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Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck
Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.
Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.
For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.
- Victoria Nolte
Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck
Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.
Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.
For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.
- Victoria Nolte

Weaving the Invisible Thread: Urban Fiction 2.0 by Petra Gemeinboeck

Urban Fiction 2.0 is a participatory installation that deploys locative devices and social media. Enacted in Sydney, Australia, the installation is activated by participants through a special mobile app that allows them to “weave an imaginary lace over Sydney’s urban and social landscape.”

With the app, users can move through physical space and cause disturbances to the imaginary “lace” projected onto a GPS rendering of the city. As the app measures the movements of each participant in real time, any motion or disturbance caused will immediately alter the virtual lace.

Images of lace, fabric, and thread symbolize the urban and social sphere and point to the idea of each participant’s role as a networked actor, moving through the space and collectively tracing their paths. An example of locative art, Urban Fiction 2.0 allows users to feel a heightened sense of awareness of their positions in the imaginary lacy grid of the city and in the physical space they occupy. With a nod to the locative capabilities of Web 2.0 platforms, Urban Fiction 2.0 enables participants to “weave” their own experiences into the model of the city grid, issuing a sense of their actions in the broader context of a networked society.

For more information about Petra Gemeinboeck’s work, please visit her website here.

- Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ art technology urban fiction 2.0 petra gemeinboeck locative media participatory art installation victoria nolte

At Street-Level 
Narrow, dizzying, and at times simultaneously hazardous and peaceful, streets are the arteries that pulsate life through the heart of a city. Life simply happens here: through daily routines enacted at street-level. At this vantage point, we are faced the gritty aspects of urban life. 
In his Street Scapes (2012) series, Austrian designer Jaak Kaevats contextualizes and visualizes cities at street-level. Using a technique that simultaneously gathers and visualizes urban data, Kaevats produces images that exemplify more natural demographic information. These visualizations capture content that more accurately demonstrates experiences at street-level, such as the speed and direction of the people in motion. 
Each visualization demonstrates a five minute timeline. The movements of the people walking in the street are plotted in one direction, highlighting their distances relative to each other. Objects not in motion are blurred in the background, making the representations of the people the dominant elements of the image. In contextualizing the data into an image, Kaevats excluded personalized information, leaving each figure in the image anonymous. This programatic gesture further authenticates the urban experience witnessed here, as street life generally allows urban dwellers to move through the street with easy anonymity. 
Visit Kaevats’s website for more information about his design work. 
- Victoria Nolte

At Street-Level 
Narrow, dizzying, and at times simultaneously hazardous and peaceful, streets are the arteries that pulsate life through the heart of a city. Life simply happens here: through daily routines enacted at street-level. At this vantage point, we are faced the gritty aspects of urban life. 
In his Street Scapes (2012) series, Austrian designer Jaak Kaevats contextualizes and visualizes cities at street-level. Using a technique that simultaneously gathers and visualizes urban data, Kaevats produces images that exemplify more natural demographic information. These visualizations capture content that more accurately demonstrates experiences at street-level, such as the speed and direction of the people in motion. 
Each visualization demonstrates a five minute timeline. The movements of the people walking in the street are plotted in one direction, highlighting their distances relative to each other. Objects not in motion are blurred in the background, making the representations of the people the dominant elements of the image. In contextualizing the data into an image, Kaevats excluded personalized information, leaving each figure in the image anonymous. This programatic gesture further authenticates the urban experience witnessed here, as street life generally allows urban dwellers to move through the street with easy anonymity. 
Visit Kaevats’s website for more information about his design work. 
- Victoria Nolte

At Street-Level 
Narrow, dizzying, and at times simultaneously hazardous and peaceful, streets are the arteries that pulsate life through the heart of a city. Life simply happens here: through daily routines enacted at street-level. At this vantage point, we are faced the gritty aspects of urban life. 
In his Street Scapes (2012) series, Austrian designer Jaak Kaevats contextualizes and visualizes cities at street-level. Using a technique that simultaneously gathers and visualizes urban data, Kaevats produces images that exemplify more natural demographic information. These visualizations capture content that more accurately demonstrates experiences at street-level, such as the speed and direction of the people in motion. 
Each visualization demonstrates a five minute timeline. The movements of the people walking in the street are plotted in one direction, highlighting their distances relative to each other. Objects not in motion are blurred in the background, making the representations of the people the dominant elements of the image. In contextualizing the data into an image, Kaevats excluded personalized information, leaving each figure in the image anonymous. This programatic gesture further authenticates the urban experience witnessed here, as street life generally allows urban dwellers to move through the street with easy anonymity. 
Visit Kaevats’s website for more information about his design work. 
- Victoria Nolte

At Street-Level 
Narrow, dizzying, and at times simultaneously hazardous and peaceful, streets are the arteries that pulsate life through the heart of a city. Life simply happens here: through daily routines enacted at street-level. At this vantage point, we are faced the gritty aspects of urban life. 
In his Street Scapes (2012) series, Austrian designer Jaak Kaevats contextualizes and visualizes cities at street-level. Using a technique that simultaneously gathers and visualizes urban data, Kaevats produces images that exemplify more natural demographic information. These visualizations capture content that more accurately demonstrates experiences at street-level, such as the speed and direction of the people in motion. 
Each visualization demonstrates a five minute timeline. The movements of the people walking in the street are plotted in one direction, highlighting their distances relative to each other. Objects not in motion are blurred in the background, making the representations of the people the dominant elements of the image. In contextualizing the data into an image, Kaevats excluded personalized information, leaving each figure in the image anonymous. This programatic gesture further authenticates the urban experience witnessed here, as street life generally allows urban dwellers to move through the street with easy anonymity. 
Visit Kaevats’s website for more information about his design work. 
- Victoria Nolte

At Street-Level 

Narrow, dizzying, and at times simultaneously hazardous and peaceful, streets are the arteries that pulsate life through the heart of a city. Life simply happens here: through daily routines enacted at street-level. At this vantage point, we are faced the gritty aspects of urban life. 

