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Pacific Flower by Rachael Rakena
The artwork of Rachael Rakena, a Maori artist from New Zealand, is both ethereal and political in nature, harmonizing two opposing concepts through digital art. As a Maori person, Rachael uses digital art forms to contribute to the discussions on contemporary Maori art (and artists). Using such technologies, Rachael combines traditional Maori philosophies and contemporary ideas of identity, to create a continuum and movement in the spaces of her work.
One of Rachael’s artworks, Pacific Flower (2008) is a series of digital still images, where the women floating in water are warped and fragmented to create geometric shapes of themselves. Given the name, Pacific Flower, the viewer is left to assume that the women in the works are either of Maori descent, or of another Indigenous culture from the Pacific region, specifically, those who would call themselves Polynesian. The use of water in not just this piece, but all of the artists’ works, is important to her personally, as it is a tribal space, that presents the Maori identity as one that is deeply connected to not just the land, but the water around the land, as well as acting like an amniotic fluid, metaphorically protecting the culture of her people.
A work that both promotes the use of digital mediums and playing with natural elements, Rachael Rakena’s Pacific Flower series also uses these mediums to emphasize on her cultural identity. Digital imagery, a contemporary art form, and water, a natural element that has been around forever, compliment the nature behind the artists’ work; one of finding a balance with keeping a cultural identity alive, in an ever-changing and contemporising world.-Anna Paluch
Pacific Flower by Rachael Rakena
The artwork of Rachael Rakena, a Maori artist from New Zealand, is both ethereal and political in nature, harmonizing two opposing concepts through digital art. As a Maori person, Rachael uses digital art forms to contribute to the discussions on contemporary Maori art (and artists). Using such technologies, Rachael combines traditional Maori philosophies and contemporary ideas of identity, to create a continuum and movement in the spaces of her work.
One of Rachael’s artworks, Pacific Flower (2008) is a series of digital still images, where the women floating in water are warped and fragmented to create geometric shapes of themselves. Given the name, Pacific Flower, the viewer is left to assume that the women in the works are either of Maori descent, or of another Indigenous culture from the Pacific region, specifically, those who would call themselves Polynesian. The use of water in not just this piece, but all of the artists’ works, is important to her personally, as it is a tribal space, that presents the Maori identity as one that is deeply connected to not just the land, but the water around the land, as well as acting like an amniotic fluid, metaphorically protecting the culture of her people.
A work that both promotes the use of digital mediums and playing with natural elements, Rachael Rakena’s Pacific Flower series also uses these mediums to emphasize on her cultural identity. Digital imagery, a contemporary art form, and water, a natural element that has been around forever, compliment the nature behind the artists’ work; one of finding a balance with keeping a cultural identity alive, in an ever-changing and contemporising world.-Anna Paluch

Pacific Flower by Rachael Rakena

The artwork of Rachael Rakena, a Maori artist from New Zealand, is both ethereal and political in nature, harmonizing two opposing concepts through digital art. As a Maori person, Rachael uses digital art forms to contribute to the discussions on contemporary Maori art (and artists). Using such technologies, Rachael combines traditional Maori philosophies and contemporary ideas of identity, to create a continuum and movement in the spaces of her work.

One of Rachael’s artworks, Pacific Flower (2008) is a series of digital still images, where the women floating in water are warped and fragmented to create geometric shapes of themselves. Given the name, Pacific Flower, the viewer is left to assume that the women in the works are either of Maori descent, or of another Indigenous culture from the Pacific region, specifically, those who would call themselves Polynesian. The use of water in not just this piece, but all of the artists’ works, is important to her personally, as it is a tribal space, that presents the Maori identity as one that is deeply connected to not just the land, but the water around the land, as well as acting like an amniotic fluid, metaphorically protecting the culture of her people.

