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Water Light Graffiti by Antonin Fourneau

Graffiti art on its own is an amazing, albeit misunderstood art practice, but what happens when you swap concrete walls for LED lights and spray cans with a water gun? You get Water Light Graffiti! Created by Antonin Fourneau as part of his artist residency with Digitalarti Artlab, Water Light Graffiti is a wall of LED lights that is triggered to turn on selected lights, when they come into contact with water. It is fun for all ages! Months of testing went into making sure the LED lights turned on once in contact with water, but clearly all that work paid off.

Electronics and water are not often paired together, but because water is conductive, it reacts with specifically placed metal contacts on the circuit board of lights, decreasing resistance and allowing a current to flow. Christopher J. Woodall created his own version of this water-activated circuit, and with plenty of info-graphics and instructions, provides enough information for you to make your own!

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

antonin fourneauanna paluchwater light graffitielectricitywatergraffiticonductivitycodesLED lightsChristopher J. Woodallartscienceart and science journaldigitalarti artlab

Azuma Makoto: Water and Bonsai

As an artform that can be traced back over two thousand years in Japanese history, the cultivation of the bonsai follows many horticultural and aesthetic properties that are said to evoke unique responses from different viewers. Traditionally grown small enough to fit inside a small pot, the bonsai generally symbolizes “the aesthetic qualities found in nature through balance, simplicity, and harmony,” with balance being a key element of the bonsai’s aesthetic qualities. 

In this installation, Water and Bonsai, self-proclaimed “botanical artist” Azuma Makoto submerges what appears to be a small bonsai tree in an aquarium filled with water. Upon further inspection, however, we learn that this bonsai is actually a piece of deadwood adorned with moss. The moss is kept alive with the aid of a filtration system and LED lights. 

As Makoto describes the work, 

Bonsai transforms its shape through [the] ages [and] now finds a life in water and continues to be alive. We can, continuously, admire its new appearance with plants from land and water within clear water.”

In this sense, Water and Bonsai seeks to redefine the tradition of the bonsai by exposing it to a new natural element: the water. The bonsai’s shifting appearance in the water further demonstrates its ability to achieve aesthetic balance and harmony by being “one with the water.” As a result, Makoto exposes us to a sort of miniaturized botanical ecosystem that showcases the beauty and complexity of the plant world. 

Azuma Makoto’s practice as a botanical artist involves the staging and creation of “botanical sculptures” and large scale art installations. For more information about Makoto’s other projects, visit his website here

Victoria Nolte

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

artscienceartsciencebonsaibotanical installationwaterbotanyazuma makotovictoria nolte
Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space
Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.
Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”
Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”
If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.
To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself. 
Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space
Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.
Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”
Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”
If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.
To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself. 
Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space
Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.
Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”
Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”
If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.
To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself. 
Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it. 
- Gabrielle Doiron
Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space
Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.
Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”
Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”
If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.
To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself. 
Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it. 
- Gabrielle Doiron

Wendy: Dance and neutralize pollutants all in one space


Meet Wendy, a dynamic partyscape in Queens, NY that was designed with an environmental conscience. It provides an edgy, spacious, fun space to party in — all the while cleaning the air.

Architects Matthias Hollwich and Marc Kushner (HWKN), winners of this year’s MoMA Young Architects Program (a competition to build an outdoor partyscape for its PS1 location in Queen’s) were encouraged to work within guidelines that addressed issues of sustainability and recycling. As Hollwich said, “Architecture is entering a new period where buildings have personality, rights, and responsibility. Wendy is testing these grounds on a social, ecological, and humanisitic level.”

Their design consists of a ginormous scaffolding to support 1555 square yards of fabric coated in a solution of titania nanoparticles, which neutralizes airborne toxins. In this way, HWKN designed a rooftop partyscape that contributes some part in cleaning the air. As described by Hauke Jungjohann, director at Wendy’s structural engineering consultant firm, “Wendy is the perfect synergy of architectural aesthetics, systems efficiency and structural creativity. The magic of Wendy lies in the usage of something simple like a scaffolding system and reinventing its usage so that something new appears that has never been seen before.”

If you need any more proof that this is an awesome design, it is expected that Wendy’s impact on air pollution during the summer of 2012 will be equivalent to taking 260 cars off the road. And those spiky arms in the design? They shoot out blasts of cool air, music and water. With temperatures reaching the mid-thirties in Ottawa within the last few days, Wendy sounds like the awesomest summer party space ever.

To help fund the construction of this ambitious and complicated structure, HWKN worked with graphic designers to design merchandise (bags & T-shirts), all of which are also coated with the same pollution-neutralizing solution used on the structure itself.