In his Street Scapes (2012) series, Austrian designer Jaak Kaevats contextualizes and visualizes cities at street-level. Using a technique that simultaneously gathers and visualizes urban data, Kaevats produces images that exemplify more natural demographic information. These visualizations capture content that more accurately demonstrates experiences at street-level, such as the speed and direction of the people in motion. 

Each visualization demonstrates a five minute timeline. The movements of the people walking in the street are plotted in one direction, highlighting their distances relative to each other. Objects not in motion are blurred in the background, making the representations of the people the dominant elements of the image. In contextualizing the data into an image, Kaevats excluded personalized information, leaving each figure in the image anonymous. This programatic gesture further authenticates the urban experience witnessed here, as street life generally allows urban dwellers to move through the street with easy anonymity. 

Visit Kaevats’s website for more information about his design work. 

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art technology demographics street level street scapes timeline jaak kaevats victoria nolte

Mobile Performance: Social Media Usage in Kasia Molga’s The… 

The mobile nature of smartphones and related devices sees everyday life as a series of performances. In a world where a “social media presence” is just as important as a presence in “real” life, mobile technology now dictates everything from what we eat (so we can put it on Instagram) to who we hang out with (so we can tag them on Facebook). When we follow any particular social media feed, we witness this series of performances in a constant stream. 
This constant connection to our mobile world questions the authenticity of our thoughts and experiences. If life events are essentially performed for the sake of a tweet, to what extent are they genuine? Have we stopped “doing for the sake of living” in order to create more seemingly dynamic and exciting experiences? Are we, therefore, actually living or just catering to the attentions of our audience? 
One way we can consider the effects of social media is through its intersection with the contemporary art world. Social media has allowed us to connect with galleries and artists on this performative level, receiving information and inspiration from these sources on a daily basis. Galleries become proprietors of art world knowledge and we can practically discover their collections and content without actually visiting them. In addition, many contemporary artists have employed social media in their own works. Web artist Brian Piana’s Ellsworth Kelly Hacked My Twitter, for example, is a real-time collage made from the tweets by people the artist follows on Twitter. The tweets are reduced to a representational colour (based from the user’s avatar) and placed on a grid that represents every individual tweet that has come through the artist’s Twitter feed. Through this generative work, Piana exposes social media as both a device to cultivate a digital presence, and as a device that can simultaneously reduce the value of one’s message to a wall of anonymous colour. 
Based on feeds from Twitter, Kasia Molga’s interactive installation, The… explores the idea of social media as a mobile performance and questions the authenticity of our collective thought process. Inspired by David Bohm’s concept of the origins of thought, Molga is interested in determining if our own thoughts are purely influenced by the ideas of others. In Molga’s installation, each tweet represents an “original” thought. Her employment of social media is essential to this project because it presents a seemingly thoughtless stream of messages that burdens the viewer with the task of deciphering true original content. 
The… is generated with the use of a Kinect controller that detects the body shapes of the gallery’s visitors. A set of algorithms pulls tweets that feature a specific hashtag from a live Twitter feed. The tweets float for a few seconds above the bodily shapes on screen, interacting with the viewers’ gestures. The tweets become conversational pieces and viewers can theoretically alter what appears on the screen by sending another tweet with the chosen hashtag. 
Digital media is an important medium in Molga’s art practice, which seeks to deal with the “aesthetics of interconnectedness.” This state of interconnectivity allows for a constant awareness of the thoughts, feelings, and experiences of those around us. By performing a mobile persona cultivated through social media, we are always constructing and re-constructing the stories of our lives. Our followers, often friends, family, and co-workers, are therefore privy to our everyday experiences without even conversing with us. 
More information about Kaisa Molga’s work can be found on her website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Mobile Performance is a reoccurring A&SJ series that explores contemporary digital art practices with a particular focus on the use of mobile technologies. This article is the first edition of the series. 

Mobile Performance: Social Media Usage in Kasia Molga’s The… 

The mobile nature of smartphones and related devices sees everyday life as a series of performances. In a world where a “social media presence” is just as important as a presence in “real” life, mobile technology now dictates everything from what we eat (so we can put it on Instagram) to who we hang out with (so we can tag them on Facebook). When we follow any particular social media feed, we witness this series of performances in a constant stream. 

This constant connection to our mobile world questions the authenticity of our thoughts and experiences. If life events are essentially performed for the sake of a tweet, to what extent are they genuine? Have we stopped “doing for the sake of living” in order to create more seemingly dynamic and exciting experiences? Are we, therefore, actually living or just catering to the attentions of our audience? 

One way we can consider the effects of social media is through its intersection with the contemporary art world. Social media has allowed us to connect with galleries and artists on this performative level, receiving information and inspiration from these sources on a daily basis. Galleries become proprietors of art world knowledge and we can practically discover their collections and content without actually visiting them. In addition, many contemporary artists have employed social media in their own works. Web artist Brian Piana’s Ellsworth Kelly Hacked My Twitter, for example, is a real-time collage made from the tweets by people the artist follows on Twitter. The tweets are reduced to a representational colour (based from the user’s avatar) and placed on a grid that represents every individual tweet that has come through the artist’s Twitter feed. Through this generative work, Piana exposes social media as both a device to cultivate a digital presence, and as a device that can simultaneously reduce the value of one’s message to a wall of anonymous colour. 

Based on feeds from Twitter, Kasia Molga’s interactive installation, The… explores the idea of social media as a mobile performance and questions the authenticity of our collective thought process. Inspired by David Bohm’s concept of the origins of thought, Molga is interested in determining if our own thoughts are purely influenced by the ideas of others. In Molga’s installation, each tweet represents an “original” thought. Her employment of social media is essential to this project because it presents a seemingly thoughtless stream of messages that burdens the viewer with the task of deciphering true original content. 