A work that both promotes the use of digital mediums and playing with natural elements, Rachael Rakena’s Pacific Flower series also uses these mediums to emphasize on her cultural identity. Digital imagery, a contemporary art form, and water, a natural element that has been around forever, compliment the nature behind the artists’ work; one of finding a balance with keeping a cultural identity alive, in an ever-changing and contemporising world.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

2 Photos
/ Rachael Rakena Maori art digital art video pacific polynesian maori indigenous identity art science art and science journal anna paluch

Enter the Box


When watching the video 
Box (2013), it feels like watching a clip of a film studio’s 3-D graphics reel. In fact, Box is a live-performance piece created by the group Bot & Dolly that challenges the viewers perceptions of space and surface, by projecting images onto a moving box. Sounds simple enough, but the optical illusions that the performance creates questions logical space. An object goes from flat to three-dimensional within seconds, and then even within the structure, three-dimensional shapes begin to form.

The technology used behind this performance is called projection-mapping, where the projector follows the object perfectly, making it seem like a living thing, rather than a sedentary shape. Aside from projection mapping and a bit of human help, the whole project is controlled by robotics and engineering software, coming together to challenge the limits of artistic and technical expression.

If you haven’t already watched the video take a look! Feel yourself get hypnotized by the visual display on your screen. Imagine the endless possibilities of self-expression that can come from this type of technology.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

scienceartanna paluchboxprojectionvideoart and science journalbox & dollyroboticsengineeringsoftwareoptical illusiontechnology

Biological Kaleidescope


Not much can be said (or more precisely, not much is known) about artist
Dave Razor’s video work Fingered (2013), which can actually be seen as a blessing, as this give us, the viewers, an opportunity to interpret his work however we wish.

One thing that caught my attention was that the kaleidoscope of hands always seemed to find their way to a biological form often seen in nature. One minute, the hands come together to make a bird, flapping its wings, and the next, the hands are mimicking the flowing structure of a nautilus shell. The monochromatic video creates a mixture of feelings; awe from the fluidity of the movement of the fingers, and mild disgust at the thought of so many hands, coming towards you.

The ‘squish’ sounds during the video don’t help either, but whether you hate it or love it, Dave Razor’s video piece is a great example of video montaging and editing at its finest.

Like an artsy homage to the shadow hand puppets most of us learned to do as children.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

dave razoranna paluchartscienceart and science journalvideomontagefingerskaleidoscope

Ruslan Khasanov’s Pacific Light

Some work resists classification, challenging the boundaries that exist between different mediums. This is the case in the recent project of photographer and graphic designer Ruslan Khasanov, Pacific Light. What began as a fascination with the separation of oil and soy sauce translated into experimentation with ink, oil and soap, of which Khasanov has created still images as well as video. This isn’t a completely foreign concept - I seem to remember doing something similar as a child in a classroom setting. However, the result here is a captivating spectacle with arguably strong formal ties to drawing, or what this phaidon article calls “animated drawings” or even “liquid sculptures”. Some of the stills seem to mimic microscopic cellular activity, whereas other stills are simply more abstract images exploring form and colour.

- Katherine Lawson

artsciencevideoruslan khasanovpacific lightvimeofluids
The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon
Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.
The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.
Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.
To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.
- Lea Hamilton
The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon
Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.
The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.
Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.
To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.
- Lea Hamilton
The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon
Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.
The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.
Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.
To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.
- Lea Hamilton
The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon
Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.
The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.
Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.
To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.
- Lea Hamilton

The Drawing Machines of Harvey Moon

Collaborations between artists are not uncommon, especially if two artists have different sets of talents, but share the same vision. What usually results is a finished, co-authored piece that both artists can take credit for. This notion of authorship within a collaborated work is questioned by new media artist Harvey Moon, who ‘extends the capabilities of his own system’ by collaborating with his Drawing Machines.

The Drawing Machine itself initially started off as a servo and two motors, run by an Arduino that is programmed with an algorithm telling it how to move the pen across the page. Moon has sophisticated his machines from the original model, using new algorithms to express himself in his unique works of art. Moon actually views himself as a producer more than as an artist; he creates the rules and systems in which the Drawing Machine can create, and then he lets the machine run as it pleases. The notion of relinquishing of artistic license to his robots is a concept that Moon is continually interested in.

