFace.com. The level of rendering is realistic enough to fool the facial recognition software, so that every person wearing the mask is recognized as Leo Selvaggio, not themselves.

Selvaggio has been living and working in Chicago, stating in his video that it is the most surveilled city in America - with over 25,000 cameras rigged with military-grade facial recognition software, it’s easy to see why Selvaggio would want to create some sort of bypass for those who would rather not be monitored. Instead of hiding the public’s face, Selvaggio is giving them a new one, “protecting the public from surveillance and creating a safe space to explore our digital identities.”

Aside from the rubber mask, URME Surveillance has two other products available to users: a paper mask, best worn in large groups, and a video encryption software that places Selvaggio’s face over those that appear in the video. Selvaggio is aware of the less savory activities that these masks could be used for, but insists that URME Surveillance is an “organized artistic intervention”, driven by a desire to allow an individual the ability to “assert themselves in a public space”. As such, it is expected that these devices are used responsibly by those who choose to wear them. 

To learn more about URME Surveillance or support its Indiegogo campaign, click here.

- Lea Hamilton 

(source)

URME SurveillanceLeo Selvaggioarthackingmask3d printingtechnologysurveillanceartandsciencejournalLea Hamilton
Light Up the Skies
When two artists with different aesthetic backgrounds collaborate, they often create stunning pieces, and the collaboration between artist’s Aaron Koblin and Janet Echelman is no exception.
Janet Echelman, who has been featured already on Art & Science Journal, creates fishnet-like aerial sculptures that look as if they were floating entities in the sky. The nets’ shapes are manipulated to form anything from funnels to winged creatures. Aaron Koblin is an artist and designer who focuses on data and digital technologies, how this information relates to cultural trends and how people react to changing technologies.
These artists collaborated together on March 15, 2014 at TED 2014 to create “Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks” outside the Vancouver Convention Centre where the TED talks were being held. TED is integral to this installation, as the two artists met at TED 2011 after their talks. In order to make such an installation possible, Echelman needed the expertise of Autodesk, a 3D design engineering software that specializes in working with interesting design problems. The amazing feature about this outdoor installation is that passersby can choreograph the lights on the web with their smartphones, controlling the aesthetic nature of the piece through technology.
If you would like to see how a sculpture of this magnitude was imagined, and then installed, TED blog has a ‘making-of’ gallery.
The installation will be up in Vancouver until the 22nd of March, 2014.
-Anna Paluch
Light Up the Skies
When two artists with different aesthetic backgrounds collaborate, they often create stunning pieces, and the collaboration between artist’s Aaron Koblin and Janet Echelman is no exception.
Janet Echelman, who has been featured already on Art & Science Journal, creates fishnet-like aerial sculptures that look as if they were floating entities in the sky. The nets’ shapes are manipulated to form anything from funnels to winged creatures. Aaron Koblin is an artist and designer who focuses on data and digital technologies, how this information relates to cultural trends and how people react to changing technologies.
These artists collaborated together on March 15, 2014 at TED 2014 to create “Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks” outside the Vancouver Convention Centre where the TED talks were being held. TED is integral to this installation, as the two artists met at TED 2011 after their talks. In order to make such an installation possible, Echelman needed the expertise of Autodesk, a 3D design engineering software that specializes in working with interesting design problems. The amazing feature about this outdoor installation is that passersby can choreograph the lights on the web with their smartphones, controlling the aesthetic nature of the piece through technology.
If you would like to see how a sculpture of this magnitude was imagined, and then installed, TED blog has a ‘making-of’ gallery.
The installation will be up in Vancouver until the 22nd of March, 2014.
-Anna Paluch

Light Up the Skies

When two artists with different aesthetic backgrounds collaborate, they often create stunning pieces, and the collaboration between artist’s Aaron Koblin and Janet Echelman is no exception.

Janet Echelman, who has been featured already on Art & Science Journal, creates fishnet-like aerial sculptures that look as if they were floating entities in the sky. The nets’ shapes are manipulated to form anything from funnels to winged creatures. Aaron Koblin is an artist and designer who focuses on data and digital technologies, how this information relates to cultural trends and how people react to changing technologies.

These artists collaborated together on March 15, 2014 at TED 2014 to create “Skies Painted with Unnumbered Sparks” outside the Vancouver Convention Centre where the TED talks were being held. TED is integral to this installation, as the two artists met at TED 2011 after their talks. In order to make such an installation possible, Echelman needed the expertise of Autodesk, a 3D design engineering software that specializes in working with interesting design problems. The amazing feature about this outdoor installation is that passersby can choreograph the lights on the web with their smartphones, controlling the aesthetic nature of the piece through technology.

If you would like to see how a sculpture of this magnitude was imagined, and then installed, TED blog has a ‘making-of’ gallery.

The installation will be up in Vancouver until the 22nd of March, 2014.

-Anna Paluch

2 Photos
/ Janet Echelman Aarron Koblin TED Vancouver webs technology engineering anna paluch art science art and science journal autodesk
Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck
Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.
Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.
For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.
- Victoria Nolte
Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck
Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.
Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.
For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.
- Victoria Nolte

Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck

Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.

Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.

For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.

- Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ art technology urban fiction 2.0 petra gemeinboeck locative media participatory art installation victoria nolte
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones
Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?
The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.
With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.
Visit the MeMo website.
- Lee Jones

Can Technology Help Us Deal With Death?

The MeMo Organization, a project by Jessica Charlesworth, uses an imagined company and a series of objects to question whether technology could help soften the blow of the feelings surrounding death. Titled based on the latin phrase, memento mori, meaning, “remember that you will die” this project exhibit combines stories of life and loves loss with the objects that cause or represent the demise of the dead. Charlesworth accompanies each of the seven stories of the MeMo Organization with objects that enhance the story and make gentle the experience of mourning and loss.

With the help of technology, those depicted can practice alternative memento mori rituals. Though you are never told who the characters are, and only read a small portion of their life and death, you understand and empathize with their love and experience the intimacy they shared. As a means to the end of all life, death is undoubtedly, one facet that many fear; not as much for the loss of life for oneself, but the experience of losing one so close. The MeMo Organization provides a visualization of hope that with all technology now affords us, that the feelings that result from losing a loved one can be softened.

Visit the MeMo website.

- Lee Jones

8 Photos
/ art design death jessica charlesworth MeMo technology

Hoverboards Just Became Real (or Not?) - HUVrTech

Came across this video online and just had to share. A company called HUVrTech has launched a hoverboard set to be released in December 2014. Whether it’s real or not, it’s definitely a brilliant marketing stunt. 

Here’s their story:

"What began as a summer project in 2010 at the MIT Physics Graduate Program has evolved into one of the most exciting independent products to be developed out of MIT since the high-powered lithium-ion batteries developed by Yet-Ming Chiang in 2001. Our team consists of materials science, electricity & magnetism experts who’ve solved an important part of one of science’s mysteries: the key to antigravity.

The HUVr Board team ultimately aims to improve the efficiency, speed and sustainability of mass transportation. Yet rather than spend several more years closed off from the world while investing in research and development, the team and our world-class investors have worked to change the economics R&D by marketing this exciting consumer product in order to fund ongoing R&D.”

Visit their website here

- Lee Jones

arthoverboardhuvrtechdesigntechnology

Contact Us

For submissions: please send images and a detailed description to our editor, Lee Jones, at leejones@artandsciencejournal.com.
Thank you and have a lovely day!