The… is generated with the use of a Kinect controller that detects the body shapes of the gallery’s visitors. A set of algorithms pulls tweets that feature a specific hashtag from a live Twitter feed. The tweets float for a few seconds above the bodily shapes on screen, interacting with the viewers’ gestures. The tweets become conversational pieces and viewers can theoretically alter what appears on the screen by sending another tweet with the chosen hashtag. 

Digital media is an important medium in Molga’s art practice, which seeks to deal with the “aesthetics of interconnectedness.” This state of interconnectivity allows for a constant awareness of the thoughts, feelings, and experiences of those around us. By performing a mobile persona cultivated through social media, we are always constructing and re-constructing the stories of our lives. Our followers, often friends, family, and co-workers, are therefore privy to our everyday experiences without even conversing with us. 

More information about Kaisa Molga’s work can be found on her website

Victoria Nolte

Mobile Performance is a reoccurring A&SJ series that explores contemporary digital art practices with a particular focus on the use of mobile technologies. This article is the first edition of the series. 

art installation social media mobile performance twitter kasia molga victoria nolte
99 Red Beacons by Britta Evans-Fenton
Today’s widespread use of the Internet and evolving forms of digital and social media has allowed us to be constantly plugged into our various communicative devices. This dependence on the web has essentially blurred the lines between the individual and the collective. As our devices allow us to become digital beacons, we shed our anonymity and remain in constant contact with the world around us.
Where would we be without the Internet?
With many of these issues in mind, Ottawa-based artist Britta Evans-Fenton (who we have featured on our blog before) has proposed an installation/performance piece that highlights the ubiquity of digital communication and sheds light on the unusual history of the Internet. The installation will be part of this year’s installment of Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau. 
Britta’s inspiration for this project comes from the German Cold War protest song, “99 Luftballons” by Nena. As Britta discovered in her research, the technology that has developed into the World Wide Web was originally developed through Cold War military funding. The song references the military’s influence over lines of communication and comments on the paranoia and hysteria associated with war.
99 Red Beacons is a roaming installation featuring 99 blinking red balloons. Volunteers will carry the balloons around the city as they emit anonymous Morse code messages written by members of the Canadian Armed Forces. The physical presence of the balloons, gliding in the air, is likened to the image of the millions of messages that “float” through the air as they travel between phones, computers, tablets, and e-readers. In this sense, the balloons serve as a reminder of the prevalence of digital messaging, while the messages written by Canadian soldiers refer to the Internet’s origins as a military-funded form of communication.
Look for 99 Red Beacons on September 21, 2013 during Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau!
- Victoria Nolte
99 Red Beacons by Britta Evans-Fenton
Today’s widespread use of the Internet and evolving forms of digital and social media has allowed us to be constantly plugged into our various communicative devices. This dependence on the web has essentially blurred the lines between the individual and the collective. As our devices allow us to become digital beacons, we shed our anonymity and remain in constant contact with the world around us.
Where would we be without the Internet?
With many of these issues in mind, Ottawa-based artist Britta Evans-Fenton (who we have featured on our blog before) has proposed an installation/performance piece that highlights the ubiquity of digital communication and sheds light on the unusual history of the Internet. The installation will be part of this year’s installment of Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau. 
Britta’s inspiration for this project comes from the German Cold War protest song, “99 Luftballons” by Nena. As Britta discovered in her research, the technology that has developed into the World Wide Web was originally developed through Cold War military funding. The song references the military’s influence over lines of communication and comments on the paranoia and hysteria associated with war.
99 Red Beacons is a roaming installation featuring 99 blinking red balloons. Volunteers will carry the balloons around the city as they emit anonymous Morse code messages written by members of the Canadian Armed Forces. The physical presence of the balloons, gliding in the air, is likened to the image of the millions of messages that “float” through the air as they travel between phones, computers, tablets, and e-readers. In this sense, the balloons serve as a reminder of the prevalence of digital messaging, while the messages written by Canadian soldiers refer to the Internet’s origins as a military-funded form of communication.
Look for 99 Red Beacons on September 21, 2013 during Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau!
- Victoria Nolte

99 Red Beacons by Britta Evans-Fenton

Today’s widespread use of the Internet and evolving forms of digital and social media has allowed us to be constantly plugged into our various communicative devices. This dependence on the web has essentially blurred the lines between the individual and the collective. As our devices allow us to become digital beacons, we shed our anonymity and remain in constant contact with the world around us.

Where would we be without the Internet?

With many of these issues in mind, Ottawa-based artist Britta Evans-Fenton (who we have featured on our blog before) has proposed an installation/performance piece that highlights the ubiquity of digital communication and sheds light on the unusual history of the Internet. The installation will be part of this year’s installment of Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau.

Britta’s inspiration for this project comes from the German Cold War protest song, “99 Luftballons” by Nena. As Britta discovered in her research, the technology that has developed into the World Wide Web was originally developed through Cold War military funding. The song references the military’s influence over lines of communication and comments on the paranoia and hysteria associated with war.

99 Red Beacons is a roaming installation featuring 99 blinking red balloons. Volunteers will carry the balloons around the city as they emit anonymous Morse code messages written by members of the Canadian Armed Forces. The physical presence of the balloons, gliding in the air, is likened to the image of the millions of messages that “float” through the air as they travel between phones, computers, tablets, and e-readers. In this sense, the balloons serve as a reminder of the prevalence of digital messaging, while the messages written by Canadian soldiers refer to the Internet’s origins as a military-funded form of communication.

Look for 99 Red Beacons on September 21, 2013 during Nuit Blanche Ottawa + Gatineau!