Harvey Moon is currently using his drawing machine to create a series of works that takes satellite images from Google Earth. By drawing these places at random, and without knowing where it will draw next, the drawing machine is creating an ‘impossible map’ that is based off of the miscommunication between machines.

To view the interview with the artist and see the machines in action, check out this video here.

Lea Hamilton

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ Harvey Moon Lea Hamilton drawing machine technology arduino collaboration processing robot video art drawing machine Art and Science Journal

From Sound to Light, By Talking to Walls

Everyone has experienced an echo - a sound reverberating and bouncing off an object back to its original source. Echoes happen both in natural and urban settings, whether it’s someone shouting triumphantly into a canyon or the simple sound of traffic in a tunnel. Now, imagine what it would be like to be able to see what the sound waves of an echo look like. Murmur is a device that does exactly that, on a higher level: it collects sounds made physically by people and visualizes them virtually on a LED wall.

Created through the collaboration of four different French studios (Chevalvert, 2roqs, Polygraphik and Splank), the installation sets out to bridge the gap between physical and virtual worlds. Each studio contributed their own expertise in visual design, object design, sound design and programming to bring the project to life. What Murmur essentially does is simulate the transformation sound waves into light waves. By speaking into the “Echo Chamber” of the device, the ‘murmurs’ of the public and passers-by are collected and transmitted through a cord onto the LED wall. The animations focus on movement, reacting differently to different types of sound. The resulting effect is magical indeed, creating a new dialogue between the movement of the public and the architecture of the room.

You can read the full story and philosophy behind Murmur here.

-Lea Hamilton 

Sources: Creative Applications, Amusement, The Verge, Murmur

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

LightSoundVisualizationvideodigitalLEDChevalvert2roqsPolygraphikSplankMurmuranimationechoinstallationprogrammingLea Hamiltonart and science journaltechnology

The Art and Science of Linen
Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 
This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 
Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 
For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

The Art and Science of Linen
Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 
This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 
Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 
For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

The Art and Science of Linen
Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 
This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 
Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 
For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here. 
- Victoria Nolte

The Art and Science of Linen

Cultural history and biology collide in this video artwork created by artists Anna Dumitriu and Alex May. With the aid of microbiologist Dr. John Paul, Dumitriu and May trace methods of linen production from the late nineteenth century and locate the precise culture of bacteria integral to this production. 

In “Le Microbiologie du Sol,” an influential text by pioneering microbiologist Sergei Winogradsky, the bacterium Clostridium pasteurianum is located as the prime bacterial culture responsible for the process of separating flax fibres from plant stems in linen production. May and Dumitriu build from this discovery in the above video, recreating the process to exemplify methods of production. 

This video can be seen as an act of preservation, with the focus on the textures of antique linens made from natural and cultivated resources a desire to uphold historical production and design traditions. The cultural importance the video places on this process of linen creation exhibits a disconnect with synthetic fibres used in contemporary clothing and textile design, demonstrating a rich artistic and biological history that synthetic fibres lack. 

Dumitriu and May are both artists whose art works focus on the blurred boundaries between art, science, and new technologies. By using a range of untraditional artistic mediums, such as bacteria, robotics, textiles, and digital media, both artists seek to demonstrate the perception of technology and reality. 

For more information about The Art and Science of Linen, please visit Alex May’s website here

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ artscience video bacteria linen cultural history anna dumitriu alex may victoria nolte bioart
Doug Aitken's Mirror at the Seattle Art Museum