Click here to visit Wendy’s website, where you can learn more about the design, watch videos, and even buy some titania nanoparticle-soaked, pollution-fighting merch if you are so inclined. If you are near Queens at any point this summer, check out Wendy! We’d love to hear your opinions about it.

- Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

4 Photos
/ MoMa New York Wendy architecture art art and science artscience design environment pollution summer sustainability water science Gabrielle Doiron
Matthew Brandt: Lakes and Reservoirs
From a photographer who will step on strangers’ balconies and hike to the top of hills to capture the perfect photograph comes Lakes and Reservoirs, a series of prints that were created using the water of the lakes photographed.
Matthew Brandt, an experimental photographer, is no stranger to taking more than his subjects’ images home with him after a day of photographing. Be it a friend, a tree, a bee or a lake — Brandt makes certain that the subject is as involved in the process of the development of the image as it is present in the image itself.
When capturing the images from his photographic series entitled “Lakes and Reservoirs” Brandt carried two things with him: his camera and a five-gallon jug to fill up with lake water. The process, quite simply, is as follows. After taking the photograph, collecting a generous water sample, and making his prints, Brandt pours the water into a large tray and submerges the print in the water. As he describes it, “from this point I wait for the water to break down its own photographic image. Depending on the image density and water, this breakdown time can take days or weeks”.
In addition to lake water, body fluids and bugs have also been used in his dark room. Brandt once made salted-paper prints of a portrait of his friend using the salt from the subject’s tears (I wonder how he made him cry?). In his series entitled Honeybees, Brandt used an emulsion of crushed bees as an ingredient to develop his photographs of the insects (to be clear, he did not kill the bees, but rather reportedly found hundreds of them dead and dying along the California shoreline).
In his work, Brandt aims to explore the idea that his images are mirrors of themselves, constituting themselves physically of the subject that they reflect visually. For Brandt, this series also attempts to parallel two examples of obsolescence— that of the lowering waterlines of the lakes (and consequently degrading water quality) and that of the c-prints he makes, outdated by more efficient photo printing technologies. 
In many of his images, the calm surface of the lake is violently distorted by the chemical constituents of the water, interrupting its seemingly flawless facade, and in some cases, obliterating more than half of the original image. Read into them what you will, but I would argue that there is something undeniable in these images that taps into our modern eco-consciousness. If the constituents of the water can cause such noticeable chemical reactions in the dark room, how does this affect the natural environment to which the water belongs? 
Matthew Brandt’s series “Lakes and Reservoirs” is currently featured in his exhibition “Lakes, Trees, and Honeybees” at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, NY. For more of Matthew Brandt’s work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Matthew Brandt: Lakes and Reservoirs
From a photographer who will step on strangers’ balconies and hike to the top of hills to capture the perfect photograph comes Lakes and Reservoirs, a series of prints that were created using the water of the lakes photographed.
Matthew Brandt, an experimental photographer, is no stranger to taking more than his subjects’ images home with him after a day of photographing. Be it a friend, a tree, a bee or a lake — Brandt makes certain that the subject is as involved in the process of the development of the image as it is present in the image itself.
When capturing the images from his photographic series entitled “Lakes and Reservoirs” Brandt carried two things with him: his camera and a five-gallon jug to fill up with lake water. The process, quite simply, is as follows. After taking the photograph, collecting a generous water sample, and making his prints, Brandt pours the water into a large tray and submerges the print in the water. As he describes it, “from this point I wait for the water to break down its own photographic image. Depending on the image density and water, this breakdown time can take days or weeks”.
In addition to lake water, body fluids and bugs have also been used in his dark room. Brandt once made salted-paper prints of a portrait of his friend using the salt from the subject’s tears (I wonder how he made him cry?). In his series entitled Honeybees, Brandt used an emulsion of crushed bees as an ingredient to develop his photographs of the insects (to be clear, he did not kill the bees, but rather reportedly found hundreds of them dead and dying along the California shoreline).
In his work, Brandt aims to explore the idea that his images are mirrors of themselves, constituting themselves physically of the subject that they reflect visually. For Brandt, this series also attempts to parallel two examples of obsolescence— that of the lowering waterlines of the lakes (and consequently degrading water quality) and that of the c-prints he makes, outdated by more efficient photo printing technologies. 
In many of his images, the calm surface of the lake is violently distorted by the chemical constituents of the water, interrupting its seemingly flawless facade, and in some cases, obliterating more than half of the original image. Read into them what you will, but I would argue that there is something undeniable in these images that taps into our modern eco-consciousness. If the constituents of the water can cause such noticeable chemical reactions in the dark room, how does this affect the natural environment to which the water belongs? 
Matthew Brandt’s series “Lakes and Reservoirs” is currently featured in his exhibition “Lakes, Trees, and Honeybees” at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, NY. For more of Matthew Brandt’s work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Matthew Brandt: Lakes and Reservoirs
From a photographer who will step on strangers’ balconies and hike to the top of hills to capture the perfect photograph comes Lakes and Reservoirs, a series of prints that were created using the water of the lakes photographed.
Matthew Brandt, an experimental photographer, is no stranger to taking more than his subjects’ images home with him after a day of photographing. Be it a friend, a tree, a bee or a lake — Brandt makes certain that the subject is as involved in the process of the development of the image as it is present in the image itself.
When capturing the images from his photographic series entitled “Lakes and Reservoirs” Brandt carried two things with him: his camera and a five-gallon jug to fill up with lake water. The process, quite simply, is as follows. After taking the photograph, collecting a generous water sample, and making his prints, Brandt pours the water into a large tray and submerges the print in the water. As he describes it, “from this point I wait for the water to break down its own photographic image. Depending on the image density and water, this breakdown time can take days or weeks”.