- Victoria Nolte

2 Photos
/ art technology installation britta evans-fenton nuit blanche ottawa victoria nolte

Exploring Colour, Space, and Tape: Installations by Rebecca Ward
The contemporary practice of artfully transforming spaces with temporal, time-sensitive, and often delicate materials is a personal interest of mine. These site-specific works often reflect so much of the world around us - offering instances of momentary wonder that can be erased from consciousness without a moment’s notice. It’s this preoccupation with ephemeral ideas and presentations that drives the production of site-specific installation. 
This temporal feeling is achieved through the medium of Rebecca Ward’s colourful works. Ward’s primary interest in exploring geometric space through colour, texture, and light led to her use of tape (electrical tape, painter’s tape, masking tape, etc.) to create intricate spatial transformations. Of course, these installations are entirely impressive in person as the spaces Ward alters rely on a direct association to the viewer - the manipulation of space at work in Ward’s installations constantly shifting with each viewer interaction. 
The sense of temporality is therefore also achieved through individual interactions on the part of the viewer, with each viewer experiencing a different element or angle of the installation. 
Ward’s installations also successfully expose architectural elements and unique structures through her mathematical and geometric application of tape. The result is a playful and colourful interjection in an otherwise empty space, a gesture that can be seen as a re-invention of the postmodern tradition of the “white cube” gallery. 
For more information about Rebecca’s works, please visit her website. 
- Victoria Nolte

Exploring Colour, Space, and Tape: Installations by Rebecca Ward
The contemporary practice of artfully transforming spaces with temporal, time-sensitive, and often delicate materials is a personal interest of mine. These site-specific works often reflect so much of the world around us - offering instances of momentary wonder that can be erased from consciousness without a moment’s notice. It’s this preoccupation with ephemeral ideas and presentations that drives the production of site-specific installation. 
This temporal feeling is achieved through the medium of Rebecca Ward’s colourful works. Ward’s primary interest in exploring geometric space through colour, texture, and light led to her use of tape (electrical tape, painter’s tape, masking tape, etc.) to create intricate spatial transformations. Of course, these installations are entirely impressive in person as the spaces Ward alters rely on a direct association to the viewer - the manipulation of space at work in Ward’s installations constantly shifting with each viewer interaction. 
The sense of temporality is therefore also achieved through individual interactions on the part of the viewer, with each viewer experiencing a different element or angle of the installation. 
Ward’s installations also successfully expose architectural elements and unique structures through her mathematical and geometric application of tape. The result is a playful and colourful interjection in an otherwise empty space, a gesture that can be seen as a re-invention of the postmodern tradition of the “white cube” gallery. 
For more information about Rebecca’s works, please visit her website. 
- Victoria Nolte

Exploring Colour, Space, and Tape: Installations by Rebecca Ward
The contemporary practice of artfully transforming spaces with temporal, time-sensitive, and often delicate materials is a personal interest of mine. These site-specific works often reflect so much of the world around us - offering instances of momentary wonder that can be erased from consciousness without a moment’s notice. It’s this preoccupation with ephemeral ideas and presentations that drives the production of site-specific installation. 
This temporal feeling is achieved through the medium of Rebecca Ward’s colourful works. Ward’s primary interest in exploring geometric space through colour, texture, and light led to her use of tape (electrical tape, painter’s tape, masking tape, etc.) to create intricate spatial transformations. Of course, these installations are entirely impressive in person as the spaces Ward alters rely on a direct association to the viewer - the manipulation of space at work in Ward’s installations constantly shifting with each viewer interaction. 
The sense of temporality is therefore also achieved through individual interactions on the part of the viewer, with each viewer experiencing a different element or angle of the installation. 
Ward’s installations also successfully expose architectural elements and unique structures through her mathematical and geometric application of tape. The result is a playful and colourful interjection in an otherwise empty space, a gesture that can be seen as a re-invention of the postmodern tradition of the “white cube” gallery. 
For more information about Rebecca’s works, please visit her website. 
- Victoria Nolte

Exploring Colour, Space, and Tape: Installations by Rebecca Ward
The contemporary practice of artfully transforming spaces with temporal, time-sensitive, and often delicate materials is a personal interest of mine. These site-specific works often reflect so much of the world around us - offering instances of momentary wonder that can be erased from consciousness without a moment’s notice. It’s this preoccupation with ephemeral ideas and presentations that drives the production of site-specific installation. 
This temporal feeling is achieved through the medium of Rebecca Ward’s colourful works. Ward’s primary interest in exploring geometric space through colour, texture, and light led to her use of tape (electrical tape, painter’s tape, masking tape, etc.) to create intricate spatial transformations. Of course, these installations are entirely impressive in person as the spaces Ward alters rely on a direct association to the viewer - the manipulation of space at work in Ward’s installations constantly shifting with each viewer interaction. 
The sense of temporality is therefore also achieved through individual interactions on the part of the viewer, with each viewer experiencing a different element or angle of the installation. 
Ward’s installations also successfully expose architectural elements and unique structures through her mathematical and geometric application of tape. The result is a playful and colourful interjection in an otherwise empty space, a gesture that can be seen as a re-invention of the postmodern tradition of the “white cube” gallery. 
For more information about Rebecca’s works, please visit her website. 
- Victoria Nolte

Exploring Colour, Space, and Tape: Installations by Rebecca Ward

The contemporary practice of artfully transforming spaces with temporal, time-sensitive, and often delicate materials is a personal interest of mine. These site-specific works often reflect so much of the world around us - offering instances of momentary wonder that can be erased from consciousness without a moment’s notice. It’s this preoccupation with ephemeral ideas and presentations that drives the production of site-specific installation. 

This temporal feeling is achieved through the medium of Rebecca Ward’s colourful works. Ward’s primary interest in exploring geometric space through colour, texture, and light led to her use of tape (electrical tape, painter’s tape, masking tape, etc.) to create intricate spatial transformations. Of course, these installations are entirely impressive in person as the spaces Ward alters rely on a direct association to the viewer - the manipulation of space at work in Ward’s installations constantly shifting with each viewer interaction. 

The sense of temporality is therefore also achieved through individual interactions on the part of the viewer, with each viewer experiencing a different element or angle of the installation. 