American multimedia and light artist Doug Aitken’s new installation Mirror strives to be a living museum, a dynamic representation of the constantly changing urban core of Seattle. Installed permanently on the north-west corner of the Seattle Art Museum, Mirror was unveiled this past Sunday and has since been received very warmly by the online community. 
Described as a “living kaleidoscope,” the installation responds to changes in weather conditions, pedestrian movement, and lighting conditions. Referring to its reservoir of hundreds of hours of video footage, the installation uses data from its sensors to compose these moving images, choreographing them in unexpected ways. Most interestingly, the installation has been programmed in such a way that the same sequence never occurs twice — it is constantly generating new sequences, all the while doing so in a way that responds to the unique changes in the city’s environmental conditions. The effect is a perpetually moving light show, an incessant video montage that is constantly reinventing itself.
The footage used was shot all around the region of Seattle, including but not limited to neighbouring mountain ranges and the city of Seattle itself. In this sense, Mirror is not merely a reflection of Seattle’s urban core — instead, it is a totalizing representation of the environment surrounding and affecting the very hustle and bustle of the city itself. Its constant visual manifestation of every minute of Seattle life calls into question philosophical notions of space and time, and its juxtaposition of rural and urban imagery provides a valuable reminder of the larger environment of which cities are a part. If Mirror is anything like Aitken’s past installations, it is sure to spark interesting dialogues, and hopefully some that delve deeper than the phrase “very cool,” the general consensus on the Internet thus far.
Although it may be a permanent fixture of the SAM, the installation is experimental at its core, so its very essence is its ability to grow and evolve over time. We will be watching the evolution of Mirror closely. If any of you happen upon this installation in real life, drop us a line — we’d love to hear about it! 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Doug Aitken's Mirror at the Seattle Art Museum

American multimedia and light artist Doug Aitken’s new installation Mirror strives to be a living museum, a dynamic representation of the constantly changing urban core of Seattle. Installed permanently on the north-west corner of the Seattle Art Museum, Mirror was unveiled this past Sunday and has since been received very warmly by the online community. 
Described as a “living kaleidoscope,” the installation responds to changes in weather conditions, pedestrian movement, and lighting conditions. Referring to its reservoir of hundreds of hours of video footage, the installation uses data from its sensors to compose these moving images, choreographing them in unexpected ways. Most interestingly, the installation has been programmed in such a way that the same sequence never occurs twice — it is constantly generating new sequences, all the while doing so in a way that responds to the unique changes in the city’s environmental conditions. The effect is a perpetually moving light show, an incessant video montage that is constantly reinventing itself.
The footage used was shot all around the region of Seattle, including but not limited to neighbouring mountain ranges and the city of Seattle itself. In this sense, Mirror is not merely a reflection of Seattle’s urban core — instead, it is a totalizing representation of the environment surrounding and affecting the very hustle and bustle of the city itself. Its constant visual manifestation of every minute of Seattle life calls into question philosophical notions of space and time, and its juxtaposition of rural and urban imagery provides a valuable reminder of the larger environment of which cities are a part. If Mirror is anything like Aitken’s past installations, it is sure to spark interesting dialogues, and hopefully some that delve deeper than the phrase “very cool,” the general consensus on the Internet thus far.
Although it may be a permanent fixture of the SAM, the installation is experimental at its core, so its very essence is its ability to grow and evolve over time. We will be watching the evolution of Mirror closely. If any of you happen upon this installation in real life, drop us a line — we’d love to hear about it! 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Doug Aitken's Mirror at the Seattle Art Museum

American multimedia and light artist Doug Aitken’s new installation Mirror strives to be a living museum, a dynamic representation of the constantly changing urban core of Seattle. Installed permanently on the north-west corner of the Seattle Art Museum, Mirror was unveiled this past Sunday and has since been received very warmly by the online community. 
Described as a “living kaleidoscope,” the installation responds to changes in weather conditions, pedestrian movement, and lighting conditions. Referring to its reservoir of hundreds of hours of video footage, the installation uses data from its sensors to compose these moving images, choreographing them in unexpected ways. Most interestingly, the installation has been programmed in such a way that the same sequence never occurs twice — it is constantly generating new sequences, all the while doing so in a way that responds to the unique changes in the city’s environmental conditions. The effect is a perpetually moving light show, an incessant video montage that is constantly reinventing itself.
The footage used was shot all around the region of Seattle, including but not limited to neighbouring mountain ranges and the city of Seattle itself. In this sense, Mirror is not merely a reflection of Seattle’s urban core — instead, it is a totalizing representation of the environment surrounding and affecting the very hustle and bustle of the city itself. Its constant visual manifestation of every minute of Seattle life calls into question philosophical notions of space and time, and its juxtaposition of rural and urban imagery provides a valuable reminder of the larger environment of which cities are a part. If Mirror is anything like Aitken’s past installations, it is sure to spark interesting dialogues, and hopefully some that delve deeper than the phrase “very cool,” the general consensus on the Internet thus far.
Although it may be a permanent fixture of the SAM, the installation is experimental at its core, so its very essence is its ability to grow and evolve over time. We will be watching the evolution of Mirror closely. If any of you happen upon this installation in real life, drop us a line — we’d love to hear about it! 
- Gabrielle Doiron