In addition to lake water, body fluids and bugs have also been used in his dark room. Brandt once made salted-paper prints of a portrait of his friend using the salt from the subject’s tears (I wonder how he made him cry?). In his series entitled Honeybees, Brandt used an emulsion of crushed bees as an ingredient to develop his photographs of the insects (to be clear, he did not kill the bees, but rather reportedly found hundreds of them dead and dying along the California shoreline).
In his work, Brandt aims to explore the idea that his images are mirrors of themselves, constituting themselves physically of the subject that they reflect visually. For Brandt, this series also attempts to parallel two examples of obsolescence— that of the lowering waterlines of the lakes (and consequently degrading water quality) and that of the c-prints he makes, outdated by more efficient photo printing technologies. 
In many of his images, the calm surface of the lake is violently distorted by the chemical constituents of the water, interrupting its seemingly flawless facade, and in some cases, obliterating more than half of the original image. Read into them what you will, but I would argue that there is something undeniable in these images that taps into our modern eco-consciousness. If the constituents of the water can cause such noticeable chemical reactions in the dark room, how does this affect the natural environment to which the water belongs? 
Matthew Brandt’s series “Lakes and Reservoirs” is currently featured in his exhibition “Lakes, Trees, and Honeybees” at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, NY. For more of Matthew Brandt’s work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Matthew Brandt: Lakes and Reservoirs
From a photographer who will step on strangers’ balconies and hike to the top of hills to capture the perfect photograph comes Lakes and Reservoirs, a series of prints that were created using the water of the lakes photographed.
Matthew Brandt, an experimental photographer, is no stranger to taking more than his subjects’ images home with him after a day of photographing. Be it a friend, a tree, a bee or a lake — Brandt makes certain that the subject is as involved in the process of the development of the image as it is present in the image itself.
When capturing the images from his photographic series entitled “Lakes and Reservoirs” Brandt carried two things with him: his camera and a five-gallon jug to fill up with lake water. The process, quite simply, is as follows. After taking the photograph, collecting a generous water sample, and making his prints, Brandt pours the water into a large tray and submerges the print in the water. As he describes it, “from this point I wait for the water to break down its own photographic image. Depending on the image density and water, this breakdown time can take days or weeks”.
In addition to lake water, body fluids and bugs have also been used in his dark room. Brandt once made salted-paper prints of a portrait of his friend using the salt from the subject’s tears (I wonder how he made him cry?). In his series entitled Honeybees, Brandt used an emulsion of crushed bees as an ingredient to develop his photographs of the insects (to be clear, he did not kill the bees, but rather reportedly found hundreds of them dead and dying along the California shoreline).
In his work, Brandt aims to explore the idea that his images are mirrors of themselves, constituting themselves physically of the subject that they reflect visually. For Brandt, this series also attempts to parallel two examples of obsolescence— that of the lowering waterlines of the lakes (and consequently degrading water quality) and that of the c-prints he makes, outdated by more efficient photo printing technologies. 
In many of his images, the calm surface of the lake is violently distorted by the chemical constituents of the water, interrupting its seemingly flawless facade, and in some cases, obliterating more than half of the original image. Read into them what you will, but I would argue that there is something undeniable in these images that taps into our modern eco-consciousness. If the constituents of the water can cause such noticeable chemical reactions in the dark room, how does this affect the natural environment to which the water belongs? 
Matthew Brandt’s series “Lakes and Reservoirs” is currently featured in his exhibition “Lakes, Trees, and Honeybees” at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, NY. For more of Matthew Brandt’s work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron
Matthew Brandt: Lakes and Reservoirs
From a photographer who will step on strangers’ balconies and hike to the top of hills to capture the perfect photograph comes Lakes and Reservoirs, a series of prints that were created using the water of the lakes photographed.
Matthew Brandt, an experimental photographer, is no stranger to taking more than his subjects’ images home with him after a day of photographing. Be it a friend, a tree, a bee or a lake — Brandt makes certain that the subject is as involved in the process of the development of the image as it is present in the image itself.
When capturing the images from his photographic series entitled “Lakes and Reservoirs” Brandt carried two things with him: his camera and a five-gallon jug to fill up with lake water. The process, quite simply, is as follows. After taking the photograph, collecting a generous water sample, and making his prints, Brandt pours the water into a large tray and submerges the print in the water. As he describes it, “from this point I wait for the water to break down its own photographic image. Depending on the image density and water, this breakdown time can take days or weeks”.
In addition to lake water, body fluids and bugs have also been used in his dark room. Brandt once made salted-paper prints of a portrait of his friend using the salt from the subject’s tears (I wonder how he made him cry?). In his series entitled Honeybees, Brandt used an emulsion of crushed bees as an ingredient to develop his photographs of the insects (to be clear, he did not kill the bees, but rather reportedly found hundreds of them dead and dying along the California shoreline).
In his work, Brandt aims to explore the idea that his images are mirrors of themselves, constituting themselves physically of the subject that they reflect visually. For Brandt, this series also attempts to parallel two examples of obsolescence— that of the lowering waterlines of the lakes (and consequently degrading water quality) and that of the c-prints he makes, outdated by more efficient photo printing technologies. 
In many of his images, the calm surface of the lake is violently distorted by the chemical constituents of the water, interrupting its seemingly flawless facade, and in some cases, obliterating more than half of the original image. Read into them what you will, but I would argue that there is something undeniable in these images that taps into our modern eco-consciousness. If the constituents of the water can cause such noticeable chemical reactions in the dark room, how does this affect the natural environment to which the water belongs? 
Matthew Brandt’s series “Lakes and Reservoirs” is currently featured in his exhibition “Lakes, Trees, and Honeybees” at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, NY. For more of Matthew Brandt’s work, click here.
- Gabrielle Doiron