Ward’s installations also successfully expose architectural elements and unique structures through her mathematical and geometric application of tape. The result is a playful and colourful interjection in an otherwise empty space, a gesture that can be seen as a re-invention of the postmodern tradition of the “white cube” gallery. 

For more information about Rebecca’s works, please visit her website

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art geometry installation tape temporal site-specific artscij rebecca ward victoria nolte

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki
Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 
Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 
Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 
Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 
- Victoria Nolte

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki
Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 
Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 
Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 
Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 
- Victoria Nolte

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki
Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 
Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 
Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 
Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 
- Victoria Nolte

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki
Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 
Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 
Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 
Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 
- Victoria Nolte

Mythologies and Meanings: Masako Miki

Artists have often attributed qualities of the surreal “other” to the animal world. Our animal counterparts are seen by many as being devoid of cultural instincts that restrict and normalize behaviour. They are thus able to act out the lascivious instincts humans work to eradicate and symbolize myths of collisions between natural and human worlds. 

Drawing from this playbook of animal subjects and myth, California based artist Masako Miki establishes dreamlike identity narratives while toying with the psychology behind animal motifs in fine art. Her animal subjects become symbols through which our fantasies, desires, and vulnerabilities may be realized. Like Surrealist artists before her, Miki’s interest in exploring the dreamy and symbolic nature of animal life permits new mythologies in the dynamic relations between animals and humans to emerge. 

Moreover, through a very simple aesthetic, the animal motifs Miki explores in her delicate paintings - a combination of a variety of mixed media, including rainbow-hued embroidery thread, gouache, ink, and wool - receive a quirky and contemporary upgrade. No longer resembling grandiose historical nature paintings or cheesy, kitschy, oil-on-panel paintings found in your grandparents’ attic, Miki’s mediations on identity, folklore, and animalistic roles are visually simplified and accessible, resembling the visual quality of a peculiar and conversational painting found in the living room of a student apartment. 

Masako Miki is represented by the Swarm Gallery in Oakland, CA. 

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art nature animals myth motif painting masako miki victoria nolte

The Art and Science of Linen
Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 
This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 
Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 
For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

The Art and Science of Linen
Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 
This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 
Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 
For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

The Art and Science of Linen
Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 
This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 
Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 
For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

The Art and Science of Linen

Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 

This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 

Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 

For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ artscience video bacteria linen cultural history anna dumitriu alex may victoria nolte bioart

Valerie Hegarty: Foreboding Nature
There is a certain uneasiness attributed to the works of installation artist Valerie Hegarty. The unsettling “end-of-the-world-cometh” feeling that continuously plays into so many of our nightmares. Does there exist a truly disparaging force that could annihilate humanity in the blink of an eye? 
In the works featured above, nature is seen as a destructive force, manipulated by Hegarty in a reconstruction and ultimate destruction of landscape, portraiture, and still life traditions. Hegarty’s extension of these mediums allows the natural elements of her work to take on a sculptural form; to perform bodily gestures that burst through faultily constructed canvases into gallery space. 
From her studio in New York, Hegarty collects objects with cultural significance, often recreating masterworks of landscape paintings or historical portraits, and applies various forces of the natural world to rearrange and, ultimately, destroy them. However, in this desolation occurs a sort of rebirth as Hegarty is able to expose important cultural truths and re-imagine elements of cultural history. 
In this sense, it would seem that Hegarty’s practice is to expose the triumph of nature over the oppressive forces of colonialism, historicism, and culture. In the destruction of these artefacts, Hegarty exposes the elements of our known history gone awry and proposes an alternate history of the justified prevail of nature over humanity. 
Hegarty’s current exhibition, Alternate Histories, which further explores the destruction of colonial historical artefacts, is currently open at the Brooklyn Museum until December 1, 2013. 
Please visit Hegarty’s website for more examples of her work. 
- Victoria Nolte

Valerie Hegarty: Foreboding Nature
There is a certain uneasiness attributed to the works of installation artist Valerie Hegarty. The unsettling “end-of-the-world-cometh” feeling that continuously plays into so many of our nightmares. Does there exist a truly disparaging force that could annihilate humanity in the blink of an eye? 
In the works featured above, nature is seen as a destructive force, manipulated by Hegarty in a reconstruction and ultimate destruction of landscape, portraiture, and still life traditions. Hegarty’s extension of these mediums allows the natural elements of her work to take on a sculptural form; to perform bodily gestures that burst through faultily constructed canvases into gallery space. 
From her studio in New York, Hegarty collects objects with cultural significance, often recreating masterworks of landscape paintings or historical portraits, and applies various forces of the natural world to rearrange and, ultimately, destroy them. However, in this desolation occurs a sort of rebirth as Hegarty is able to expose important cultural truths and re-imagine elements of cultural history. 
In this sense, it would seem that Hegarty’s practice is to expose the triumph of nature over the oppressive forces of colonialism, historicism, and culture. In the destruction of these artefacts, Hegarty exposes the elements of our known history gone awry and proposes an alternate history of the justified prevail of nature over humanity. 
Hegarty’s current exhibition, Alternate Histories, which further explores the destruction of colonial historical artefacts, is currently open at the Brooklyn Museum until December 1, 2013. 
Please visit Hegarty’s website for more examples of her work. 
- Victoria Nolte

