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Windswept by Charles Sowers

Though we cannot physically hold wind or see its swirling forms around us, we can definitely feel it.

In order to help visualize wind-currents, artist Charles Sowers created a kinetic installation consisting of 612 aluminum weather vanes called “Windswept” (2011). These were then meticulously placed on the side of the Randall Museum in San Francisco. Through this installation, we are able to see the patterns in the wind; where the currents go, how they turn, and sometimes how wind can abruptly change direction. This gives us a visual representation of the natural, invisible, force which moves around us, and sometimes with enough force, pushes and pulls us.

As the artist states:

Our ordinary experience of wind is as a solitary sample point of a very large invisible phenomenon. Windswept is a kind of large sensor array that samples the wind at its point of interaction with the Randall Museum building and reveals the complexity and structure of that interaction.

This sort of installation creates a better understanding, and appreciation, of the wind. It is not just one large gust; a single wave can be made up of smaller currents, going in their own directions from the main flow. A dialogue begins to form between the building and the wind, the weather vanes acting as translators.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

Charles Sowersanna paluchwindweather vaneweatherRandall MuseumWindsweptscienceartart and science journal
(Microscopic) Winter Wonderland
Most of North America might be freezing due to the Polar Vortex, but don’t let some cold weather stop you from enjoying this amazing display of geometric snow crystals, otherwise known as, snowflakes.
Under an electron microscope, these tiny specs of snow begin to reveal just how much detail and symmetry is in something as delicate as a snowflake. It’s amazing to think that such ‘structures’ can melt away the second they fall on our skin, or can be crushed to oblivion just by stepping on them. 
The Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC), located in Maryland, photographs the hidden world of these delicate snow crystals. Hydrologists use their findings to determine the water content in snow during winter, which can then be analyzed to determine water supply and chances of flood when the snow melts. Aesthetically, the shapes these crystals create are pretty cool, with some, almost looking like parts of a machine, or a fallen city.
Whether you like winter, or really hate it, there is no denying that the formations of snowflakes are an incredible phenomenon; almost like there’s some sort of microscopic team of engineers up in those clouds, designing these intricate shapes.
-Anna Paluch
(Microscopic) Winter Wonderland
Most of North America might be freezing due to the Polar Vortex, but don’t let some cold weather stop you from enjoying this amazing display of geometric snow crystals, otherwise known as, snowflakes.
Under an electron microscope, these tiny specs of snow begin to reveal just how much detail and symmetry is in something as delicate as a snowflake. It’s amazing to think that such ‘structures’ can melt away the second they fall on our skin, or can be crushed to oblivion just by stepping on them. 
The Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC), located in Maryland, photographs the hidden world of these delicate snow crystals. Hydrologists use their findings to determine the water content in snow during winter, which can then be analyzed to determine water supply and chances of flood when the snow melts. Aesthetically, the shapes these crystals create are pretty cool, with some, almost looking like parts of a machine, or a fallen city.
Whether you like winter, or really hate it, there is no denying that the formations of snowflakes are an incredible phenomenon; almost like there’s some sort of microscopic team of engineers up in those clouds, designing these intricate shapes.
-Anna Paluch
(Microscopic) Winter Wonderland
Most of North America might be freezing due to the Polar Vortex, but don’t let some cold weather stop you from enjoying this amazing display of geometric snow crystals, otherwise known as, snowflakes.
Under an electron microscope, these tiny specs of snow begin to reveal just how much detail and symmetry is in something as delicate as a snowflake. It’s amazing to think that such ‘structures’ can melt away the second they fall on our skin, or can be crushed to oblivion just by stepping on them. 
The Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC), located in Maryland, photographs the hidden world of these delicate snow crystals. Hydrologists use their findings to determine the water content in snow during winter, which can then be analyzed to determine water supply and chances of flood when the snow melts. Aesthetically, the shapes these crystals create are pretty cool, with some, almost looking like parts of a machine, or a fallen city.
Whether you like winter, or really hate it, there is no denying that the formations of snowflakes are an incredible phenomenon; almost like there’s some sort of microscopic team of engineers up in those clouds, designing these intricate shapes.
-Anna Paluch

(Microscopic) Winter Wonderland

Most of North America might be freezing due to the Polar Vortex, but don’t let some cold weather stop you from enjoying this amazing display of geometric snow crystals, otherwise known as, snowflakes.

Under an electron microscope, these tiny specs of snow begin to reveal just how much detail and symmetry is in something as delicate as a snowflake. It’s amazing to think that such ‘structures’ can melt away the second they fall on our skin, or can be crushed to oblivion just by stepping on them. 

The Beltsville Agricultural Research Center (BARC), located in Maryland, photographs the hidden world of these delicate snow crystals. Hydrologists use their findings to determine the water content in snow during winter, which can then be analyzed to determine water supply and chances of flood when the snow melts. Aesthetically, the shapes these crystals create are pretty cool, with some, almost looking like parts of a machine, or a fallen city.

Whether you like winter, or really hate it, there is no denying that the formations of snowflakes are an incredible phenomenon; almost like there’s some sort of microscopic team of engineers up in those clouds, designing these intricate shapes.

