Our Blog

Posts tagged tree

Categories:

Connections: The Tree of Life and Death
Connections are everywhere, be they symbolic or literal. Every connection has its purpose, from the tiny fibers of an adult human fibroblast cell, which connects (or adheres) to extracellular matrixes, to trees, with their deep roots, connecting themselves to the ground. See, even these two seemingly different objects, with their own unique connections, can also find a way to be connected to each other. A photograph of a network of adult human fibroblast cells looks oddly similar to that of a pink tree (taken by Heather Champ) found in San Francisco, but, where the cells actually help produce more cells, more life, the pink tree is in fact, dead. It can no longer grow or blossom, like the cells in their own way. That does not mean this tree cannot still be admired aesthetically in some way.
An unknown artist, upon hearing of the death of the tree, decided to give it new life by transforming it into a small but significant urban art piece. Though it was taken down not long after, it shows that even when dead, natural objects such as trees can still be used to make beautiful art.
So artists go one step further, and create art long after a tree has been cut down and transformed into a new object; a piece of paper. Artist Emma Taylor creates a series of work called “From Within A Book” where she takes pages of a book and sculpts various scenes, such as a stork carrying a baby or a person reading a book. One work that particularly stands out is that of a large tree, coming out from between two pages. It reminded me of the pink tree, and even of the fibroblast cells.  Like the pink tree, the tree used to make the pages is long dead, but the artist has taken the pages, connecting them together like cells, to create a new tree. 
Though not truly living, it is an echo of its former self, and yet, still as beautiful. The tree seems to be one of few natural objects that can be beautiful and inspiring in both life and death.-Anna Paluch
Connections: The Tree of Life and Death
Connections are everywhere, be they symbolic or literal. Every connection has its purpose, from the tiny fibers of an adult human fibroblast cell, which connects (or adheres) to extracellular matrixes, to trees, with their deep roots, connecting themselves to the ground. See, even these two seemingly different objects, with their own unique connections, can also find a way to be connected to each other. A photograph of a network of adult human fibroblast cells looks oddly similar to that of a pink tree (taken by Heather Champ) found in San Francisco, but, where the cells actually help produce more cells, more life, the pink tree is in fact, dead. It can no longer grow or blossom, like the cells in their own way. That does not mean this tree cannot still be admired aesthetically in some way.
An unknown artist, upon hearing of the death of the tree, decided to give it new life by transforming it into a small but significant urban art piece. Though it was taken down not long after, it shows that even when dead, natural objects such as trees can still be used to make beautiful art.
So artists go one step further, and create art long after a tree has been cut down and transformed into a new object; a piece of paper. Artist Emma Taylor creates a series of work called “From Within A Book” where she takes pages of a book and sculpts various scenes, such as a stork carrying a baby or a person reading a book. One work that particularly stands out is that of a large tree, coming out from between two pages. It reminded me of the pink tree, and even of the fibroblast cells.  Like the pink tree, the tree used to make the pages is long dead, but the artist has taken the pages, connecting them together like cells, to create a new tree. 
Though not truly living, it is an echo of its former self, and yet, still as beautiful. The tree seems to be one of few natural objects that can be beautiful and inspiring in both life and death.-Anna Paluch
Connections: The Tree of Life and Death
Connections are everywhere, be they symbolic or literal. Every connection has its purpose, from the tiny fibers of an adult human fibroblast cell, which connects (or adheres) to extracellular matrixes, to trees, with their deep roots, connecting themselves to the ground. See, even these two seemingly different objects, with their own unique connections, can also find a way to be connected to each other. A photograph of a network of adult human fibroblast cells looks oddly similar to that of a pink tree (taken by Heather Champ) found in San Francisco, but, where the cells actually help produce more cells, more life, the pink tree is in fact, dead. It can no longer grow or blossom, like the cells in their own way. That does not mean this tree cannot still be admired aesthetically in some way.
An unknown artist, upon hearing of the death of the tree, decided to give it new life by transforming it into a small but significant urban art piece. Though it was taken down not long after, it shows that even when dead, natural objects such as trees can still be used to make beautiful art.
So artists go one step further, and create art long after a tree has been cut down and transformed into a new object; a piece of paper. Artist Emma Taylor creates a series of work called “From Within A Book” where she takes pages of a book and sculpts various scenes, such as a stork carrying a baby or a person reading a book. One work that particularly stands out is that of a large tree, coming out from between two pages. It reminded me of the pink tree, and even of the fibroblast cells.  Like the pink tree, the tree used to make the pages is long dead, but the artist has taken the pages, connecting them together like cells, to create a new tree. 
Though not truly living, it is an echo of its former self, and yet, still as beautiful. The tree seems to be one of few natural objects that can be beautiful and inspiring in both life and death.-Anna Paluch
Connections: The Tree of Life and Death
Connections are everywhere, be they symbolic or literal. Every connection has its purpose, from the tiny fibers of an adult human fibroblast cell, which connects (or adheres) to extracellular matrixes, to trees, with their deep roots, connecting themselves to the ground. See, even these two seemingly different objects, with their own unique connections, can also find a way to be connected to each other. A photograph of a network of adult human fibroblast cells looks oddly similar to that of a pink tree (taken by Heather Champ) found in San Francisco, but, where the cells actually help produce more cells, more life, the pink tree is in fact, dead. It can no longer grow or blossom, like the cells in their own way. That does not mean this tree cannot still be admired aesthetically in some way.
An unknown artist, upon hearing of the death of the tree, decided to give it new life by transforming it into a small but significant urban art piece. Though it was taken down not long after, it shows that even when dead, natural objects such as trees can still be used to make beautiful art.
So artists go one step further, and create art long after a tree has been cut down and transformed into a new object; a piece of paper. Artist Emma Taylor creates a series of work called “From Within A Book” where she takes pages of a book and sculpts various scenes, such as a stork carrying a baby or a person reading a book. One work that particularly stands out is that of a large tree, coming out from between two pages. It reminded me of the pink tree, and even of the fibroblast cells.  Like the pink tree, the tree used to make the pages is long dead, but the artist has taken the pages, connecting them together like cells, to create a new tree. 
Though not truly living, it is an echo of its former self, and yet, still as beautiful. The tree seems to be one of few natural objects that can be beautiful and inspiring in both life and death.-Anna Paluch