Valerie Hegarty: Foreboding Nature
There is a certain uneasiness attributed to the works of installation artist Valerie Hegarty. The unsettling “end-of-the-world-cometh” feeling that continuously plays into so many of our nightmares. Does there exist a truly disparaging force that could annihilate humanity in the blink of an eye? 
In the works featured above, nature is seen as a destructive force, manipulated by Hegarty in a reconstruction and ultimate destruction of landscape, portraiture, and still life traditions. Hegarty’s extension of these mediums allows the natural elements of her work to take on a sculptural form; to perform bodily gestures that burst through faultily constructed canvases into gallery space. 
From her studio in New York, Hegarty collects objects with cultural significance, often recreating masterworks of landscape paintings or historical portraits, and applies various forces of the natural world to rearrange and, ultimately, destroy them. However, in this desolation occurs a sort of rebirth as Hegarty is able to expose important cultural truths and re-imagine elements of cultural history. 
In this sense, it would seem that Hegarty’s practice is to expose the triumph of nature over the oppressive forces of colonialism, historicism, and culture. In the destruction of these artefacts, Hegarty exposes the elements of our known history gone awry and proposes an alternate history of the justified prevail of nature over humanity. 
Hegarty’s current exhibition, Alternate Histories, which further explores the destruction of colonial historical artefacts, is currently open at the Brooklyn Museum until December 1, 2013. 
Please visit Hegarty’s website for more examples of her work. 
- Victoria Nolte

Valerie Hegarty: Foreboding Nature
There is a certain uneasiness attributed to the works of installation artist Valerie Hegarty. The unsettling “end-of-the-world-cometh” feeling that continuously plays into so many of our nightmares. Does there exist a truly disparaging force that could annihilate humanity in the blink of an eye? 
In the works featured above, nature is seen as a destructive force, manipulated by Hegarty in a reconstruction and ultimate destruction of landscape, portraiture, and still life traditions. Hegarty’s extension of these mediums allows the natural elements of her work to take on a sculptural form; to perform bodily gestures that burst through faultily constructed canvases into gallery space. 
From her studio in New York, Hegarty collects objects with cultural significance, often recreating masterworks of landscape paintings or historical portraits, and applies various forces of the natural world to rearrange and, ultimately, destroy them. However, in this desolation occurs a sort of rebirth as Hegarty is able to expose important cultural truths and re-imagine elements of cultural history. 
In this sense, it would seem that Hegarty’s practice is to expose the triumph of nature over the oppressive forces of colonialism, historicism, and culture. In the destruction of these artefacts, Hegarty exposes the elements of our known history gone awry and proposes an alternate history of the justified prevail of nature over humanity. 
Hegarty’s current exhibition, Alternate Histories, which further explores the destruction of colonial historical artefacts, is currently open at the Brooklyn Museum until December 1, 2013. 
Please visit Hegarty’s website for more examples of her work. 
- Victoria Nolte

Valerie Hegarty: Foreboding Nature
There is a certain uneasiness attributed to the works of installation artist Valerie Hegarty. The unsettling “end-of-the-world-cometh” feeling that continuously plays into so many of our nightmares. Does there exist a truly disparaging force that could annihilate humanity in the blink of an eye? 
In the works featured above, nature is seen as a destructive force, manipulated by Hegarty in a reconstruction and ultimate destruction of landscape, portraiture, and still life traditions. Hegarty’s extension of these mediums allows the natural elements of her work to take on a sculptural form; to perform bodily gestures that burst through faultily constructed canvases into gallery space. 
From her studio in New York, Hegarty collects objects with cultural significance, often recreating masterworks of landscape paintings or historical portraits, and applies various forces of the natural world to rearrange and, ultimately, destroy them. However, in this desolation occurs a sort of rebirth as Hegarty is able to expose important cultural truths and re-imagine elements of cultural history. 
In this sense, it would seem that Hegarty’s practice is to expose the triumph of nature over the oppressive forces of colonialism, historicism, and culture. In the destruction of these artefacts, Hegarty exposes the elements of our known history gone awry and proposes an alternate history of the justified prevail of nature over humanity. 
Hegarty’s current exhibition, Alternate Histories, which further explores the destruction of colonial historical artefacts, is currently open at the Brooklyn Museum until December 1, 2013. 
Please visit Hegarty’s website for more examples of her work. 
- Victoria Nolte

Valerie Hegarty: Foreboding Nature

There is a certain uneasiness attributed to the works of installation artist Valerie Hegarty. The unsettling “end-of-the-world-cometh” feeling that continuously plays into so many of our nightmares. Does there exist a truly disparaging force that could annihilate humanity in the blink of an eye? 

In the works featured above, nature is seen as a destructive force, manipulated by Hegarty in a reconstruction and ultimate destruction of landscape, portraiture, and still life traditions. Hegarty’s extension of these mediums allows the natural elements of her work to take on a sculptural form; to perform bodily gestures that burst through faultily constructed canvases into gallery space. 

From her studio in New York, Hegarty collects objects with cultural significance, often recreating masterworks of landscape paintings or historical portraits, and applies various forces of the natural world to rearrange and, ultimately, destroy them. However, in this desolation occurs a sort of rebirth as Hegarty is able to expose important cultural truths and re-imagine elements of cultural history. 

In this sense, it would seem that Hegarty’s practice is to expose the triumph of nature over the oppressive forces of colonialism, historicism, and culture. In the destruction of these artefacts, Hegarty exposes the elements of our known history gone awry and proposes an alternate history of the justified prevail of nature over humanity. 

Hegarty’s current exhibition, Alternate Histories, which further explores the destruction of colonial historical artefacts, is currently open at the Brooklyn Museum until December 1, 2013. 

Please visit Hegarty’s website for more examples of her work. 

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ art science nature artscience valerie hegarty installation victoria nolte


ART + COM: Manta Rhei
Founded in 1988 by a group of designers, scientists, artists, and technicians, ART + COM is a company committed to the exploration of new media and technology. The company designs and executes commissioned projects for clients such as the German Salt Museum, the BMW Museum, and Autostadt Wolfsburg. Based in Berlin, ART + COM relies on both the content of their projects and cutting edge technology to produce commissions that establish new innovative boundaries between the fields of art, design, science, and technology.