Doug Aitken's Mirror at the Seattle Art Museum

American multimedia and light artist Doug Aitken’s new installation Mirror strives to be a living museum, a dynamic representation of the constantly changing urban core of Seattle. Installed permanently on the north-west corner of the Seattle Art MuseumMirror was unveiled this past Sunday and has since been received very warmly by the online community. 

Described as a “living kaleidoscope,” the installation responds to changes in weather conditions, pedestrian movement, and lighting conditions. Referring to its reservoir of hundreds of hours of video footage, the installation uses data from its sensors to compose these moving images, choreographing them in unexpected ways. Most interestingly, the installation has been programmed in such a way that the same sequence never occurs twice — it is constantly generating new sequences, all the while doing so in a way that responds to the unique changes in the city’s environmental conditions. The effect is a perpetually moving light show, an incessant video montage that is constantly reinventing itself.

The footage used was shot all around the region of Seattle, including but not limited to neighbouring mountain ranges and the city of Seattle itself. In this sense, Mirror is not merely a reflection of Seattle’s urban core — instead, it is a totalizing representation of the environment surrounding and affecting the very hustle and bustle of the city itself. Its constant visual manifestation of every minute of Seattle life calls into question philosophical notions of space and time, and its juxtaposition of rural and urban imagery provides a valuable reminder of the larger environment of which cities are a part. If Mirror is anything like Aitken’s past installations, it is sure to spark interesting dialogues, and hopefully some that delve deeper than the phrase “very cool,” the general consensus on the Internet thus far.

Although it may be a permanent fixture of the SAM, the installation is experimental at its core, so its very essence is its ability to grow and evolve over time. We will be watching the evolution of Mirror closely. If any of you happen upon this installation in real life, drop us a line — we’d love to hear about it! 

Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ art architecture Seattle Doug Aitken technology video Gabrielle Doiron Seattle Art Museum

Ryoji Ikeda

I don’t know much about mathematics or sciences in general. Nevertheless, I appreciated Ryoji Ikeda’s works, which will be shown at DHC/ART gallery in Montreal until November. It is because they evoke the idea of the infinite, both throughout the notion of time and of space expressed by the flux of information from different fields of science, that the artworks of the Japanese artist are so fascinating. 

Divided in half, DHC/ART gallery chose to show the videos in the secondary building and the bidimensional works on the four floors of the main exhibition space. The installation regrouping videos of the series datamatics was particularly hypnotic. Nine projections, one expending from floor to ceiling, were alternating the showing of information in motion taking different visual aspects. Linking sound and light, this installation permits the viewer to lose himself in the motion of graphics and the flux of numbers. It is our task to find out what they each represent: space, or maybe  DNA codes? Whatever the case may be, the subject of theses black and white images formed of lines, dots and numbers, inducts a state of mind similar to being in trance. At a certain moment, all the videos synchronize to show images at a crazy speed: they hit our brain so fast that we feel the time speeding up or even that we blinked even if we didn’t.

Some of Ryoji Ikeda’s works are so finely detailed, that we are provided with a magnifying glass to perceive them. We become explorers of the infinitely small, in an almost meditative way, in front of these minimalistic abstractions.

About the artist:  http://www.ryojiikeda.com/

About the gallery:   http://dhc-art.org/

- Marilyse Chaussée

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

artscienceryoji ikedavideodhc artmarilyse chaussée

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