Connections: The Tree of Life and Death

Connections are everywhere, be they symbolic or literal. Every connection has its purpose, from the tiny fibers of an adult human fibroblast cell, which connects (or adheres) to extracellular matrixes, to trees, with their deep roots, connecting themselves to the ground. See, even these two seemingly different objects, with their own unique connections, can also find a way to be connected to each other. A photograph of a network of adult human fibroblast cells looks oddly similar to that of a pink tree (taken by Heather Champ) found in San Francisco, but, where the cells actually help produce more cells, more life, the pink tree is in fact, dead. It can no longer grow or blossom, like the cells in their own way. That does not mean this tree cannot still be admired aesthetically in some way.

An unknown artist, upon hearing of the death of the tree, decided to give it new life by transforming it into a small but significant urban art piece. Though it was taken down not long after, it shows that even when dead, natural objects such as trees can still be used to make beautiful art.

So artists go one step further, and create art long after a tree has been cut down and transformed into a new object; a piece of paper. Artist Emma Taylor creates a series of work called “From Within A Book” where she takes pages of a book and sculpts various scenes, such as a stork carrying a baby or a person reading a book. One work that particularly stands out is that of a large tree, coming out from between two pages. It reminded me of the pink tree, and even of the fibroblast cells.  Like the pink tree, the tree used to make the pages is long dead, but the artist has taken the pages, connecting them together like cells, to create a new tree.

Though not truly living, it is an echo of its former self, and yet, still as beautiful. The tree seems to be one of few natural objects that can be beautiful and inspiring in both life and death.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art and science journal art science tree street art cell biology book art paper sculpture anna paluch emma taylor heather champ
The Future of Nature in Art
The forms of nature are, in their own ways, works of art. For centuries, artists have mimicked natural phenomenon, such as the roughness of tree bark, and the vibrant colours of fruit, in oil paintings and even sculpture. Now, most artists are using new tools to attempt to control these forms, and in doing so, re-create the natural form. Artist Ken To, for example, uses metal wiring to create detailed and realistically sized bonsai trees. The easing twists of the metal perfectly mimic the tree bark, that ever so slightly curves up and outwards, creating branches. 
Even more extreme, artist Natalie Jeremijenko uses L-systems, which are algorithms created in order to mimic the cell growth of a tree. With the L-system technology, you could have your very own forest growing on your computers’ desktop! She has even created a whole art project called ONETREES, and she calls her virtual trees ‘e-trees’, or ‘electronic trees’. Not only that, the e-trees themselves can be manipulated to grow at certain rates when a CO2 reader is plugged into the USB ports of the computer. The virtual trees mimic the cell growth of natural trees, and they also react in a similar way that trees do when they come into contact with atmospheric changes. It is a revolutionary twist of artistic mimesis.
So whether you prefer a forest of trees on your desktop, or a little bonsai tree on top of your desk, there are many different mediums that you can explore in order to experience this new movement of nature mimesis in the 21st Century.-Anna Paluch

The Future of Nature in Art

The forms of nature are, in their own ways, works of art. For centuries, artists have mimicked natural phenomenon, such as the roughness of tree bark, and the vibrant colours of fruit, in oil paintings and even sculpture. Now, most artists are using new tools to attempt to control these forms, and in doing so, re-create the natural form. Artist Ken To, for example, uses metal wiring to create detailed and realistically sized bonsai trees. The easing twists of the metal perfectly mimic the tree bark, that ever so slightly curves up and outwards, creating branches.

Even more extreme, artist Natalie Jeremijenko uses L-systems, which are algorithms created in order to mimic the cell growth of a tree. With the L-system technology, you could have your very own forest growing on your computers’ desktop! She has even created a whole art project called ONETREES, and she calls her virtual trees ‘e-trees’, or ‘electronic trees’. Not only that, the e-trees themselves can be manipulated to grow at certain rates when a CO2 reader is plugged into the USB ports of the computer. The virtual trees mimic the cell growth of natural trees, and they also react in a similar way that trees do when they come into contact with atmospheric changes. It is a revolutionary twist of artistic mimesis.

So whether you prefer a forest of trees on your desktop, or a little bonsai tree on top of your desk, there are many different mediums that you can explore in order to experience this new movement of nature mimesis in the 21st Century.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

art science artandsciencejournal ken to natalie jeremijenko L-systems tree mimesis future nature bonsai sculpture screen Anna Paluch
Jonathan Callan
In his most recent works, Jonathan Callan uses books to create organic forms. What’s interesting about the piece above is how the materials harken back to their original form. The paper from the book was once a tree, and now it is being used to create the form of a tree once more. This environmental narrative runs throughout Callan’s work, yet most articles seem to focus on the use of colour or shape. I agree that his works are aesthetically beautiful, but in this case I think the materials are key to the message.  How ironic is it that the tree went through the process of becoming paper, only to become a tree once more. A lot of waste for nothing, right? To see more of Callan’s work, click here. 
- Lee Jones

Contact Us

Please include your email address