Manta Rhei (2012) is ART + COM’s newest completed project. A collaboration between ART + COM and light fixture manufacturer Selux, “Manta Rhei merges physical movement and light choreography for a new kind of luminaire, the first to be based in OLED technology.” 
More than a simple light installation, Manta Rhei is a performance of impressive choreography and machinery. Composed of sets of ten OLEDs which are attached to fourteen 1.2m flexible metal “lamellae,” the installation shifts with the aid of motors hidden in the ceiling. Each motor can be controlled individually, allowing each set of lamellae to perform patterns of prescribed motion. 
Suspended from the ceiling, Manta Rhei looks like a large-scale Minimalist sculpture, a testament to its design aesthetic. However, the individual movements of each metal lamel allow the entire installation to appear as if it is moving though the air. This important design feature provides the added element of functionality that blurs the line between art, design, and technology. Manta Rhei is as functional as a light source as it is a breathtaking art/tech installation. 
For more information about Manta Rhei and other projects by ART + COM, please visit their website here. 
- Victoria Nolte


ART + COM: Manta Rhei
Founded in 1988 by a group of designers, scientists, artists, and technicians, ART + COM is a company committed to the exploration of new media and technology. The company designs and executes commissioned projects for clients such as the German Salt Museum, the BMW Museum, and Autostadt Wolfsburg. Based in Berlin, ART + COM relies on both the content of their projects and cutting edge technology to produce commissions that establish new innovative boundaries between the fields of art, design, science, and technology.

Manta Rhei (2012) is ART + COM’s newest completed project. A collaboration between ART + COM and light fixture manufacturer Selux, “Manta Rhei merges physical movement and light choreography for a new kind of luminaire, the first to be based in OLED technology.” 
More than a simple light installation, Manta Rhei is a performance of impressive choreography and machinery. Composed of sets of ten OLEDs which are attached to fourteen 1.2m flexible metal “lamellae,” the installation shifts with the aid of motors hidden in the ceiling. Each motor can be controlled individually, allowing each set of lamellae to perform patterns of prescribed motion. 
Suspended from the ceiling, Manta Rhei looks like a large-scale Minimalist sculpture, a testament to its design aesthetic. However, the individual movements of each metal lamel allow the entire installation to appear as if it is moving though the air. This important design feature provides the added element of functionality that blurs the line between art, design, and technology. Manta Rhei is as functional as a light source as it is a breathtaking art/tech installation. 
For more information about Manta Rhei and other projects by ART + COM, please visit their website here. 
- Victoria Nolte


ART + COM: Manta Rhei
Founded in 1988 by a group of designers, scientists, artists, and technicians, ART + COM is a company committed to the exploration of new media and technology. The company designs and executes commissioned projects for clients such as the German Salt Museum, the BMW Museum, and Autostadt Wolfsburg. Based in Berlin, ART + COM relies on both the content of their projects and cutting edge technology to produce commissions that establish new innovative boundaries between the fields of art, design, science, and technology.

Manta Rhei (2012) is ART + COM’s newest completed project. A collaboration between ART + COM and light fixture manufacturer Selux, “Manta Rhei merges physical movement and light choreography for a new kind of luminaire, the first to be based in OLED technology.” 
More than a simple light installation, Manta Rhei is a performance of impressive choreography and machinery. Composed of sets of ten OLEDs which are attached to fourteen 1.2m flexible metal “lamellae,” the installation shifts with the aid of motors hidden in the ceiling. Each motor can be controlled individually, allowing each set of lamellae to perform patterns of prescribed motion. 
Suspended from the ceiling, Manta Rhei looks like a large-scale Minimalist sculpture, a testament to its design aesthetic. However, the individual movements of each metal lamel allow the entire installation to appear as if it is moving though the air. This important design feature provides the added element of functionality that blurs the line between art, design, and technology. Manta Rhei is as functional as a light source as it is a breathtaking art/tech installation. 
For more information about Manta Rhei and other projects by ART + COM, please visit their website here. 
- Victoria Nolte


ART + COM: Manta Rhei
Founded in 1988 by a group of designers, scientists, artists, and technicians, ART + COM is a company committed to the exploration of new media and technology. The company designs and executes commissioned projects for clients such as the German Salt Museum, the BMW Museum, and Autostadt Wolfsburg. Based in Berlin, ART + COM relies on both the content of their projects and cutting edge technology to produce commissions that establish new innovative boundaries between the fields of art, design, science, and technology.

Manta Rhei (2012) is ART + COM’s newest completed project. A collaboration between ART + COM and light fixture manufacturer Selux, “Manta Rhei merges physical movement and light choreography for a new kind of luminaire, the first to be based in OLED technology.” 
More than a simple light installation, Manta Rhei is a performance of impressive choreography and machinery. Composed of sets of ten OLEDs which are attached to fourteen 1.2m flexible metal “lamellae,” the installation shifts with the aid of motors hidden in the ceiling. Each motor can be controlled individually, allowing each set of lamellae to perform patterns of prescribed motion. 
Suspended from the ceiling, Manta Rhei looks like a large-scale Minimalist sculpture, a testament to its design aesthetic. However, the individual movements of each metal lamel allow the entire installation to appear as if it is moving though the air. This important design feature provides the added element of functionality that blurs the line between art, design, and technology. Manta Rhei is as functional as a light source as it is a breathtaking art/tech installation. 
For more information about Manta Rhei and other projects by ART + COM, please visit their website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

ART + COM: Manta Rhei

Founded in 1988 by a group of designers, scientists, artists, and technicians, ART + COM is a company committed to the exploration of new media and technology. The company designs and executes commissioned projects for clients such as the German Salt Museum, the BMW Museum, and Autostadt Wolfsburg. Based in Berlin, ART + COM relies on both the content of their projects and cutting edge technology to produce commissions that establish new innovative boundaries between the fields of art, design, science, and technology.

Manta Rhei (2012) is ART + COM’s newest completed project. A collaboration between ART + COM and light fixture manufacturer Selux, “Manta Rhei merges physical movement and light choreography for a new kind of luminaire, the first to be based in OLED technology.” 