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

3 Photos
/ beltsville agriculture research center BARC agriculture Electron microscopy snow weather snowflake anna paluch art science art and science journal
Ana Rewakowicz’s The Cloud
You’ve probably heard of the artist who created a cloud in the middle of a gallery space (if not, click this link and you will!), but what about something more interactive?
What if there was a cloud that, by participating with the work, you could move the cloud higher in the ‘atmosphere’, lower, or even…make it rain? Well, Polish-born artist Ana Rewakowicz has just the thing! Her work The Cloud (2011), a collaboration with engineer Pierre Jutras, is made up of four ‘bladders’ assembled in a cloud shape, that are filled with helium. This allows the structure to float in the air.But that’s not all! There are also tubes attached to water jugs, which in turn are attached to hand pumps. The viewer, or should I say participator, decides just how much water the cloud should have, and when full and partially to the ground, the cloud will rain. Yes, rain.And then just float back up to it’s original position!Not only is this a great aesthetic piece for any gallery space, but it is also an opportunity to learn more about how various things in nature work, in this case, a cloud. Knowledge and art unite!-Anna Paluch

Ana Rewakowicz’s The Cloud

You’ve probably heard of the artist who created a cloud in the middle of a gallery space (if not, click this link and you will!), but what about something more interactive?

What if there was a cloud that, by participating with the work, you could move the cloud higher in the ‘atmosphere’, lower, or even…make it rain? Well, Polish-born artist Ana Rewakowicz has just the thing! Her work The Cloud (2011), a collaboration with engineer Pierre Jutras, is made up of four ‘bladders’ assembled in a cloud shape, that are filled with helium. This allows the structure to float in the air.

But that’s not all! There are also tubes attached to water jugs, which in turn are attached to hand pumps. The viewer, or should I say participator, decides just how much water the cloud should have, and when full and partially to the ground, the cloud will rain. Yes, rain.

And then just float back up to it’s original position!

Not only is this a great aesthetic piece for any gallery space, but it is also an opportunity to learn more about how various things in nature work, in this case, a cloud. Knowledge and art unite!

-Anna Paluch

(Source: artandsciencejournal.com)

art science art and science journal ana rewakowicz cloud weather anna paluch
Random International’s Rain Room
Have you ever wished you could control the weather? 
Random International, a multimedia artist collective studio in London, is known for their sensational participatory works. As in many of their past projects,Rain Room relies on audience participation and serves as a platform to explore and research the behaviours of its viewers. 
In this ambitious project, installed now at the Barbican Centre in London, viewers progress through a one hundred square metre of falling water, and in the process attempt to avoid being drenched. The project is a meticulously choreographed downpour that responds to the movements of the viewer, making it entirely possible to control the rain. 
Rain Room therefore not only encourages its audience to become participants, but also invites them to contemplate how technology alters our environment, ultimately questioning the role humans play in its alteration. It provides an instance where the forces beyond human control (i.e.: the weather) are manipulated by human activity.
For more information about Rain Room and Random International, please visit the Barbican Centre’s website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Random International’s Rain Room
Have you ever wished you could control the weather? 
Random International, a multimedia artist collective studio in London, is known for their sensational participatory works. As in many of their past projects,Rain Room relies on audience participation and serves as a platform to explore and research the behaviours of its viewers. 
In this ambitious project, installed now at the Barbican Centre in London, viewers progress through a one hundred square metre of falling water, and in the process attempt to avoid being drenched. The project is a meticulously choreographed downpour that responds to the movements of the viewer, making it entirely possible to control the rain. 
Rain Room therefore not only encourages its audience to become participants, but also invites them to contemplate how technology alters our environment, ultimately questioning the role humans play in its alteration. It provides an instance where the forces beyond human control (i.e.: the weather) are manipulated by human activity.
For more information about Rain Room and Random International, please visit the Barbican Centre’s website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Random International’s Rain Room
Have you ever wished you could control the weather? 
Random International, a multimedia artist collective studio in London, is known for their sensational participatory works. As in many of their past projects,Rain Room relies on audience participation and serves as a platform to explore and research the behaviours of its viewers. 
In this ambitious project, installed now at the Barbican Centre in London, viewers progress through a one hundred square metre of falling water, and in the process attempt to avoid being drenched. The project is a meticulously choreographed downpour that responds to the movements of the viewer, making it entirely possible to control the rain. 
Rain Room therefore not only encourages its audience to become participants, but also invites them to contemplate how technology alters our environment, ultimately questioning the role humans play in its alteration. It provides an instance where the forces beyond human control (i.e.: the weather) are manipulated by human activity.
For more information about Rain Room and Random International, please visit the Barbican Centre’s website. 
- Victoria Nolte
Random International’s Rain Room
Have you ever wished you could control the weather? 
Random International, a multimedia artist collective studio in London, is known for their sensational participatory works. As in many of their past projects,Rain Room relies on audience participation and serves as a platform to explore and research the behaviours of its viewers. 
In this ambitious project, installed now at the Barbican Centre in London, viewers progress through a one hundred square metre of falling water, and in the process attempt to avoid being drenched. The project is a meticulously choreographed downpour that responds to the movements of the viewer, making it entirely possible to control the rain. 
Rain Room therefore not only encourages its audience to become participants, but also invites them to contemplate how technology alters our environment, ultimately questioning the role humans play in its alteration. It provides an instance where the forces beyond human control (i.e.: the weather) are manipulated by human activity.
For more information about Rain Room and Random International, please visit the Barbican Centre’s website. 
- Victoria Nolte

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