Matthew Brandt: Lakes and Reservoirs

From a photographer who will step on strangers’ balconies and hike to the top of hills to capture the perfect photograph comes Lakes and Reservoirs, a series of prints that were created using the water of the lakes photographed.

Matthew Brandt, an experimental photographer, is no stranger to taking more than his subjects’ images home with him after a day of photographing. Be it a friend, a tree, a bee or a lake — Brandt makes certain that the subject is as involved in the process of the development of the image as it is present in the image itself.

When capturing the images from his photographic series entitled “Lakes and Reservoirs” Brandt carried two things with him: his camera and a five-gallon jug to fill up with lake water. The process, quite simply, is as follows. After taking the photograph, collecting a generous water sample, and making his prints, Brandt pours the water into a large tray and submerges the print in the water. As he describes it, “from this point I wait for the water to break down its own photographic image. Depending on the image density and water, this breakdown time can take days or weeks”.

In addition to lake water, body fluids and bugs have also been used in his dark room. Brandt once made salted-paper prints of a portrait of his friend using the salt from the subject’s tears (I wonder how he made him cry?). In his series entitled Honeybees, Brandt used an emulsion of crushed bees as an ingredient to develop his photographs of the insects (to be clear, he did not kill the bees, but rather reportedly found hundreds of them dead and dying along the California shoreline).

In his work, Brandt aims to explore the idea that his images are mirrors of themselves, constituting themselves physically of the subject that they reflect visually. For Brandt, this series also attempts to parallel two examples of obsolescence— that of the lowering waterlines of the lakes (and consequently degrading water quality) and that of the c-prints he makes, outdated by more efficient photo printing technologies. 

In many of his images, the calm surface of the lake is violently distorted by the chemical constituents of the water, interrupting its seemingly flawless facade, and in some cases, obliterating more than half of the original image. Read into them what you will, but I would argue that there is something undeniable in these images that taps into our modern eco-consciousness. If the constituents of the water can cause such noticeable chemical reactions in the dark room, how does this affect the natural environment to which the water belongs? 

Matthew Brandt’s series “Lakes and Reservoirs” is currently featured in his exhibition “Lakes, Trees, and Honeybees” at the Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, NY. For more of Matthew Brandt’s work, click here.

- Gabrielle Doiron

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

5 Photos
/ art art and science art process artscience bees dark room environment nature photography science water Matthew Brandt America Gabrielle Doiron

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