More than a simple light installation, Manta Rhei is a performance of impressive choreography and machinery. Composed of sets of ten OLEDs which are attached to fourteen 1.2m flexible metal “lamellae,” the installation shifts with the aid of motors hidden in the ceiling. Each motor can be controlled individually, allowing each set of lamellae to perform patterns of prescribed motion. 

Suspended from the ceiling, Manta Rhei looks like a large-scale Minimalist sculpture, a testament to its design aesthetic. However, the individual movements of each metal lamel allow the entire installation to appear as if it is moving though the air. This important design feature provides the added element of functionality that blurs the line between art, design, and technology. Manta Rhei is as functional as a light source as it is a breathtaking art/tech installation. 

For more information about Manta Rhei and other projects by ART + COM, please visit their website here

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ art technology art + com manta rhei OLED minimalism installation victoria nolte artscij

Reads and Zines with The Universe Within 
In The Universe Within, Neil Shubin ambitiously traces the history of the universe and the story of evolution through the bodies and remains of all living things on Earth. Seeking to better understand how we have come to be, Shubin’s quest results in the discovery of connections between human and animal physiologies and the wider cosmos. While this may seem like a rather difficult and and confusing connection to make, the book reads so much like an adventure novel that you forget it is actually a work of scientific inquiry that ultimately shifts the way we see humanity. 
Shubin, a prominent palaeontologist, provides fascinating facts and stimulating comparisons easily understood by anyone with even the slightest knowledge of science, astronomy, biology, and evolution. However, Shubin by no means “dumbs down” the science he writes about here. Instead, his enthusiasm for scientific discourse shines through in his highly entertaining and enthusiastic writing style. 
Shubin’s enthusiasm is notedly demonstrated in his recounting of major historic anecdotes that pepper his research. One example is Shubin’s account of how geologists Marie Tharp and Bruce Heezen mapped the ocean floor and how their discovery of mid-ocean ridges ultimately led to our contemporary theories of continental drift and the Earth’s tectonic plates. Shubin’s focus on the stories of major discoveries, as well as the science behind them, reads like an account of how the undertakings of various scientific disciplines are all connected by a shared desire to unearth the secrets of life in the universe.
Overall, I found this book ambitious, quick paced, and highly enjoyable. A definite must-read for a slightly more basic understanding of how the universe was formed and how forces in the cosmos and on Earth have shaped our contemporary world. 
For more information about Dr. Shubin and The Universe Within, visit his website here. The Universe Within is available on Amazon for $18.15 CAD. 
- Victoria Nolte

Reads and Zines with The Universe Within 
In The Universe Within, Neil Shubin ambitiously traces the history of the universe and the story of evolution through the bodies and remains of all living things on Earth. Seeking to better understand how we have come to be, Shubin’s quest results in the discovery of connections between human and animal physiologies and the wider cosmos. While this may seem like a rather difficult and and confusing connection to make, the book reads so much like an adventure novel that you forget it is actually a work of scientific inquiry that ultimately shifts the way we see humanity. 
Shubin, a prominent palaeontologist, provides fascinating facts and stimulating comparisons easily understood by anyone with even the slightest knowledge of science, astronomy, biology, and evolution. However, Shubin by no means “dumbs down” the science he writes about here. Instead, his enthusiasm for scientific discourse shines through in his highly entertaining and enthusiastic writing style. 
Shubin’s enthusiasm is notedly demonstrated in his recounting of major historic anecdotes that pepper his research. One example is Shubin’s account of how geologists Marie Tharp and Bruce Heezen mapped the ocean floor and how their discovery of mid-ocean ridges ultimately led to our contemporary theories of continental drift and the Earth’s tectonic plates. Shubin’s focus on the stories of major discoveries, as well as the science behind them, reads like an account of how the undertakings of various scientific disciplines are all connected by a shared desire to unearth the secrets of life in the universe.
Overall, I found this book ambitious, quick paced, and highly enjoyable. A definite must-read for a slightly more basic understanding of how the universe was formed and how forces in the cosmos and on Earth have shaped our contemporary world. 
For more information about Dr. Shubin and The Universe Within, visit his website here. The Universe Within is available on Amazon for $18.15 CAD. 
- Victoria Nolte

Reads and Zines with The Universe Within 

In The Universe Within, Neil Shubin ambitiously traces the history of the universe and the story of evolution through the bodies and remains of all living things on Earth. Seeking to better understand how we have come to be, Shubin’s quest results in the discovery of connections between human and animal physiologies and the wider cosmos. While this may seem like a rather difficult and and confusing connection to make, the book reads so much like an adventure novel that you forget it is actually a work of scientific inquiry that ultimately shifts the way we see humanity. 

Shubin, a prominent palaeontologist, provides fascinating facts and stimulating comparisons easily understood by anyone with even the slightest knowledge of science, astronomy, biology, and evolution. However, Shubin by no means “dumbs down” the science he writes about here. Instead, his enthusiasm for scientific discourse shines through in his highly entertaining and enthusiastic writing style. 

Shubin’s enthusiasm is notedly demonstrated in his recounting of major historic anecdotes that pepper his research. One example is Shubin’s account of how geologists Marie Tharp and Bruce Heezen mapped the ocean floor and how their discovery of mid-ocean ridges ultimately led to our contemporary theories of continental drift and the Earth’s tectonic plates. Shubin’s focus on the stories of major discoveries, as well as the science behind them, reads like an account of how the undertakings of various scientific disciplines are all connected by a shared desire to unearth the secrets of life in the universe.

Overall, I found this book ambitious, quick paced, and highly enjoyable. A definite must-read for a slightly more basic understanding of how the universe was formed and how forces in the cosmos and on Earth have shaped our contemporary world. 

For more information about Dr. Shubin and The Universe Within, visit his website hereThe Universe Within is available on Amazon for $18.15 CAD. 

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ reads & zines review the universe within neil shubin palaeontology cosmos literature victoria nolte

Contact Us

For submissions: please send images and a detailed description to our editor, Lee Jones, at leejones@artandsciencejournal.com.
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